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>> Home > Tags > computer

computer
computer
getting a bit slow?... by Westquay Admiral   Posted: 2 days ago
Oh Doug, I thought you would understand. I am not denegrating kit builders. I, too, build the occasional kit to save time. No,no, I was denegrating the old boys who don't EVEN kit build, then brag about it, about what it's all cost them. That is what is so bloody pointless to me. Obviously I am grateful for kit builders as that's how I made my living for years, making patterns for kits. But to pay over the odds for a kit and all its bits and then brag about how much it all cost seems to me utterly stupid. Building a kit is a perfectly good way to either save time or gather a collection quickly and just to make my point, I still get a kick out of opening the box on a new kit (Airfix 1/48th scale Lightning for instance) like I did as a kid. I am well aware of the skills of dealing with photoetch, although I doubt I could manage such tiny scales as you mention. I have always done the artwork for my own photo-etch, but now it's all done on computers, so I no longer have any dealings with it. For the kind of inshore craft I have always been a fan of, 1/48th is quite small. Small enough for me anyway. And a year after (is it) I am back with the boats as explained above. I do other things when the weather is not so great. I can't remember what went on a year ago and I have never been bored in my life except when forced to watch television, football, modern pop music or money programmes. I ALWAYS have something to do, I just don't always know much about aspects of it, which is why I come on here and ask. I ain't proud. I was explaining why, for me, model railways is now a no-no and why my wall sign is very much a case of QED. I do wish I could help more people with constructional stuff, that I DO know about to in some way pay back for the help I have recieved from others on topics I find mystifying. If you don't like it, so be it. I'll go again and not return. It's a shame to be what seems to be willfully misunderstood, especially by someone I thought I had a good relationship with. Cheers, Martin

Rudders and propeller by teejay Lieutenant   Posted: 19 days ago
Hi all for the second blog report on the schenllboot I am going to go over the rudder an propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat , these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts .which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel)and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum power mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The forth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I have to ask for some help could any one advise me on the length of propeller shafts , I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft but port and starboard will have to be longer . and I also need advice on selecting the motors , I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.

HMS HOOD by Trumpeter by cormorant Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Peter If you look at this website http://www.hmshood.com/hoodtoday/models/trumpeter/trumpeter2... you will see that there are enough incorrect items to drive you mad. I have decided to get it as accurate as the kit allows. I have installed a Graupner 6v smoke generator in each funnel with a computer fan at the base of each - yet to be tested. I propose to switch them on and off with a receiver controlled switch. I would like to be able to colour the smoke but have yet to find the correct formula. Steve

site surgestions by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Agree Fred, I have to admit I have a Kindle Fire, but only so I can take a library of Clive Cussler with me on holiday. 😉 Sorry to hear of your HP problems, my last HP computer was an HP85 around 1975! The one with the little built in B/W screen and the Ski game! Since Dave died HP seems to have gone downhill 🤔 For the last 25 years or so I have only used DELL laptops, private and business machines, no problems. The PC I am using now is also a Dell workstation. And No I don't have shares or a franchise😉 There are today some really good notebooks on the market, not much bigger or heavier, than tablets but with much better, i.e. complete, operating systems. Acer for instance. I'm still not convinced by the tablet marketing, lots of promises but in practise not much delivery. And Apple I've never liked, full of stuff I don't need and links to other businesses I certainly don't want! I was an Atari fan in the early days. Glad to hear that some of my waffling has been useful 😊 Greetings from an Old Sea Dog as me old Mum calls me, cheers Doug 😎

Update on the Tug Brooklyn! by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
OK, After having technical problem with my computer and repairing such problems. I can now continue with my build! I made a tugs beard for the Brooklyn. This I made 2 yrs before I ever knew I would get the Tug! Who knew it would come in handy. I have assembled the sand buckets stands! For fire fighting. I also assembled the galley smoke stack as well. Behind the galley smoke stack you can see. The fire fighting hose reel and it's stand! If you look down at the cabin doors. You can see the wooden hinges. I glued one at a time!

Sanding down. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Peter, wow 24 ltr tank 😲 mine's only about 10max I think. Yep regulator and oil / water strippers are indispensable for best results 👍 Sounds like you have a nice setup there. Mine is the Revell Master Class with all the trimmings so sort of semi-pro 😉 I also have two 'guns' (one single action and one double action) for large and small quantities and a variety of needles and jets from fine line (without the guts to test it yet😁) to large areas like hulls. If you go to a DIY place that the pros also go to (Building Supplies?) you should find acrylics in half and 1ltr cans. For my 'grey ladies' (up to 1.5m long) I use the 1/2 ltr cans of RAL standard colours, e.g. RAL 1001 is medium navy grey, RAL 7035 is a lighter grey more like the RN hull colour. 1/2 litre thinned to the consistency of milk (low fat😉) does a lot of hulls and you don't want it to harden in the can do you! 😡 A good shop should be able to mix any colour you want. Take the paint chart with you and the mixer should be able to look up the mix code on a computer. If he hasn't got one - go somewhere else!! You should also find the primer filler there (usually only grey I'm afraid), if not go to a pro car supplies shop - you'll find the Protection Lacquer there as well. Cheers Doug 😎

HMS HOOD by Trumpeter by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Peter, Thank you! Happy to help. But I don't claim to know everything😉 I stay out of discussions on things which are not my forte; e.g. yachts and other sailing craft, apart from admiring the woodwork involved, or subs - where I am still at the bottom of the learning curve, but I've been a fan of WW2 warships for years and enjoy researching the history and building them. Been fiddlin' with computers since the end of the sixties! They got a lot smaller since then 😁 I envy you being able to visit the Heywood show 😡 Sorry the 'Extra Time' site has been deleted by FIFA (I couldn't afford the million 'Fee' they wanted😁) Happy building and sailing, cheers Doug 😎

Command Boat 90 by CB90 Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Scratch built at 12th scale from pictures and profiles of the internet. The boat was originally built in Sweden a class of fast military assault craft originally developed for the Swedish Navy by Dockstavarvet Speed: 40 knots (74 km/h) Draught: 0.8 m (2 ft 7 in) Length: 15.9 m (52 ft) Overall; 14.9 (48') Complement: 3 (two officers and one engineer); Up to 21 amphibious troops with full equipment Armament: 3 × Browning M2HB machine guns; 1 × Mk 19 grenade launcher; 4 naval mines or 6 depth charges . The Model I was attracted to this boat due to its great performance and maneuverability, this was mainly due to the use of twin water jets as the main propulsion, this is a trade off with efficiency. So my start point was to collect as much information as possible about the boat this involved collecting pictures and profiles of the craft from various sources. http://www.dockstavarvet.se/products/combat-and-patrol-boats... Eventually I found some plans of sort :- http://laurell.today/boats/combat/plans.html My Dad was a boat builder in the days of wooden yachts, and had showed me how to make plans and frames from a line drawing. I went about this first by creating a prototype about 24 in long out of light ply. I then created full size plans of the model to be made. Pictures of small prototype finally painted plain green. The Main model Used my computer to print out the frames onto paper, cut them out and used them as templates for the ply ribs. The construction was simple chine style, with 1.5 mm ply. I tried to build jet drives but failed to produce a effective unit. So reverted to propshafts which worked out well with better control and the boat can spin on it own axis by putting one engine in reverse the other in forward and adjusting the twin rudders. That it for now, hope it was of some interest

emails by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I did all the same checks. But not Outlook, I avoid that like the plague! Now seems to be working again😊 HNC electronics, 40 years naval communication engineering, was great fun (most of the time!). Integrating internal networks and external comms and collocating so many antennas on board were the main challenges. Enjoyed it immensely. Started on computers with an 8 Bit paper punch tape fed Elliot 803 in the seventies. It would fill my living room 😲 Ciao, Doug 😎

Help by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Gerry, welcome aboard 👍 Don't mind some of our crustier Fleet Admirals😉, they mean well and have a wealth of knowledge 😉 First some basics (and forgive me if I'm preaching to the converted but the query was a bit bald to say the least!)! - 1 What experience do you have with RC boats? 2 Brushed or brushless motors? Are you aware of the pros and cons? 3 Battery: are you thinking NiMH or LiPO? Are you equipped for LiPOs, i.e. appropriate charger? 3 I assume you mean the ELCO 80 foot Patrol Torpedo Boat (PTB)? Which at 1:32 would give a model of around 30 inches. Please confirm or let us know what original type the model should represent. 4 Are you scratch building from a plan, or from a kit? If a kit which one? Maker? Sorry for all the questions, but it's like computers; nothing in = nothing out!🤔 Some general rules (I know, rules are made to be bent til' they break!😉) If you go brushed motors there is a neat dual ESC + rudder mixer on the market where you can also connect a third separate ESC for the centre motor, to give that extra OOOMPH at Full Ahead 😊 If you go brushless the basic rule is props no larger than the diameter of the motor. And use an out runner, good torque and SHOVE! Inrunners are mostly for the fly boys 😉 Guideline: last year I bought a 28" LoA model of an ELCO 80 footer PTB from another member. It's fitted with 2 x 28xx brushless motors and 30mm 3 blade screws and 2 x HobbyKing XC-10A ESCs. The builder who sold it to me said it is 'almost uncontrollable'! Whatever you do have fun with it, but if in doubt ASK, before you dump money in the boating lake! 🤔 Good luck and best regards, Doug 😎

Is this scratch built by Keystone Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
Just back from our annual Gambia trip where I met up with a lad called Joseph. He was very interested in model boats and proudly showed me his effort to make an electric powered model. The whole thing was built from a form of palm wood and was to be powered by a car wiper motor. The only tools used have been, a tenon saw, 1 Half inch firmer chisel, penknife an sandpaper. The propeller is the fan from an old computer. It must qualify as scratch built but shows the enthusiasm of a young man to get what he wants. Where are our youngsters showing the same in our hobby.

Tempory computer by Colin H. Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Ron, Thanks for your comments. The small Tug (EMANUEL) is 16" long, scale unknown. No crew as yet, but will try some of my model railway figures. The larger Tug (VALIANT) is 48" and is 1/32nd scale. But using 1/35th scale crew. As for your Gipsy yacht. I'd love a copy of your plans, could it be possible to copy and email. If yes I'll pm you my email address, it's quite possible I have a suitable part built hull that was donated to me at a show last year. Cheers Colin.👍

displaying at vintage and steam rallies. by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Back to your display, Colin, very impressive array in your Harbour. I see why you were interested in where the Gypsy sailboat came from. You get the plans off the computer or I can get you one.

Tempory computer by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Colin, an IPad works well too. Nicely done tugs! What size is the little one? Are there figures on those too? Possibly some H.O. Scale figures might work or another train scale. I used 1/72 figures on my tug.

Tempory computer by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Your Tugs look very nice! Glad to see you are able to upload pictures of them.