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>> Home > Tags > cockpit

cockpit
cockpit
Aft cockpit deck by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
I first cut the base material to size allowing a card thickness all round for final clearances. The lower deck has a number of features in it that need to be measured. I took dimensions from the plans and marked out the base. Again following the upper deck which has a mahogany boarder I cut and planed a further amount of 6mm x 1.5 strips of material. I started by outlining the mahogany boarders, Some years ago I made a mitring device for picture framing which has come in very handy for doing the corners. Having all the pieces cut they are then glued and temporally pinned in position until set. The next job is to prepare all the edges with black card and then measuring each plank across the width starting from the centre line. I must take into account how the planks sit against main access hatch and the battery hatch opening however, all seems to look good but until each plank is positioned and glued with its caulk divider it’s difficult to tell. When preparing each plank I first cut each piece oversize with wire cutters then using the disc sander I trim square one end, then place in position and mark for final length and finish again on the disc sander giving each plank a nice push fit Because lime planking varies in colour across a batch I numbered each plank across the deck varying the pattern of colours as I cut each to length. Next I cut a number of card pieces to length and start to glue (using Aliphatic glue), plank, followed by card filler across the half width, then repeat the other side. Finally the battery hatch and main access hatch are treated in the same manner. Next comes the finishing , I use a very fine grade on my belt sander (I attach a block on the underside of the main access deck to control the sanding process) to remove the majority of excess irregularities followed by an orbital sander for a fine finish. If there is any staining by the black card residue I simply remove it with a pencil rubber. Next I put the nail holes in again using the jig I made to ensure uniform spacing and then gave a coat of sanding sealer. Final finishing will be done as a complete assembly. Preparation of the side panels is the next process before final assembly

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by astromorg Seaman   Posted: 8 days ago
Interesting, valuable photos and drawings. More like that would be welcomed by many of us. As it would have been illegal not to have a stern light on vessels like these, for both normal passage and also when towing, perhaps that photo without one was during build before it was fitted? No draft marks either. The photo of 93 secured at Vospers (therefore probably before acceptance) shows the stern light while the early type fire monitors also show the date of the photo was early on. I also note one drawing shows the breach hose connectors aft of the cockpit that indicate it to be of later than original build. Similarly the cockpit roof cleats have been re-positioned athwartships rather than the original two being fore-and-aft. Considering their short operational life, it's surprising how many detail changes were made when all the available documentary evidence is studied! You'd think that after 60+ years all the answers would be known for sure by now!

The Crew(s)!! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
Oh Sh....ugar, DHL just told me the crews are reporting for duty tomorrow already an' I ain't made the cockpit furniture yet 😲

Final Finishing before Sea trials ;-) by Donnieboy Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
For people to occupy the cockpit I usually peruse the toy section of the Dollar store.Then modify them with Milliput.I don't know if you have any comparable store over there.It's a lot less expensive than the hobby shops.The other bits and pieces I just have to remember what cabinet and drawer they are in.

Final Finishing before Sea trials ;-) by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
Thanks Donnie, 👍 was worth the effort and generous dollops of patience! And I learned a lot along the way. I included also the 'bloopers' in my blog😡 And you're dead right, if the sun's out it bounces off her quite nicely😊 I have no idea what to do with the cockpit though🤔 I'm more used to the bridges of naval ships! All suggestions (printable ones please, all others in a sealed envelope to ...😉) will be gratefully received! Cheers, Doug 😎

Final Finishing before Sea trials ;-) by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
A quick Flashback to May 😲 Got sidetracked with 'lectrickery' an' stuff🤔 Hull was given a final spray top coat and gloss clear lacquer coat. All flatted back in between coats with 3000 grit Tamiya W&D sponges. Used wet with a drop of liquid soap. Then a few hours of polishing with car paint cutting compound and finally with 'anti hologram' polish until it feels like glass.😊 Same polishing procedure for the decks and cabin sides. Fitted a few deck fittings; tank filler caps, which also hold the aft deck down, and 'Jam' cleats fore and aft. Both from the 'Riva' range from Krick. Apart from the cockpit she's done! Need suitable scale crew and cockpit furniture now. Ship's wheel I have but that's it so far. Last pic is a reminder of how the 'old girl' started out last year, after 25 years of neglect in the cellar! Sea Trial soon. Cheers, All, Doug 😎

Emerald - "Round the Word" ocean racing yacht. by East-RN Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 15 days ago
Main Sheet Modification: Yachts of this nature, would be fitted with a Traveller, which would be used to help shape the Main Sail. Also, the route of the main sheet, has a lot of twists and turns to get out of the cabin and up to the Boom. Plus, it has to pass through the tube and bend at its edge. The starting point of the control would be from the cockpit, especially if it is a Single Handed yacht. The ideal place for the traveller, would be on the roof of the cabin. To keep physical disruption to a minimum, I decided to use the original boom running gear pulleys. The termination of the MainSheet would now be at the traveller on the cabin. 1. The cleat was removed from the cockpit, and the eye bolt was replaced by an S hook, screwed to the cockpit deck( see picture 1). 2. A hole was drilled in the cockpit, adjacent to the cabin hatch, and in a direct line with the main Sheet control system. This will allow the main Sheet to pass directly from the cleat. Through the pulley assembly (withought going round the pulley), and straight aft to the cockpit. 3. A brass tube was glued into the hole, flush with the cockpit surface and extending inside, towards the mainsheet control system (see pictures 1 and 2). 4. The Traveller was formed from a length of brass rod, (approx 300mm long), formed to the same curve as the cabin roof. Slide the pulley onto the rod so that it runs freely. Make a 90 degree bend at each end, the length of the traveller apart. These 2 legs will pass down into the cabin roof, leaving about 10 mm for the pulley to run from end to end. Plus about 10mm at each end of the rod, which will be bent up against the inside of the roof and glued. (see picture 3 & 4). 5. Mark the cabin roof where the traveller is to be mounted. I chose to mount the traveller directly under the boom pulley. I have made a revised sketch which is taken from the original plans for guidance. See picture 5. Note: make sure the pulley is mounted on the rod between the two bends. 6. Drill the holes in the cabin, pass the ends of the rod through the holes. I put a 10mm piece of wood under the traveller rod, next to the hole. This allows you to hold it securely, while you bend the rod out, on the inside of the cabin. Apply plent of glue or resin to secure it. Do the same at the other end of the rod, and leave to set. With the cockpit removed, and the mainsheet control system in place, take the free end of the main sheet and pass it through the new hole in the cockpit. The cockpit can be secured by the 4 locking pulleys. Now pass the mainsheet through the S hook and up to the boom. Adjust the S hook to suitable angle. When the yacht is rigged, the mainsheet is passed up to the end of the boom pulley, along the boom, over the pulley and down to the traveller pulley. With the tx/ex active, pull the mainsheet right in, and the trim set right out (this allows for final tightening).Secure the mainsheet to the eye of the pulley, ( I use a figure of 8 knot ). Now adjust the trim on the joystick to pull the main Sail tight. Finally, run the servo right out, and back in a few times, to make sure it works properly. Move the boat round so the wind cones from a different angle, and watch the traveller as the sail is pulled in and out. Now you are ready to sail. May your wake be long and straight. Ray 😎

Aerokits MTB, what is it?... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
Hi Martin and here extracts from the USN Bureau Of Ships Plans. Plus some painting inspiration😉 and cockpit and stern detail. Have fun, cheers Doug😎

Emerald - "Round the Word" ocean racing yacht. by East-RN Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 16 days ago
Auto Bailout Modification. 1. I drilled small holes in the lower corners of the cockpit wells, opposite each other. These were then connected together with some small brass tube. This was to allow the water to flow from the front cockpit to the rear cockpit. (See pictures 1 and 2). 2. Two more holes were drilled in the rear cockpit, in the outer corners further aft. these were fitted with brass tube stubs. These were to take the plastic tube, which runs to the nozzles fitted into the hull (see picture 3 and 4). 3. To ensure the water would not flow into the boat, while stationary, the tubes were run through small eyelets on the under side of the deck(see picture 5). 4. Small holes were drilled in the hull and brass tubes were cut and bent, so that they would pass down through the hole in the hull, and lay flush against the hull, with the opening facing aft(see picture 6 and 9). 5. On the outer hull, the tube is built up, and covered in a cone shape, so the tube opening is the widest part of the cone and flush( see picture 7 & 8). 6. When the tubes are fitted to the stubs on the aft cockpit, and the cockpit secured in the yacht, the bale out is complete. Principle: While the boat is still and on an even keel, the cockpit floor is above the waterline, the tubes raise up to the deck level which prevents the water from flowing up and into the yacht. When the yacht starts to move under sail, the water flowing over the outlet nozzle is forced out by the cone, and creates a small vacuum at the nozzle opening, which draws any water in the cockpit through the tube and out through the nozzle. During a gust or strong winds, the yacht will heel over more. This will bring all the cockpit water to the lower side bailout tube, and be drawn out by the vacuum. When the yacht slows, and becomes even keeled, the cockpit will have been emptied. During heavy gusts, I found that the yacht will heel excessively, and if the waves are high enough, the cockpit will take some water over the deck. This is why I fitted the bailout device. So after a long sail in heavy weather, a long cruise back to shore on a broad reach and more even keel, will ensure the cockpit is dry. Happy Cruising

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Unless described as flat, paint was more often a brighter satin than matt and rarely actual gloss. White will always have been an off white as the components of paints were such that it was not possible to get a really bright white. I know that for a fact as my grandad always made his own and until PEP in the mid 60s (Plastic Emulsion Paint) there was no such thing as brilliant or appliance white. Unfortunately getting an decent off white is not easy these days since Plastikote went acrylic and their previously excellent paints started eating themselves on recoating. I now use enamels exclusively. They are densely pigmented, flexible and modern enamels dry pretty quickly. I am using a black enamel primer on my Crash Tender, which I will then spray with black "gloss" from the same range, which, once thinned with white spirit, will dry a little less than glossy. I still don't have a matt brick red for the undersides, but it can be made matt-ish with a careful rub down with 1000 grit wet and dry used wet and soapy, but be careful not to sand through, so very lightly does it, even 1000 grit can cut well when new. Decks were said to be Cerrux Light Deck Grey, anti-slip, which means a textured surface. That would be darker looking due to the surface texture's way with the light. The cabin sides were described as "smooth", i.e. same as the decks but not anti-slip. The roofs? Well, on Vosper's drawing "white" is crossed through and "Grey" written in. But, some pics do look white, the best pics look darker by a whisker than the sides and the roofs are clearly textured as they show evidence, as do the decks, of filth which will sit in the texture. You choose. NOBODY has yet given us chapter and verse. The fact is, an already very handsome boat looks so very pretty with white roofs. But they too should be off white if you can get it! Good luck. Fittings, btw can be had from SLEC in Watton in white metal. Basically the old Yeoman fittings, masters now owned by IP Engineering who bought them to cast when they owned Vintage Model Boat Company. Now they've sold that to SLEC, but I don't think SLEC have white metal casting facilities, so probably cast by Ivor still. I have just had a set for my birthday and they're excellent. They do need careful cleaning up as in mould lines need to be filed/scraped/sanded to a decent finish and then given good primered surface. No hook though, but it does include nav and riding lights. This site also has masts for sale in plastic, but I made my own in brass as I will the hook and davit. I have also just had a set of crew figures cast from my patterns and they will be available soon...a driver(Helm), a boss with binoculars and a lazy slob laying around in the after cockpit. Needs a roll-up to finish his look. No idea of price yet as don't know how much rubber to mould or resin to cast for a set. Yes, 1/16th scale. All this to finish a model I had 55 years ago! But I reckon it deserves it. Martin

Spektrum, new, useless... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Hi John, yes I'm sure I saw that story on the 'Mayday - Alarm in Cockpit' series. A sobering tale, like the cheap 'forged' false pylon bolts that caused a 777 to loose an engine 😲 Cheers, Doug 😎

Robbe Smaragd by East-RN Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 24 days ago
Hi Doug. Yes, I plan to take some pictures/video and post them. Primarily, I was hoping to help NPJ with his request for original plans etc. I realise it was last October when he requested them. I have made some changes to the main sheet control, planking and windows on the Cabin and an auto bailout on the cockpit wells. He may be interested in those as well. I have not met any other owners of this Classic model. It would be good to meet up with other owners and get them Cruising across a reasonable sized stretch of water (Not Racing). I have sailed and raced Dingy's and Catamarans, and this model is as close the real thing as I have experienced, and a good trainer for anyone learning how to manipulate and set sails, as well as use of the rudder. Keep Upright 😁😎 Ray

Smaragd by East-RN Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 24 days ago
[Score: 10/10] 55"/12000g Smaragd Capable of 5mph and a runtime of 120mins Powered by NiCad (9.6v) 2Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Futaba F-14 Marine TX/RX. Twin Stick operating Main Sail winch and Forsail winch. Reversing switch to reverse the Forsail winch when Tacking. ESC - Comments: 1:10 scale model of a "Round the World" ocean racing Yatch. I have the Genoa kit fitted and the Blister kit fitted. While sailing in rough weather, a certain amount of water built up in the cockpits, so I fitted an autobailer, to syphon it away without docking. The other modification is to the main Sail sheeting. Instead of the the main sheet coming up through the deck, and along the boom and fixed to the cleat in the cockpit! I ran the main sheet directly into the cockpit, across a pulley and up to the boom. Along the boom and down to a traveller mounted on the cabin roof. Allowing the main Sail to swing out, but stay taught, and then giving twist to the Sail when on a broad reach. See posted pictures.

"Jessica" A Sea Scout renovation by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 5/10] 24"/2000g "Jessica" A Sea Scout renovation Single Propellor (3 Blade 35mm) Direct Drive to a Propdrive 2830 1000kV (3 Blade) Powered by LiPoly (11.1v) 4Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Quikrun 16BL30 Hobbywing (30Amps) ESC - Comments: Originally built by my Dad in the early sixties, fitted then with a Taycol Target and two very wet lead acid accumulators. First renovation about 26 years ago for my daughter Jessica, fitted with a 6V Decaperm. Performance was VERY sedate. Perhaps fitting for a Broads Cruiser? The Taycol will now go into the Danish fish cutter I am currently renovating. First two pics show her condition, incl. engine room, last year after about 25 years in the cellar. Last three pictures show current condition after extensive renovation, see 'Build Blog Jessica' and refit. Video shows her Sea Trial end of May https://youtu.be/b0BWJ3duzDw Now just cockpit fit to do and suitable crew to find. Can't 'select' Speed here as she wasn't equipped with GPS! But quick! Now she planes well so I guess I've turned her into a Sport Fishing Boat!? Rating I also can't select for myself, that's something for you guys to do! ;-)

54 year old Crash Tender by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I would like first to say that this is NOT a restoration. It has always been mine and followed me around all those years, been used extensively on Oyster beds on the Essex coast and Valentine's Park in Ilford, Essex...even the great Victoria Park, of which my Granddad was a founder member. It has eaten its way through lantern batteries out of number which my Dad, who was in the business could magic from thin air. There was always a nook in the boot of the Triumph Town and Country saloon and then the Austin Westminster for another new lantern battery, which the Taycol would destroy in about 20 intermittent minutes of left, centre, right, centre from the REP single channel gear. How I wish I still had that, but it was stolen. The REP, that is, the Taycol remains, restored and cleaned and like new again waiting to go back in the boat. I finally decided I should finish it. My wife bought me a set of white metal fittings by Yeoman out of IP Engineering, so I have no excuse. Not that I need one. It has suffered a bit over that half a century, losing odd panels, but they are easily remade and replaced. First, I had to clean out the insides of the detritus and loft life of decades. Vacuuming, scraping with a pointy thing and brushing with a stiff brush, followed by more vacuuming using a clever attachment that my dear wife thought might be useful and it was, being at least a dozen stiff, but small diameter tubes poking out of the end of a nozzle. It both pokes and nudges the old dirt and dust and sucks it away. After that the old thin mahogany deck planks, my friend thought to add in the late 60s were removed and saved where salvageable as I quite like them for trim on other boats. The deck was rather brutalised with a coarse rasp and any loose nails punched back in flush or slightly below. Then some way too old, but still good, epoxy (WEST) was used to slar all over the decks and most of the insides, even some of the cabin sides. That will be finished before dark today. I can hardly believe the epoxy still works, but it does, perfectly and so is pressed into use. In this warm weather it set very quickly. I did my usual trick of squeegeeing it on into the grain with an old credit card or Gummi, which is a sample block of silicon. Styrene will also do. I use some spare 2mm stuff I was given (that guy at IP Engineering again). The roofs had already been corrected the other evening and heavily cellulose sanding sealed. The forward cabin removeable roof was unwarped by having a tight fitting diagonal piece of pear pressed in under the top skin and glued. The new hatch on that roof was made and the shape of the roof and hatch runners changed slightly, as per drawings from this site. Here are pics. of the work today. The above resinning, the remade cabin panels a new wheelhouse bulkhead and the tow hook base panel, finally a new aft cockpit rear coaming which it never had but should have. Cheers, Martin