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>> Home > Tags > coating

coating
boating
contra rotating
hull plating
coating
Fiberglassing by Trillium Commander   Posted: 30 days ago
I have been puzzled by conflicting statements on the web, some stating that adding resin and fibreglass will strengthen wooden construction, and others stating that it will not. For my own understanding I did some tests, which others may find interesting. These are not by any means scientific, and meant only as a guide for me in model construction. The results show that coating balsa with resin and fibreglass cloth does strengthen it. For those who want to see more detail, these are the results. Three separate strips of balsa, each 18" long by 1.5" wide were cut from a single sheet 36" long by 3" wide, 3/32" (2.4mm) thick. Each strip was placed on top of two supports 10" apart. A load was applied in increments to the centre of the span. After testing each strip in its uncoated condition, each one was coated with Deluxe Materials Eze-Kote resin, according to the maker's instructions, and a layer of fibreglass cloth applied on each side. The cloth was a piece I had spare so I don't know what weight it was, but I estimate between 1 and 1.5 oz per sq yd. After coating each strip was tested again. The results are shown in the chart. The lower the deflection when loaded, the stronger the strip. Although all strips were cut from one sheet, strip 3 was clearly stiffer and stronger than the other two in its uncoated state. It benefited least from the addition of the fibreglass. Strips 1 and 2 showed a significant increase in strength.

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by HoweGY177 Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi John, Suggest you sand as this will flatten the planking, no doubt each plank has curved slightly as the wood had dried out. Hoover out all the dust from the cracks and fill with a mahogany filler and re-flatten. The inside of the hull will also need varnishing to stop the wood drying out again. Would not advise wetting the planking to raise the grain as is normal practice as this might swell the wood and loose the filler. First use a good quality polyurathene varnish, brushed on but avoid runs, lightly sand to give a key before recoating. At this stage do not worry about the brush strokes showing. After at least 8 coats use wet and dry paper to sand the surface flat. Now apply a yacht varnish that does not dry so quickly and brush strokes will on the whole disappear. I suggest at least 3 coats to finish lightly wet and dry between coats. The more coats you give the deeper the shine. Use a good quality brush, a cheap brush drops hairs and does not give a smooth finish. If you look at my harbour and look at 'River Dance' you will see the finish this method can achieve. Good luck and hopes this helps. Vic

Finishing by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Martin, Bin round the Talisker ? 😉 @stwdv; ignore what comes next, go to the last paragraph 😎 The scale effect (as I understand it) has nothing or little to do with shine! It refers to lightening / fading the colour to fool the brain into thinking an object is further away than it is, and therefore think it is larger. Look at any landscape photo or 'in real', hills or forests further away look lighter or more grey than the green ones in the foreground. There are pros and cons to both as Dave says. Cellulose is history, except from some nitrated cellulose solvents. In the car restoring days of my youth I remember getting crinkling if I used cellulose thinners from a different manufacturer than the paint 😡 @stwdv: if you do it veeeery carefully in very very thin misted layers (barely wet) you CAN put put a different paint on others BUT you need flat of and prime the old paint first. Pay a bit more for your primer (universal types) and ensure that the coating is absolutely complete and totally dry and hardened. Some combinations work better than others. But essentially it is better not to mix and match. It's essenentially the thinners that does the damage, less is more sometimes! Try to avoid cheap aerosols, paying a bit more avoids a lot of heartache and extra work, or throwing things in the bin 😡 They tend to have a fairly wide spread on the nozzles which wastes a lot of paint through over-spray. They also tend to be a bit thick and difficult to control the flow which can cause 'orange peeling or even runs and 'splodges' if the spray stutters. To counteract this one has to spray thinner; i.e. back off more from the object - which causes more over-spray. 🤔 The little spray cans made for modellers are much better than this in all respects than the cheap jumbo cans from the hardware store. Get a decent air brush for the big bits, then you can control the paint viscosity, flow and size and shape of the spray cone. takes a bit of practice but is worth it if you intend to build more models. But I suspect you wanted tips on the preparation! So let's cut to the chase😉 Sanding and filling are the buzz words. Checking the surface very lightly with your fingertips is much more sensitive and accurate than relying on your eyes. 🤓 When you think you got it right put on a THIN coat of primer (matched type to the finishing paint!) and you will soon see the spots you missed! So back to the filling and sanding. Use a very fine filler at this stage. Prime again and flat it off with 240 to 400 wet'ndry. Take off the residue with a damp sponge and dry!!! Go round this loop a few times and when eyes and finger tips agree you are ready for the finishing colour coats. Thin, let dry. Check for blemishes. Fix if necessary, flat off -> next coat. ALWAYS take note of paint can drying / hardening notes. Don't rush or you'll end up doing it again 😉 Hope this helps, bon chance mon ami 😎Doug PS my larger model (mostly warships!) I use resin based paints in half litre cans from the DIY shops and an airbrush. They are hard wearing, come in all colours (RAL codes) and finishes and are easy to mix and thin with turps or white spirit. They take the enamel for detailing with no problems. Snags: take longer to dry, but they are hard wearing and cheaper than millions of 14ml cans 👍

Finishing by Westquay Captain   Posted: 2 months ago
I didn't realise that! Of course, if you live near Kings Langley you could pop in to see Mark Johnson and he'll actually MAKE the paint for you like he did for our historic wooden canal boat, Heather Bell. But I don't know if he's still trading from there. His company was Tramar Coatings. He advertised in Waterways World. I still have a tin of what he labelled Heather Bell Burgundy. It's on that wee Sea Urchin above. Lots of extra alkyd resins and finer pigments. He's a diamond. He used to call us on a Friday evening when his wife did arty things he had no time for and say, "Put kettle on". Half an hour later he'd turn up at the boatyard with fish and chips for three. We didn't have transport. Happy days. Martin

Thin Flat Timber by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Yep, Ikea wooden blinds are a good source of Lime wood, unfortunately they have stopped making that sort, so it is looking in skip times. Cut into strips and the coating sanded off are excellent for plank on frame boats, also good for deck planking and will take a stain. Alan

Fiberglassing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi chugalone 100 Welcome to the site. You can fibreglass with different types of resin and cloth. If you are making and casting a fibreglass hull use fibreglass matting but to cover a hull lightweight fibreglass cloth is best. This is the type shown in the suggested video. Resin can be epoxy or polyester based but the latter is generally cheaper and in my opinion is easier to use and doesn't require thinning with alcohol. It is sold as layup resin and is supplied with hardener. Do follow the instructions re quantity of each part and mix thoroughly. If you are using epoxy Iso Propyl Alcohol is the type to use and is clear. The video shows using a brush to apply the resin and whilst this is OK it will give a very thick and heavy coating. I use the brush to apply and then a credit card sized piece of plasticard to spread the resin over and into the surface of the cloth resulting in an almost opaque finish with the weave showing through. You do need to have a good surface to work with as any imperfections will show when the resin hardens. Once dry give a light sanding all over to remove any imperfections and fill any holes with car body filler and sand smooth. I then apply a very thin top coat of the resin using a brush. When dry use wet and dry to sand and if necessary apply further thin coats until you have the finish you require. I have a local supplier and if you visit the site http://www.resin-supplies.co.uk/product.htm all the resins/cloths etc are listed. Using Google should bring up a local supplier. you do need to follow the safety instructions to protect yourself and wear appropriate protection for your hands, eyes and breathing, it is also best to apply in a well ventilated area and not on a cold day. The end result will be well worth the effort to keep your tug waterproof. You could also paint the resin over thye inside of the hull to protect the wood from any water that doeos find its way inside. Dave

Bridge Build by Pav403 Commander   Posted: 5 months ago
Hello all, I've been busy with the Bridge build, this has proved a little tricky as the forward structure is at a slight angle when not on the ship. I've used a combination of 1/8 ply and 0.75mm plastic sheet. I needed the ply in this section as this will be where I will have hull access for batteries and needed the strength. The walls of the upper structure are plastic sheet which I think have come out well. There is still more to add (look out wings at the rear of the bridge need walls etc) I can the start to connect this to the decking before adding finer details. Coming on slowly is the hull, I will spend a bit more time here over the coming weeks to get it ready for sanding and then fibreglass coating. Good luck with your builds. Dave

To resin cover or not my ulises steam tug by Rochdaleblue Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi guys sorry if this is a newbie question but is it better to cover and epoxy my plank and frame hull or can I do as the instructions say and just seal fill and paint. Is the resin coating the only way to gets it really smooth.

water proofing by Peter47 Commander   Posted: 5 months ago
All of the above suggestion should work fine, but a good idea to remove as much H2O as possible after every sail, and leave hatches etc open at least over night, to allow for any remaining dampness to dissipate that may have by-passed the waterproof coating, Have a 1/24th scale Vosper Motor Torpedo boat, constructed using balsa with tissue cover, which is some 30-40 years old, hull still sound using the above mantra. 😎

Covering hull by manyboats Lieutenant   Posted: 6 months ago
To get the nice reverse curve in the bows, large blocks of balsa were used; luckily got given plenty of them years ago. I did use the thin ply supplied for the hull skin as replacing it is expensive, just recut to suit. After carving the bow shape and sanding everything true I covered the hull with fine woven glass cloth, after coating the hull with spray adhesive and letting it get tacky. After 2 coats of epoxy resin and lots of wet sanding, time to fit the rudder tube and prop shaft (with 3d printed oiler) and motor mounts, then the inside was sealed with epoxy.

Spraying the deck and superstructure. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
As the spray booth seems to be working as planned I next decided to put some primer on the deck and superstructure. Not much to say about this really, it's not a particularly creative or rewarding process but as this is the foundation of the paint process it's as important as the final coat and thus worth getting right from the outset. After masking off the various openings and the hull I put down the first coat of Halfords grey primer. I pre-warmed the can in a bucket of warm water for a short while and gave it a thorough shake for the prescribed two minutes and it seemed to go on very easily with an even coating. The booth is quite roomy and very easy to move the can around to get into the difficult areas without removing the boat from the booth to turn it around. A second was applied after about 15 minutes and the whole thing left to dry in the booth. I'll tackle the hull next but first I need to mark out the transom for some detailing and drill a hole into my precious hull for the water cooling outlet. Last picture is yours truly, first and last time you'll see me, much better looking with the mask on I've been told 👋

Epoxy coating the hull by boaty Lieutenant   Posted: 7 months ago
Looks like an excellent job and you'll have a good base for the final finish. I wish I had known about this technique two and a half years ago when I restored a 1962 34 inch Crash Tender which was advertised in the local paper. The boat had been daubed in yellow primer with the cabin roof missing and I stripped it down to the bare wood. The only consolation was that it had never had an I.C installed and so the interior was clean. The position of the holes in the motor mount appeared to indicate that the power unit had been one of the medium sized Taycol motors. 😊 Boaty.

Epoxy coating the hull by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Hi Paul. Ah yes, I know the stuff you mean, I recall using some when I had a loft conversion done. I will Google the product and see if I can find something suitable. I'll also have a look at your build blog again to see if I can find any pictures of your rescue netting. Thanks. Rob.

Epoxy coating the hull by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Hi Rob, the salvage nets.... I used the plastic coated stuff from hardware shops that you stuff into the gaps on a roof to stop birds. The "squares" are pretty much the correct shape, then you waft a hairdryer over them once installed, being plastic, they drop (start to melt!) to a very realistic shape over the supports! and shrink a bit, also, pretty much the right colour so don't need painting. Wish you could post up pics in a blog reply, then you would see mine Paul

Epoxy coating the hull by vosper Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 7 months ago
Looks lovely, I`m really enjoying your build.