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>> Home > Tags > coating

coating
boating
contra rotating
hull plating
coating
Thin Flat Timber by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Yep, Ikea wooden blinds are a good source of Lime wood, unfortunately they have stopped making that sort, so it is looking in skip times. Cut into strips and the coating sanded off are excellent for plank on frame boats, also good for deck planking and will take a stain. Alan

Fiberglassing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi chugalone 100 Welcome to the site. You can fibreglass with different types of resin and cloth. If you are making and casting a fibreglass hull use fibreglass matting but to cover a hull lightweight fibreglass cloth is best. This is the type shown in the suggested video. Resin can be epoxy or polyester based but the latter is generally cheaper and in my opinion is easier to use and doesn't require thinning with alcohol. It is sold as layup resin and is supplied with hardener. Do follow the instructions re quantity of each part and mix thoroughly. If you are using epoxy Iso Propyl Alcohol is the type to use and is clear. The video shows using a brush to apply the resin and whilst this is OK it will give a very thick and heavy coating. I use the brush to apply and then a credit card sized piece of plasticard to spread the resin over and into the surface of the cloth resulting in an almost opaque finish with the weave showing through. You do need to have a good surface to work with as any imperfections will show when the resin hardens. Once dry give a light sanding all over to remove any imperfections and fill any holes with car body filler and sand smooth. I then apply a very thin top coat of the resin using a brush. When dry use wet and dry to sand and if necessary apply further thin coats until you have the finish you require. I have a local supplier and if you visit the site http://www.resin-supplies.co.u k/product.htm all the resins/cloths etc are listed. Using Google should bring up a local supplier. you do need to follow the safety instructions to protect yourself and wear appropriate protection for your hands, eyes and breathing, it is also best to apply in a well ventilated area and not on a cold day. The end result will be well worth the effort to keep your tug waterproof. You could also paint the resin over thye inside of the hull to protect the wood from any water that doeos find its way inside. Dave

Bridge Build by Pav403 Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
Hello all, I've been busy with the Bridge build, this has proved a little tricky as the forward structure is at a slight angle when not on the ship. I've used a combination of 1/8 ply and 0.75mm plastic sheet. I needed the ply in this section as this will be where I will have hull access for batteries and needed the strength. The walls of the upper structure are plastic sheet which I think have come out well. There is still more to add (look out wings at the rear of the bridge need walls etc) I can the start to connect this to the decking before adding finer details. Coming on slowly is the hull, I will spend a bit more time here over the coming weeks to get it ready for sanding and then fibreglass coating. Good luck with your builds. Dave

To resin cover or not my ulises steam tug by Rochdaleblue Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi guys sorry if this is a newbie question but is it better to cover and epoxy my plank and frame hull or can I do as the instructions say and just seal fill and paint. Is the resin coating the only way to gets it really smooth.

water proofing by Peter47 Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
All of the above suggestion should work fine, but a good idea to remove as much H2O as possible after every sail, and leave hatches etc open at least over night, to allow for any remaining dampness to dissipate that may have by-passed the waterproof coating, Have a 1/24th scale Vosper Motor Torpedo boat, constructed using balsa with tissue cover, which is some 30-40 years old, hull still sound using the above mantra. 😎

Covering hull by manyboats Lieutenant   Posted: 4 months ago
To get the nice reverse curve in the bows, large blocks of balsa were used; luckily got given plenty of them years ago. I did use the thin ply supplied for the hull skin as replacing it is expensive, just recut to suit. After carving the bow shape and sanding everything true I covered the hull with fine woven glass cloth, after coating the hull with spray adhesive and letting it get tacky. After 2 coats of epoxy resin and lots of wet sanding, time to fit the rudder tube and prop shaft (with 3d printed oiler) and motor mounts, then the inside was sealed with epoxy.

Spraying the deck and superstructure. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
As the spray booth seems to be working as planned I next decided to put some primer on the deck and superstructure. Not much to say about this really, it's not a particularly creative or rewarding process but as this is the foundation of the paint process it's as important as the final coat and thus worth getting right from the outset. After masking off the various openings and the hull I put down the first coat of Halfords grey primer. I pre-warmed the can in a bucket of warm water for a short while and gave it a thorough shake for the prescribed two minutes and it seemed to go on very easily with an even coating. The booth is quite roomy and very easy to move the can around to get into the difficult areas without removing the boat from the booth to turn it around. A second was applied after about 15 minutes and the whole thing left to dry in the booth. I'll tackle the hull next but first I need to mark out the transom for some detailing and drill a hole into my precious hull for the water cooling outlet. Last picture is yours truly, first and last time you'll see me, much better looking with the mask on I've been told 👋

Epoxy coating the hull by boaty Lieutenant   Posted: 5 months ago
Looks like an excellent job and you'll have a good base for the final finish. I wish I had known about this technique two and a half years ago when I restored a 1962 34 inch Crash Tender which was advertised in the local paper. The boat had been daubed in yellow primer with the cabin roof missing and I stripped it down to the bare wood. The only consolation was that it had never had an I.C installed and so the interior was clean. The position of the holes in the motor mount appeared to indicate that the power unit had been one of the medium sized Taycol motors. 😊 Boaty.

Epoxy coating the hull by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi Paul. Ah yes, I know the stuff you mean, I recall using some when I had a loft conversion done. I will Google the product and see if I can find something suitable. I'll also have a look at your build blog again to see if I can find any pictures of your rescue netting. Thanks. Rob.

Epoxy coating the hull by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi Rob, the salvage nets.... I used the plastic coated stuff from hardware shops that you stuff into the gaps on a roof to stop birds. The "squares" are pretty much the correct shape, then you waft a hairdryer over them once installed, being plastic, they drop (start to melt!) to a very realistic shape over the supports! and shrink a bit, also, pretty much the right colour so don't need painting. Wish you could post up pics in a blog reply, then you would see mine Paul

Epoxy coating the hull by vosper Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 months ago
Looks lovely, I`m really enjoying your build.

Epoxy coating the hull by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
With the rubbing strakes fitted the hull can now receive two more coats of epoxy resin. The resin was mixed to the 30:100 ratio in sufficient quantity to coat the whole hull, and the 90 minute pot life meant that this could be done at a sensible pace. I found it best to apply a thin even coat and not to over-brush the resin, that way there were no runs and the brush did not drag, 'less is more' is always the case. The strakes absorb the resin quite well so they should be harder and more resistant to knocks. The resin was left to cure and harden for a couple of days before a rub down with a 400 grit wet & dry abrasive on a sanding block. The weave of the cloth is now fully covered and the resulting surface is remarkably smooth even at this stage. A third coat of resin builds up the finish layer and when dried resulted in a very pleasing mirror finish and the glassfibre cloth is now completely invisible! As satisfying as this shiny surface is it must be rubbed down to give a good surface for the primer paint to adhere to. I used a 1200 grit wet & dry paper with plenty of water to flatten and key the surface ready for when the painting process could be started.

Fibreglassing the hull bottom skins. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
The hull was prepared for fibreglassing, any pins are punched below the surface, filled and rubbed down with a fine grit paper. The wood does not need any sanding sealer applied as this will react with the epoxy resin. I cut the cloth roughly to size and shape and laid onto the bottom skin, the upper edge was lightly taped with masking tape to hold it in place. The resin is mixed to the correct 100:30 ratio and stirred well, the pot life is 95 minutes and will allow me to take my time to get this right. My previous test was very helpful in establishing a working sequence and I know how the materials will react when I start working them and how much time I have before the brush stops brushing and starts dragging the resin. The cloth is folded over to the other side of the keel and a thin coat of resin applied over the skin and the side of the keel and then the fabric is carefully folded back onto the wet resin. The resin immediately starts to draw the cloth to the surface and a very light brushing from the centre outwards helps to make it smooth and flat, the remaining resin can then be gently brushed onto the cloth so that there is an even coating. The cloth needed to be pushed up against the keel sides and I used a steel rule edge to get it into the junction of hull and keel. I decided to trim the cloth just at the bow along the line of the join in the skins whilst the rein was still wet so that I would have a clean butt join in the cloth in this region instead of an overlap, probably not really necessary as an overlap should sand down ok and that join will be covered by the chine stringer, but it seemed like a good idea anyway. I did a similar thing on the keel below the propshaft and around the skeg. This was done with a sharp new Stanley knife blade without disturbing the cloth and the excess cloth removed. Once the cloth is on you must resist the urge to brush on any more resin or smooth it out any more, this first resin coating only needs to be light as subsequent coats will build up and fill the cloth weave. I let it to cure overnight and the following day is still felt tacky so I erred on the side of caution and left it for a further day until it was entirely dry to the touch. The excess cloth was then trimmed back with a sharp blade. Caution, be careful because the cut edge of the cloth is itself very sharp, as I found out the hard way! Feeling quite satisfied with these initial results and a great deal more confident I repeated the process for the other bottom skin. At this rate of progress, allowing for proper curing of the resin, it will take 8 days just to cover all five faces of the hull with cloth alone, but a wise man said 'a job worth doing is a job worth doing well' 😄

Solent lifeboat by Kipper Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 10 months ago
Is this the right stuff? http://www.sheffieldfibreglass supplies.co.uk/shop/4572905647 /clr-crystal-clear-(slow)-lami nating-coating-epoxy -resin-uv-stable-(copy)/105455 43 I used a polyester resin on the inside of my Billings Norkap from these people, it was good stuff & the service was good but they are a bit more expensive.

Sealing hull by Haverlock Admiral   Posted: 11 months ago
its an old technique but nappy liners ( from chemist) and good old polyester resin. Will bond to your p38 so no worries there. Leave out the filler powder. You get a clear coating of polyester. I have used it on a balsa hull and was tough enough to survive several encounters ( this was back in the day that a clockwork escapement was the in thing). One press is left let go centre then press again for right .