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>> Home > Tags > coats

coats
coats
Deck Veener by canabus Commander   Posted: 2 days ago
Hi All After sanding the deck, I vanished with two coats that was OK. A bit of light sanding between coats and added another coat. Check it the next day and a lot of section on the bow the veneer had lifted !!! The stern section is OK. It's the outer veneer and it's all one piece, used the same glue. Very disappointed!!!! Canabus

Sea Queen refurbishment by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
Hi Doug Resin is heavy and applying by coating the inside of a boat will if the wood is porous absorb lots and greatly increase the weight. The thinner it is the more it will be absorbed. Layup resin is of a similar consistency to liquid brushing paint (not the gel type). It goes more pourable as the temperature increases. It is much thinner than the Isopon resin sold in many car repair packs. Adding styrene will thin the mixture allowing it to penetrate the glass cloth or matting. It is worked well into the mat to keep the weight to a minimum and any excess is mopped up with paper towels. After several coats the fibreglass will be formed and dries rock hard over a couple of days if the correct temperature is maintained. High temps will reduce the time but will be more difficult to work with as the gel stage will happen much quicker. Sorry to rabbit on a bit but I am trying to warn you that you may end up with a very heavy model if you do not use sparingly. If you can get the consistency similar to yacht varnish you can, like me, paint inside the boat including the underside of the deck. Paint out any runs and remove any excess with paper towels. You really only need a very thin coating. If you need to add strength then use some cloth or matting and work the resin well in and mop off any excess with paper towels. If you want to use your brushes and mixing pots again Acetone is the best cleaner but do keep it away from the resin. Both your alternatives would work just as well. It must be Summertime as we keep having rain showers! Cheers Dave

Dolphin 16 (19) by AllenA Commander   Posted: 27 days ago
[Score: 7/10] 19"/1100g Dolphin 16 (19) Capable of 10mph and a runtime of 20mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 30mm) Direct Drive to a Graupner Speed 600 8.4v (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (7.2v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Chinese 320amp (10Amps) ESC - Comments: This is the Meccano Magazine January 1967 issue plan, built in balsa. I didn't do a build blog as the construction is well covered on the net. Started with an A4 plan and used Excel to enlarge it onto 9 A4 sheets. I chose something simple as I haven't built a boat for thirty years. Really enjoyed the build and re-learning how to overcome the problems that always arise. She is oversized being 19" long and having a 7.5" beam. She sits nicely on the water and begins to plane. Will upgrade the the battery sometime. The decking is worktop edge strip pre-glued but in future will use the unglued strips. The cabin was adapted to extend over the whole boat as there was little space for modern electrics. I will add in and out air vents as the motor will need to breathe. Also, the true model should have an upper deck and windscreen and this will be easy to add sometime in the future. Really surprised and pleased with results from aliphatic wood glue. The finish, which I am not completely happy with, due mostly to my own impatience, was achieved with Ronseal multi purpose wood filler, lightweight fibreglass laminate with Eze-Kote. Paint is Acrylics and Marine varnish. The electrics are: Acoms AR 201 Reciever, Servo Acoms AS 12, Cheap Chinese ,supposedly, 320 amp ESC and 7.2v Nimh battery pack. The Graupner Speed 600 8.4v, bought it cheaply some months ago, was already in one of my boxes and you can see the adaptation required to fit it into the boat. All the Acoms controls I picked up at a boot sale including an Acoms Techniplus Alpha Transmitter on 27mhz. Inside I used Hammerite Smooth Gold as I couldn't buy silver. Modern Hammerite is thin and squeamish and took 3 coats to provide reasonable coverage. One final rant I do like the new silicon wires but they are a nightmare to solder to a motor. I think I will use soldered connectors in future. So there we are, first model in 30 years and now so many models to build and so little time. Lessons learned...... don't be impatient.

The electrics, drive & radio by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Doug and AllenA. Yes, it is indeed good old Hammerite 👍 I sealed all the interior surfaces with a couple of coats of sanding sealer and then two coats of the silver Hammerite on the hull bottom, sides and bulkheads and it gives a quite an attractive finish which is very durable. It was recommended by VMW in the build instructions and I'm very pleased with the result 😁

Proceedings so far by Alan999 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Have finished frame and first layer of veneer. Just gave boat sealant to give smooth finish.Then will use final of wide veneer ,rub down and plenty of coats of varnish.

Dumas Chris Craft finishing by Alan999 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
I am making a Riva boat from scratch. Just a set of plans. Where can I get the accessories to go on this boat . It's 32inches long by 9inches wide.I found the advice from one of your members just now of several coats of varnish very useful.

Skipjack class scamp by dasbootu47 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
Converted revell kit Im using an A1 downunder dive dystem Using a bag filling it with water Rattle can base coats then different tones airbrushed over that then brush weathering

Dumas Chris Craft finishing by captaindoug1 Apprentice   Posted: 2 months ago
Any good Spar varnish will work just give it about 7 coats with sanding in between coats with fine paper

The window glazing & frames. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
A full set of laser cut perspex windows is supplied in the VMW kit along with corresponding frames for all and they are all a pretty good fit in the window apertures of the engine room, forward cabin and wheel house rear walls, only requiring a light easing with a file for a secure fit. I left the protective film on the screens whilst gluing them in place with a very small amount of canopy glue applied to the window edges with a dressmaking pin and pressed into place so that they were flush with the outside of the cabin walls. The wheelhouse windows were a bit trickier as they are glued to the inside face of the panels and I had to remove the protective film around the edges of the outer face of the windows by running a fine sharp blade around the window aperture with the perspex held in place by hand. Canopy glue was then used very sparingly on the face of the perspex and the windows clamped in place. The central screen of the wheelhouse has the Kent Clearview in it and this needed to be carefully centred before fixing in place. When all had dried and set the protective films were peeled off to reveal nice clear ‘panes’ without any unsightly glue smudges. The CNC cut window frames are made from a flexible plastic material with accurate and well defined edges. They were all given a light sanding with abrasive paper as a key for the paint and were then laid out on a large piece of card paying particular attention to getting them the correct side up, in particular the wheelhouse frames which are ‘handed’ for either port or starboard. They were all held to the board with small pads of double sided foam tape and sprayed with two coats of Halfords metallic silver paint followed by two light coats of Halfords gloss lacquer. After a couple of days to dry they were removed from the board and fixed in place with canopy glue applied with a pin as very small dots around the inside face, aligned with masking tape ‘guides’ and a straight edge and then held in place with small tabs of masking tape. The installation of the glazing in the wheelhouse was made a lot easier because I had previously cut away some of the bulkhead and rear wall to give better access to the wheelhouse interior for detailing. This is not mentioned in the building instructions but is well worth doing for all the above reasons 😁

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by onetenor Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
A layer of the lightest glass cloth applied with Ronseal water based floor varnish / sealer.Rubbed down between coats. /Use enough coats to fill the weave / grain of the cloth . . this should still show the grain through the coats and leave a brilliant shine. this can be polished with T/cut once thoroughly hard if so desired.

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by John Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
I have spoken to the person who built the boat. It is based on a Vintage model boat company design. It was scratch built and is made of strips of mahogany as I originally suspected. Having looked at the Vintage model company site it most resembles a sea hornet, however another kit may have been available at the time it was made. The strips of Mahogany were the builder making use of the materials they had to hand at the time, hence the vertical strips! The interior is covered in fine fibreglass mesh and 3 thin coats of fibreglass resin. Work on the restoration continues!

Jet Sprint Boat by none Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
What was the problem first time round ? I have used plaster for making mould plugs for full sized parts on full sized boats. So long as it had at least 8 coats of mould release wax fully dried before polishing off and applying another coat. And finally a coat of pva release agent But using NO gelcoat Requires a few very thin coats of resin extra catalyst in each coat and allow to dry. before laying up. So Why No Gelcoat Because it adds weight to the hull of a racing model boat

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by HoweGY177 Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi John, Suggest you sand as this will flatten the planking, no doubt each plank has curved slightly as the wood had dried out. Hoover out all the dust from the cracks and fill with a mahogany filler and re-flatten. The inside of the hull will also need varnishing to stop the wood drying out again. Would not advise wetting the planking to raise the grain as is normal practice as this might swell the wood and loose the filler. First use a good quality polyurathene varnish, brushed on but avoid runs, lightly sand to give a key before recoating. At this stage do not worry about the brush strokes showing. After at least 8 coats use wet and dry paper to sand the surface flat. Now apply a yacht varnish that does not dry so quickly and brush strokes will on the whole disappear. I suggest at least 3 coats to finish lightly wet and dry between coats. The more coats you give the deeper the shine. Use a good quality brush, a cheap brush drops hairs and does not give a smooth finish. If you look at my harbour and look at 'River Dance' you will see the finish this method can achieve. Good luck and hopes this helps. Vic

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by Westquay Captain   Posted: 3 months ago
Can't really add much to what Doug has said as he's covered the ground pretty well. I don't ever use paint stripper these days. I once used it to remove factory paint from a Matchbox toy when I was making a series of "Code 3" modified steam lorries. Very oddly the paint strippered ones refused to dry when sprayed with cellulose paint (yes, it was available then no probs.) If I sprayed over the factory paint it dried in minutes as cellulose will do. I hadn't had the problem before, but I certainly got it this time and I haven't wanted to use it since. On wood anyway, I wouldn't use anything liquid as it could always soak in and do who knows what damage. I would scrape the finish on your wood , but make sure you have read up on how to sharpen a cabinet scraper. The shiny ones are pigs to sharpen because they are stainless and you cannot get an edge on stainless. The best knives are NT stainless. As an ex clay modeller for the car industry, I can assure you that all slicks, which we called the thin flat scrapers, were spring steel. They had a nice gun blue finish, but would go rusty if you didn't look after them between contracts. Because you really need two hands to properly control a scraper you'll need to find a good way to hold the boat, but a sweet little job like that Sea Hornet will sit twixt your knees. Because you have all those fractures in a vertical way along the grain, keep your scraper in a diagonal way or it will pick up wood grain and damage the model. It may work if you work down the grain, perpendicular to the deck, so you are crossing the fissures in the varnish. I would suggest that if you want a varnish finish you will need to go over the wood with epoxy and possibly a light weight (1oz.) glass cloth. This will stop any tendency to split again. Surprisingly it does allow the grain to show still and after you have flattened the epoxy, you can then apply 2 or 3 coats, rubbed down in between as Doug says with a very fine paper, of a spar varnish. I have a no name tin which I am using on general stuff, from garden items to the spars of my "Vanity" model. When I did a model of a Rive Aquarama Special, I used an International Spar Varnish which has a slightly golden tinge. Now, the hard part. No boat I can ever think of had wood in a vertical lay on the hull. Ecen double or Riva's triple layer was diagonal, finishing with incredibly well selected horizontal layers. The Sea Hornet would be improved no end, I am sure with a layer of horizontal nature. What passes for mahogany these days is horrible stuff (and I would say that on your boat could even be teak, which should never be varnished), so I always used Steamed pear veneer, which has no figure and a very close grain. Sanding sealer, then stain with you idea of mahogany(from an orangey colour to a rich reddy brown), then spar varnish. DO NOT stain the wood/veneer, always stain the first coats of finish. Riva do that too! I want to know what makes you say the mahogany is the only stuff on the hull. The Sea Hornet has 1/16th" ply skins like all Aerokits, so why not yours? Personally, I think it would look best if you painted the hull and spent your efforts on doing a nice laid deck in Pear veneer and caulking. A gloss black hull and a laid, varnished deck look very tasty, like a Greavette gent's Racer. Pic attached. Cheers, Martin https://model-boats.com/media/np/s/200/1494407879

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
By the way: 'flour paper' has a 'grit' probably of about 8000. DON'T use it wet or it'll fall to bits in your hand! 😎 It's also used LIGHTLY between coats of the finishing varnish to give that deep glass-like finish. 😎