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>> Home > Tags > cockpit

cockpit
cockpit
Nomenclature... by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
Ha Ha i got no credit for some things I came up with either Trouble is I can only remember the word FANTABULOUS which I invented by accident Fantastic and fabulous ame to mind together as I was talking and the hybrid word came out.🤓🤓 Re the BECS I know that but I couldn't explain it like you and was also asking what I thought Martin wanted to know. Floating arrays? Didn't TESLA do something similar during the RC boat . trials? Or was that actually the vessel itself? In one of my bigger boats I used FOUR ex GPO L/A cells which was enough with it's Ex forces motors to put a bone in the boat's teeth as the say. The boat ? RMV Mauritania 5 feet long but very light for it's size hence the need for the accumulator cells Balsa frames and sides with ceiling tile superstructure with balsa bracing. Free running so it was always heeling and with the bone creaming at the forefoot was very impressive. Destroyed by a guy collapsing on it. He'd only fainted but me pore owl gerl was just chips and snowflakes from one end to the other. Nothing to repair as there was nowt left to repair🤐 I kept one cell for starting glow motors and sold the rest at a good profit. Incidentally the motors were that good that when everyone found out where to get them They were sold out in 2 days with no more available anywhere Don't know what they were out of but from the overspray on them ( cockpit green but the Yank version -- we thought) we believed they were from planes. Very solid with 9 segment rotor . Totally enclosed. Airtight? presumably to prevent arcing igniting fumes. The rotorsegments? We found out when one didn't run so we stripped it and found them shining at us. Lovely tight windings. Thick with shellac/varnish. The problem? A stuck brush caused by a tight pivot Drop of 3 in one oil and a very light smear of grease cured it. The carbons were replaceable if you could make or find some. I found a firm in Formby that made and sold brushes for anything. I fixed son's Fiat automatic thenks to them. It had a magnetic clutch and the brushes were so worn we didn't know what the shape should be. Turned out to be about 2 inches long rectangles plain and simple. LOL. Wish I could find some of those lovely engineered motors now.😤👍

How to Create water tight seal? by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Any suggestions for creating a water tight seal? I am using clear hockey tape around the cabin roof which seems to keep water out, but over the open cockpit is where I am placing a cover which is suppose to keep water out of this area. I also poured polyurethane on the floorboards of the cockpit to provide a good seal and caulked the seams too.

Wianno Senior in the water by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
On the pond today. Sailing well, though took on water easily over the combing into the cockpit. So back home I added a clear covering which should take care of that problem. Also, added the Center board in the down position, which can be seen in the last picture in the clear water.

Mid Deck by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
An excellent Tutor Mike, many thanks👍 Will try to use these techniques on the cockpit of my Sea Scout. Possibly also on the fish cutter renovation as well. Old (Sea) Dog - new tricks!?😉 Cheers, Doug 😎

Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I also enjoy restorations, Colin...just as much. Every challenge is different. This Chris Craft is a restoration of an Aerokits Sea Urchin that cost me all of 99p. on ebay! But then i thought it would be better made up as a single cockpit smaller runabout, hence the Chris Craft with the steeply tumblehomed stern. My son has an Aerokits PTB and my other son has a Sea Rover. I also have a Sea Urchin and a Veron Veronica yacht, so yes, I do like the restoration of old items. I have a pre War Marblehead in the loft too! I've never been interested in the big ships and service vessels. Only inshore sailing fishing boats and classic speedboats. If I can help you out with any info or techniques, let me know. I have a lot of books on woodies and years as a professional modelmaker to call upon. Cheers, Martin

Fairey Hunsman renovation part 3 by CB90 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Thanks to ChrisF I am able to rebuild the boat with a different superstructure, but using the Huntsman 31 hull, he informed me of a Sport version of the 31 that had similar cabin as the 28. With some investigation. The New boat will now be '2017 Huntsman 31 Cockpit', this is a modern remake of the original design by a new setup. https://www.faireymarine.com/new-boat-showrooms/huntsman/201... style='background-color:yellow;'>cockpit-6084414/ Fairey 2017 Huntsman 31 cockpit, 2 berth classic sports cruiser Length: 31’3” Beam: 9’6” Draft: 2’10” Displacement: 4.5 Tons

Complete! by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
So, having had a few days off during the week when "The Boss" has been at work has given me enough hours to finish The Waveney off! Its been a hard week of making the small bits n bobs from scratch using a combination of balsa, carbon rod, brass rod, plastic tube, plastic sheet etc to make the radar array, antenna mast, extra cockpit details ect. The deck winch was made from large Servo output discs! The RNLI flag printed off Google! This has been followed by alot of detail painting and laquering. Anyway, I think I have just about exhausted as much detail as can be had at this scale and and happy to call completion! Only job to do now is get it in the Hot Tub and add the 2 Kg of ballast to get her on the waterline. On water photos and video to follow in the last update on this thread! as for next projects? I have the Aeronaut Pilot boat sat in the pile and the Fairy huntress 23 plan and wood pack on route from Sarik Hobbies!

Fairly Hunsman renovation part 1 by CB90 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Fairey Huntsman 31 aft cockpit 2 berth classic sports cruiser it will be then, sorry about the spelling will correct if possible. Length: 31’3” Beam: 9’6” Draft: 2’10” Displacement: 4.5 Tons

What is the optimum prop shaft angle? by boaty Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
The Nor Star Kingfisher is a heavy boat for its size and the positioning of the motor and prop shaft angle certainly matter. I built one in 1972 powered by a DC Sabre marine diesel (1.5cc) and the engine was in the cockpit which made it heavy at the bow. I was disappointed by its poor performance in relation to other boats of similar dimensions, in some cases these being powered by 1 cc diesels. It never crossed my mind that I could have used "ballast" and the boat was sold on 7 months later at a greatly reduced price. "Fools rush in where experts fear to tread." Boaty😎

Chris-Craft Special Runabout by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
OK, you know and I know that this is an Aerokits Sea Hornet, BUT, with a little reworking, it becomes a very passable Chris Craft Special (sometimes Custom) Runabout. One cockpit, long engine deck. I think it suits the Sea Hornet shape and proportions very well. Generally, I think too much is expected to be going on with a basic Hornet and the deck furniture is too simplistic. Also, don't be tempted to call this one a barrel back They had one continuous curve right over the transom from chine to chine, whereas this hull and the Special Runabout had a break, albeit a small one at the deck level. Anyway, I redecked the Hornet with 1/16th" ply, leaving the engine hatch long. I also had to make a small hatch at the stern to service the tiller and its connection. Then I realised I would never be able to get to the two starboard screws that hold the steering servo in, so a wee hatch went in over them too. That will be held in with a small magnet and just popped up from inside the engine 'ole hatch. Because the hull needed filling and various repairs, I decided to paint it, but veneer plank the deck. many Chris-Crafts were painted and I think this one in a nice off-white with a varnished Mahogany and pear deck will look just the job with nickel plated deck furniture, made in brass and nickel silver and plated in nickel to look like chrome in scale. Chrome is a) difficult to get these days and b) too bright and garish on a model. The hull has been epoxied and rubbed down then brush panted heavily with cellulose primer surfacer. This rubs down a treat ready for a sprayed enamel top coat or three. Cheers, Martin

nearing completion! by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
So, I have managed to crack on quite a bit this week. Ive done a heap at work on nights this week, followed by near enough a whole weekend of no interuptions as the "long haired Segeant Major" has been at her parents for the weekend!😁 it took a couple of days to build the coxswains console out of balsa and alot of fettling with plastitube and sheet, very please with the outcome. its not 100% scale acurate as is the rest of the model, but close enough to give a good representation of the wheelhouse contents. Just the Coxswain and seat to build and paint for a completed wheelhouse. The rest of the weekend has seen the cockpit just about finished, painted and laquered. So, to complete the model the following items need to be built, painted and fitted. Radar mount and radar, instrument dials, cockpit glazing, antenna mast and rigging, towing bitt, rear cockpit railing and winch, hull grab ropes, anchor, and finally about 2 kilos of lead ballast to get her sitting right on the water. I reckon another week to 10 days for a completed model!

Mahogany in Scale by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Maybe I should write one, eh, Colin? For the scratchbuilders among us. A treatise on brass bashing and woodwork. Nobody would be interested. I've just epoxied my Sea Hornet, which I'm modifying as a Chris Craft Custom Runabout. One cockpit, big hatch. Cost me 99p off ebay a few years ago. I just had to scrape all the old red paint off it as it wanted to fall off anyway! Then a huge rub down, a wipe with cellulose thinner and a coat of epoxy applied with a square of styrene sheet because I couldn't find an old credit card on the quick, just as good though. Next, rub down and 2 coats of cellulose primer surfacer, then the top coats. This one is to be one of the painted CCs. There were quite a few. But the deck will be veneered in the correct style and varnished. Martin

Aft cockpit deck by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I first cut the base material to size allowing a card thickness all round for final clearances. The lower deck has a number of features in it that need to be measured. I took dimensions from the plans and marked out the base. Again following the upper deck which has a mahogany boarder I cut and planed a further amount of 6mm x 1.5 strips of material. I started by outlining the mahogany boarders, Some years ago I made a mitring device for picture framing which has come in very handy for doing the corners. Having all the pieces cut they are then glued and temporally pinned in position until set. The next job is to prepare all the edges with black card and then measuring each plank across the width starting from the centre line. I must take into account how the planks sit against main access hatch and the battery hatch opening however, all seems to look good but until each plank is positioned and glued with its caulk divider it’s difficult to tell. When preparing each plank I first cut each piece oversize with wire cutters then using the disc sander I trim square one end, then place in position and mark for final length and finish again on the disc sander giving each plank a nice push fit Because lime planking varies in colour across a batch I numbered each plank across the deck varying the pattern of colours as I cut each to length. Next I cut a number of card pieces to length and start to glue (using Aliphatic glue), plank, followed by card filler across the half width, then repeat the other side. Finally the battery hatch and main access hatch are treated in the same manner. Next comes the finishing , I use a very fine grade on my belt sander (I attach a block on the underside of the main access deck to control the sanding process) to remove the majority of excess irregularities followed by an orbital sander for a fine finish. If there is any staining by the black card residue I simply remove it with a pencil rubber. Next I put the nail holes in again using the jig I made to ensure uniform spacing and then gave a coat of sanding sealer. Final finishing will be done as a complete assembly. Preparation of the side panels is the next process before final assembly

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by astromorg Seaman   Posted: 2 months ago
Interesting, valuable photos and drawings. More like that would be welcomed by many of us. As it would have been illegal not to have a stern light on vessels like these, for both normal passage and also when towing, perhaps that photo without one was during build before it was fitted? No draft marks either. The photo of 93 secured at Vospers (therefore probably before acceptance) shows the stern light while the early type fire monitors also show the date of the photo was early on. I also note one drawing shows the breach hose connectors aft of the cockpit that indicate it to be of later than original build. Similarly the cockpit roof cleats have been re-positioned athwartships rather than the original two being fore-and-aft. Considering their short operational life, it's surprising how many detail changes were made when all the available documentary evidence is studied! You'd think that after 60+ years all the answers would be known for sure by now!

The Crew(s)!! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Oh Sh....ugar, DHL just told me the crews are reporting for duty tomorrow already an' I ain't made the cockpit furniture yet 😲