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>> Home > Tags > chine

chine
chines
sewing machine
chine
Fitting the rubbing strakes. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
Before I can apply the final coats of epoxy on the hull I need to fit the two rubbing strakes. I started with the bottom rubbing strake which runs along the chine where the side skins and bottom skins meet. The strakes meet the external keel at the bow and also extend across the stern. I used a length of square section of obeche which needed a gentle curve towards the bow, rather than steam the wood I soaked it in water for a few minutes to soften it and then used a heat gun while bending the strip gently to the required curve. When the wood had cooled and dried the bend was set I did a test fit and drilled very fine holes through the strip so that the modelling pins I use to hold the piece in place would not split the wood. A 30 minute epoxy was used to fit the strakes on both sides of the hull and stern. Above this bottom strake is a second rubbing strake and this also meets the keel at the bow and runs across the stern, I used a broader and thinner obeche strip for this and it was prepared and fixed in the same way. The final pieces to fit will be the gunwales which run around the hull where the sides meet the deck but I will not fit them until I have planked the deck.

CNC boat kits...? by DodgyGeezer Lieutenant   Posted: 12 days ago
I'm doing the eShapeoko - I wanted a more rigid machine for general purposes, and I liked the fact that you could specify the X and Y axis lengths. For cutting model boat parts you rarely want something as wide as 1 foot - but you often want items of length greater than 1 yard. The eShapeoko has standard sizes as extreme as 15 inches by 60 inches, and can easily be extended. I've gone for 18 x 36 inches - should be fine for EeZebilts... One of the things that's a bit annoying with GRBL is that it doesn't currently do tool radius compensation. I'm using an arduino with grbl as well, and if I cut my plans as drawn they will all be a tool radius out. I am currently looking to use a 0.5mm tool so the effect will be small - but if you know of a better driver interpreter...?

CNC boat kits...? by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 13 days ago
Have a look at the Banggood website. They are selling A3 sized laser cutters for less than £200. It is sold as an engraver with a 2500 mW laser but this can be upgraded. It should cut ply up to 3mm albeit with multiple passes It comes as a kit with "Chinese" English instructions so you will need your modelling skills to assemble it. They are fairly flimsy as a stand-alone, but, if fixed to a stout MDF board, it should be sturdy enough

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by canabus Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
Hi All The boat had the rudder completely vertical to start with and that is the problem. With the rudder vertical the boat pulls the bow down in the turns which makes it sit up on the chine. A planning hull attack angle is about four degrees to the water, but these boats like an angle of about six degrees. The leading edge of the rudder and the angle of it governs bow lift or dip in the turns. Also the balance point of the boat is as important as the rudder setup. Canabus

CNC boat kits...? by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 13 days ago
Our local Makerspace has just acquired a laser cutter. The accuracy and clean nature of the cut are breathtaking. The edges are razor-sharp and the cut width is in the order of 0.1 mm. I know there are a few fossils out there who will huff and puff about new technology and extolling the virtues of half a Gillette razor blade but heed them not. Google Makerspace, find your local branch and join-up. If they haven't got a laser cutter they'll have a lot of other machinery which will enable to do far more than you can manage on your kitchen table.

CNC boat kits...? by DodgyGeezer Lieutenant   Posted: 14 days ago
Anyone into CNC, or perhaps looking to get into it? I am wondering about putting my plans out as G Code, and it would be useful to have a discussion about the practicalities. For instance, what bed size do people use? Model boat plans are a bit specialist for most CNC boards. They worry about cutting hard materials - we mainly use balsa and ply. Their machines are usually square - ours would need to be long and thin. They use big commercial routers and spindles - we could get away with smaller motors and dental burrs. I picked up one of these over Christmas, and am currently going through the learning curve. But it doesn't seem to be all that difficult.... https://amberspyglass.co.uk/store/index.php?seo_path=eshapeo... style='background-color:yellow;'>chine-mechanical-kit

Smoke generator by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 14 days ago
Have just made a prototype of a fan forced smoker which seems to be working well (despite breaking the heater coil by moving it while hot, - had it apart, broke wire, screw and washer repair, not quite as hot) I bought a couple of Heng Long smokers (for R/C tanks or cars) to play with, for $10 NZ each(or 5.3 Euros to you Northerners give or take a yen) from Bangood and just bought another from Ebay. There seem to be 2 different models, as one has a long coil with a lamp wick draped over it, which is sitting in the oil reservoir, the other has a small coil inside a piece of heat resistant woven tubing (as you might find insulating toaster/heater wiring etc) which acts as a wick and that also sits in cotton wool in the reservoir, (this seems to be the better of the two) Tip - don't fill the tank right up, only enough to soak the cotton, element should be just out of the oil. The wick loads the element. The better model seems to have a black top to the tank (also maybe either brown or black tank) and the other has a brown top and dirty brown tank. As with most of this stuff you won't know till you get it what it's going to be. What I did was remove the tank and cut off the pump tube just in front of the screw lugs (see black line in photo) then fitted the tank, and a 40x40x10 5v ESC fan (voltage controlled by a UBEC set to 5v on the jumpers) into a plastic electronics utility box from Jaycar (our local electronics and hobby store). I made up a double JST lead for the 2s 1800Mah Lipo and fired it up (using baby oil). It's pretty much silent and smokes well once it gets warmed up, ( starts smoking in about 5 seconds) You could control it (on/off volume) by either a remote on/off switch or perhaps a small cheap 10A brushed ESC. I would leave the fan running and control the element to avoid burning the element. The original pump tank inlet hole seems ok as is (approx 1.5mm) but you could enlarge it very slightly to get a better flow if you could find a better oil. At the electronics store they have proper smoke machine oil for $20 NZ per litre so I may have a look at that. The reason I went for the fan idea was that I found in std pump form, if I immersed a tube from the tank in water, it sucked water back into the tank. I was hoping it would pump smoke out of my HSL exhausts at water level alongside the cooling water but it would need a very light non return valve to do this. The fan seems to pump the smoke through 2mm ID silicone tube ok, so tubing of similar ID to the OD of the tank outlets should work well. These pumps in original form work pretty well for the price, and are cheap enough to keep a few for spare elements, the only thing is they are a bit noisy but in an 'engine sounding' way, (might add to the effect on a tug or work-boat though) What you have left after this mod is a very handy little geared motor with an eccentric output wheel which could be used for winches, radar and whirly bits of any description (see pic of motor leftover and original) To avoid burnout, these should be run on no more than a 2s (around 7.5v-(suggest 8v max with fan running) The other tank is going to work a lot better than this one but I'm not making a tug, just want a bit of exhaust smoke on start-up etc to go with the 2 sound units. Very cheap to make (around $25 NZ with pump, box, fan and UBEC all through Ebay, Aliexpress and Bangood (and local electronics store) If you wanted to run an ESC to control the smoke and you have no channels left to control it proportionally, you can always try using a second receiver bound to your TX, (if your TX will allow it,) power it and a brushed ESC (wired to the element) as normal and use the throttle channel to plug in your smoke control. This should work if you want more smoke as you accelerate or if you are using only 1 stick on a 2 stick TX you could use your 'elevator' stick pushed up (or a toggle switch if available) to start/stop the smoke (through the brushed ESC setup) . This setup weighs 100g (10g more than std) The quest for lots of smoke continues Will try to upload vid later and update progress.

Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels) by BOATSHED Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
robbob, You had lots of things on your Crash Tender build that was machined and turned? Your build was amazing, I watched it with awe.

Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels) by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
Perhaps if I had all the machine tooling that you have !!

Cabin detail part 5 speed control & compass by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
Cabin detail part 5 speed control & compass The speed control has two main throttle controls presumably to operate the engines independently. The construction of this piece made it easy to allow each arm to operate independently but to ensure that the levers had some stiffness in the travel I incorporated a spring into the centre screwed shaft. I machined some detail into the body and a recess in each end face to accommodate a dial (AHEAD, ASTERN, STOP, SLOW etc). The circular body needed something to stand on so I made a cradle, which will support it when it is screwed to the framework. I left the whole unit in natural brass, lacquered it to stop any tarnishing, and mounted it with an 8BA screw to hold it in position. The compass again a simple turned piece of brass with a recess machined into the top face to accept a N,S,E,W compass dial. This item is simply glued in the recess on the console.

Cabin detail part 4 Steering wheel by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
The steering wheel is a simple 3-spoke design; first, I machined a ring and a centre boss in brass. I then made a wooden jig to hold the parts in the correct position whilst soldering, this consisted of a turned block with a recess to locate the O/D, and the taper towards the centre hole to give a “dish effect” that locates the centre boss. This just leaves the three arms to machine; these are cut using a slitting saw to cut a 3mm wide strip from a piece of 1.5 mm brass plate. These are the cut to length ready for soft soldering and then the parts are all cleaned and placed in the jig, ideally a minimum of solder is used to minimise cleaning afterwards. The finishing/fettling I find is always easier if you use a sharp craft knife to slice any excess solder away as it doesn’t easily mark the brass in the same way you might using Swiss files, finally finish with 600 and 1000 w&d before priming ready for topcoat of black gloss. The first wheel I decided was too small so the pics are of that construction; the final larger wheel is in the last 3 pictures

Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels) by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
After the Christmas break its back to the cabin to finish some of the instrument detail. You may recall I detailed the cockpit with some ply constructions to represent the general layout; I also intend to detail the compass, throttle controls, steering wheel, panel lighting, and instrument panel. The instrument panel was copied and scaled from various drawing and pictures and I came up with a three-panel unit where panels 1 & 3 are identical as they are for the two-engine managements system the centre panel deals with electrical things. I intend to make the panel out of 1.5 mm aluminium cut to size on the guillotine I then attached this to a hardwood block with some strong double sided tape this will be more than strong enough to hold the piece for the drilling/light milling operation. I worked out the hole positions using an absolute datum (same as CNC work, if only I was still working) This does take some time using my rather old milling machine making sure any backlash is taken out during the 28 linear movements. I used various sizes of centre drills to produce the holes as they give not only accurate size but also perfectly round holes on thin material and the only ones that needed to be a particular size (6mm dial holes) the others are for switches and LEDs which can all be a 3 mm location hole. Each hole was drilled and then chamfered to simulate a bezel on the dials. Finally, I milled a shallow groove (2mm x 0.3 deep) to simulate the separate panels. I have copied a number of different marine dials from the internet and using PowerPoint I aligned in a complete group and then printed and laminated them, this will be placed behind the aluminium plate using double-sided tape. Having fixed the dials in place I drilled through the holes where LEDSs will fit. The LEDs will be shortened and polished so they are flat to the face; these are then stuck in place. Next, I made all the switches from brass bar with a fine brass pin glued across its face to simulate the lever. These were painted gloss black and the centre pin picked out in red, they were then glued into the 3 mm location hole. The black knobs/pull switches were turned out of black Perspex and polished; they were then glued into the location holes. The whole instrument panel is then pinned on to the wooden framework which has been left in natural wood finish (ply) as it looks like the original boat was just a varnished ply finish.

All hooked up, nowt happens... by DodgyGeezer Lieutenant   Posted: 17 days ago
Welcome to the magic world of cheap Chinese clone R/C equipment!

internet sales by keithtindley Lieutenant   Posted: 20 days ago
I have been reading about how the high street shops are suffering in regards to sales.I wish to plead guilty as i purchase most of my model boat kits and parts online ! The shop keepers have high rates and running costs etc when compared to some online retailers .I purchased online a 4 channel transmitter,receiver and 30amp esc from china for around £40 as this would cost double from a uk retailer its no wonder there are very few model shops left but as an Oap i look after the pennies.All the chinese parts are excellent and work well. I would prefer to buy local and enjoy a walk around a well stocked shop but difference in local retail prices and imported items is now too much.Model shops of my youth are sorely missed.

All hooked up, nowt happens... by DodgyGeezer Lieutenant   Posted: 22 days ago
This 'Cheap Chinese' design, according to the documentation, seems to come in several different (nominal) amp ratings, and, interestingly, in a 'standard car' or in a 'crawler' version. The one for crawlers - slow rock-climbing cars - is also recommended for tanks, and has a jumper giving the sort of instant reverse we would use for boats. This looks like an example... https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Waterproof-Brushed-1060-60A-ESC-F... Which might help if anyone's browsing cheap brandless ESCs...