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>> Home > Tags > cooling

cooling
cooling
What transmitter by Nobby-Clark Petty Officer   Posted: 7 days ago
Guys I’m in the market for a new transmitter and after advice. The first boat had a two channel, my new build will have independent motor control, I need some advise please on transmitter/ receiver, for two motors, one rudder, maybe spare etc for sound or cooling fan for motors etc. Any help out there , it needs to be reliable but pensioner affordable if the two go together. Regards Nobby

Spektrum, new, useless... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
Hi Doug, sorry, missed this one. I have the Taycol Supermarine for the CT. I have a Simprop 18 Amp Brushed ESC and a couple of big uns with cooling which I will photograph and attach to another post. I have just received the new Rx. It's a Storm S603, but it has plugoles that I am not familiar with. At one end it says PPM, then Batt, Aux, Gear,Rudd,Elev,Aile and Thro, with the bind socket sideways under the throttle end and something else with a wee gold pad next to the bind plug socket. But at the other end of the case there is a port marked STAT. So PPM and Stat are new to me. I had a gander on Youtube, but no explanation. Naturally being Chinese there are no instructions. Anything I should bear in mind before I try binding it to the DX5e? Cheers, Martin

Spektrum, new, useless... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
Hi Martin, what make an' model are the ESCs? Don't think you'll need the cooling with your Taycols 😉 Which one do you intend to use in the CT by the way? Cheers, Doug 😎 PS: I see that the Management (aka 'er indoors!) is still keeping at least one thumbscrew on 😁 (Wish I could stick a highly appropriate Smiley in here 🤔) Just sanded my fingerprints off on the PTB. Right time for a bank job? 😁

Brushless motor selection by canabus Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi robhenry Your motor would be only running at about 9500rpm 0n 9.6 volts. The closest brushless motor would be a Hobbyking Turnigy L5055C-700kv on 4S Lipo batteries (10360 rpm), these are 50mm diameter, 6mm shaft. Note you require a separate ESC for each motor and a Y connector to link them to your throttle channel. Personally I would use the Hobbyking car 100A ESC's (HK-100A). Also both the motors and ESCs require no water cooling. Canabus

Sea Scout 'Jessica' Sea Trial - at last! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Thanks Donnie, hope my results help others who are treading similar paths 😉 Forgot to mention: after each run I 'tested' the motor temp with my fingertips - very slightly warm to the touch but nothing to get excited about so no need for cooling arrangements 😊

NAXOS - Fishing Boat by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Depending on what voltage you intend using governs what gearing you should use commensurate with size and weight of model and prop size , IE small boat and prop ,low voltage direct drive would do. As you go bigger then consider gearing.Bear in mind the torque produced by the drill. You could build a large boat with a fine turn of speed using that motor. The thing is there are so many possible variables you could experiment till the cows come home. The thing is how big a boat can you handle without putting your back out. LOL. If you remove the existing gear and replace it with one secured by grub screws and a "GearBox" with easily changed cogs you can achieve something suitable. You shouldn't need cooling .Remember the drill had none and your motor will have free space round it in the hull. If you decide you do want cooling annealed copper tubing can be wound round the can and one of the plastic tubes used to couple this to the scoop and the outlet. One way of making a scoop is a length of tubing with a slot cut in it and a cap soldered (or glued depending on material) on the end when in place under the hull the cutout will face forward. Preferably in the prop wash.Or buy a ready made scoop from a model shop. Much simpler as the mounting method will be incorporated in it already. Here is a page of suitable shops.--https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=model+boat+shops&npsic=0&r... Good luck. P.S. Join a club. Youll get loads of help from the other members.👍👍

NAXOS - Fishing Boat by hecrowell Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
After a time away due to illness and other family issues, I am back to the build of the NAXOS. By accident, I think that I have obtained a suitable power plant for her - it is the motor out of a cordless drill which I can no longer get a battery pack for. Aparently, it runs on 6V to 60V. Wondering if it will require water coolong or not. If so, how does one arrange a "water scoop" for the cooling tube and where is the discharge sent to? Maybe a port in the transom..... As you can see, it has a pinion gear on the shaft and I don't know if I should leave it on and incorporate a prop speed reduction gear or remove it (with heat) and go "direct drive" coupling to the prop shaft. I have a plan for the ESC with BEC and as I love building electronic devices likely will go with "home brew". I am a boat building novice so constructive input appreciated. Have located a source for wood construction material, so hopefully will have something to show next time.

It's a sad day!. by Novagsi0 Captain   Posted: 2 months ago
If you see on my list above after the engine size if a D was noted its diesel and all these engines were for boat use and water cooled. However my father did make any parts needed so conversion to water cooling jacket on an engine was no problem if needed. Stephen.

It's a sad day!. by BOATSHED Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I used to use Blackheath pond South London but last time I went there with a boat I had just come off the pond after clipping the pond side and bending my prop shaft,The local park ranger pulled up in a van after someone making a complaint. The boat isn't noisy as the cooling also runs out of the exhaust. He told me I was very lucky as if he had actually seen it running on the pond it was an £80.00 fine. He saw me lifting it off the water but engine wasn't running. I don't understand it as some of the boats I have seen running with brushless scream more than my 26cc PT109. I do have a Proboat Miss Geico she isn't too bad on noise, I also have a Graupner Rhode Island with a brushless outboard but she is still untried on water up to now.

H.M.S. BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
From the brief pool test, had decided that the motors could be susceptible to overheating, so connected up the water jacket cooling system and powered it with a small pump. Did not leave enough space to fit a scoop behind a propeller anyway, but prefer the positive action of a pump though. From feeling the ESCs, was also concerned they could overheat within a confined space such as the hull. Mounted a couple of small fans in a bridge structure above the ESCs, along with the ESC switches. Not sure either of these cooling modifications are really required, but erred on the side of caution. Final weight of the hull, with all electrics (apart from battery) comes to 5.05 lbs. Looks like will not achieve the target weight of 6 lbs, but am hopeful will be able to get close to it.. Built the deck up with gun mount bases and a removable decking over the engine area. This limits access to the internals; so will not fit it permanently until the test program is complete and all modifications incorporated. Have now reached a point where any further work will be to start finishing the model, unless drivetrain modifications are required. Have thus decided to leave it until after the first open water test date. This will be in late May as am away until then.

RAF Fireboat (vintage) Aero by CB90 Captain   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 9/10] 34"/2500g RAF Fireboat (vintage) Aero Capable of 12mph and a runtime of 40mins Single Propellor (2 Blade X Type 45mm) Direct Drive to a Bullet 30 (2 Blade X Type) Powered by LiPoly (11.1v) 5Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through 24v 15A Electronize (15Amps) ESC - Comments: Ebay job £50 Old Vintage Aero kit 34in Fire boat needing a lot of attention, with delaminating plywood, old glue, old glow-plug engine mounts with electric conversion, and after removing a metal shield I discover an vintage (1970,s Ripmax Bullet 30 Motor the dogs bollocks of electric racing of its time capable of running 24v at 15A. 300W for a brushed motor. Started by revamp rear pit by lowering servo and rudder and building sub deck, storage lockers, tow hook and ladders. Remount the motor with an aluminium mount with custom screw positions. Block windows with 1mm ply. Foam front half of hull to make unsinkable. Make centre decking area. Repair and build up on cabin roofs and walls to centre deck. Rewire add ESC and servo. Remove broken and unusable fittings such as large vents, some missing unable to match again. Problems with old gloss paint crazing the modern spay paints. Build some fittings eg Water cannons, life belts, Build new battery trays, Painting the boat now in progress as of 20/04/2018 Boat has be roughly painted but is not finished, as fittings are now required, added a RC system an gave it a test run. the performance was adequate on 14.4v and great on 17.2v see latter pictures on the pond. the motor did get hot after about half hour of use. the motor is rated at 24v but I think a smaller prop will be required for that voltage. Excellent performance from a brushed motor. Added some stickers and I have now added a 12v fan and ventilation between cabins as the motor required some cooling and was in a sealed compartment.

H.M.S. BRAVE BORDERER by reilly4 Captain   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Rowen, I have had water cooling on all my patrol boats running at 12Volts, whether brushed or now brushless. For the brushed motors I have used aluminium tube coils with water pickups between the propellers and rudders. I did try water jackets a couple of times but found too much friction loss and therefore lack of flow. For the newer brushless outrunners I use a brass tube soldered to a brass plate across the front of the motor fitted between it and motor mounting bracket. I agree with Doug with regards to the disconnection of the red wires on the ESC's. This is now common practice, especially if you have an external receiver battery.

H.M.S. BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Thanks all for the responses. Donnieboy - have thought out the plumbing, which is simplified by using a cooling pump. See future episodes! Doug - appreciate the concern regarding the red ESC wires. Have been trying to understand the rationale behind that theory. If all ESCs share a common input voltage, i.e. from one battery, what would the connection of multiple red wires do? Can understand if there were several unique power sources, but that is not the case here. Perhaps with your electronics background you can explain. Colmar - Used the angle on the scale drawing. If it were good enough for Vosper, should be good enough for me! Think it close to 7 degrees anyway. Think short shafts with oilers should help. Have heard of bushings running dry and seizing with these high speed motors. The initial props are scale versions of the originals. Rather suspect they will not prove to be ideal. Have purchased some 2 blade racing style props for a future test. They have a much coarser pitch and are designed for high speed motors. Intend to use plastic props initially as they are cheap enough to experiment with. Perhaps others have a comments on the cavitation question?. Incidentally, this is my first high speed boat too, but there is much of information on both this web site and Model Boat Mayhem for guidance. Posting questions always generates useful information. Look widely though at all types of fast models, MTBs, RAF launches, E Boats etc. - it has all been done before!

H.M.S. BRAVE BORDERER by Donnieboy Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Nice installation of the electrics.Easy access.It might be better to plan the water cooling right now just in case something gets in the way.

H.M.S. BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Once the rudder, propeller and shafts were installed, the position of the motors could be established. A light aluminium bracket to hold all three was fabricated and bonded to the hull. Due to the high speed capability of the brushless motors, particular attention was paid to alignment. Also kept to the shortest prop. shafts that could be fitted to avoid whipping. Although the motor type might change, whatever is best will require a sound electrical installation as the current requirements for each brushless motor could reach 50 Amps. Wired each motor and ESC separately with its own dedicated fuse to give the maximum system protection. There is an extra fuse section allocated for auxiliary circuits, such as a cooling water pump and lights. Will try the original planned layout of 3 x 2835 motors with 30mm propellers and a 2S Li-Po battery first. Am hoping the reduced voltage will also make these motors more tractable. For the test program the three ESCs will be each controlled from an individual Rx channel. Once the final layout is determined, a more sophisticated and flexible control system can be installed. To minimize ballast, particularly around the stern, the battery will be housed as far into the bow as possible. After the test runs the final battery type, size and location can be established. To assess performance, hope to try both 2 and 3S Li-Po batteries. Planning to reduce heat build up by fitting cooling water jackets to the motors, these are easiest to instal at this stage so the wiring or mounts are not disturbed in the future. Have not decided the layout for the water circuit yet, but this easily can be added later. All that is needed now is the ice to melt off our local lakes so tests can commence.