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>> Home > Tags > cover

cover
stern cover
cover
getting a bit slow?... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 hours ago
Sorry, I didn't realise there had been any follow up to this. (May I suggest a "View New Posts" button? Or am I missing something) I think my remarks a year ago were perfectly valid, now you remind me of them. I thought I'd been offensive or something. I see no cause for offense there. Teejay, you, too, have misunderstood my post. I was saying why I had left model railways, a hobby of a lifetime so far. THAT alone was the area of kit snobbery. Not here, or in model aircraft forums, which are nearly all kit based, yet I am a happy member of Large Scale Planes and Britmodeller. Mainly because two old friends tend to communicate with me that way. Doug, I have a 1/48th scale Mk1 Airfix Spitfire which I have turned into the First Flight in zinc chromate and polished metal, because I don't do military (liveries, at least) and have made a scratchbuilt photographer and his plate camera for the set-piece. It all sits on a bit of died lint grass. Then I have a 1/48th scale Airfix English Electric Lightning as it's a superb kit and impressive in that scale. I got it cheap off ebay. I also bought an Italian resin kit of a Houchin start-up compressor to go with it, which was amazing value and have made a tarmac set-piece ready for displaying that lot on. It was purely to save time getting something I just fancied doing. It's the foil covering on the Lightning I fancied doing. No snobbery there and when others buy loads of aftermarket stuff to add to it, none there either. And they usually make it all fit themselves. They don't pay someone else to do it. If injury or health demands it, that's a very different kettle of fish, but those sort of people rarely, if ever,brag. So, once and for all, nothing I said this time had any reference to this forum or this hobby. What I said a year ago I meant, but perhaps it was a bad day. I always read what I type as my hard, dry old fingertips slip around the keyboard and I wouldn't understand my own typing if I didn't check it. Doug has indeed helped others and me too. But so, I think, have I. Indeed that has always been my intention after a lifetime in modelmaking. Cheers, Martin

It's a sad day!. by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 hours ago
Considering you can't run a pressurised boiler without a Vulcan steam certificate, there is no justification for banning steam, like New Brighton has. Mind you, when I saw what a silly little puddle they'd been left after the new developments on that town's seafront (hotel and retail) I wondered why they bothered turning up at all, but on 2 occasions I watched while I was staying there to visit a friend with my wife, there were two old boys with tugs and one of those had forgotten his batteries! Otherwise a Dad with a small boy and his off the shelf speedboat and even that was scowled at by the old farts. If a boat has a Mamod type of boiler it's not even considered a pressure vessel as its capacity is too low as is its "pressure", so you're covered all round. No need to ban anything as usual. Many parks have live steam railways and if they went bang they'd get their windows blown out in the town hall! Martin

Vanity, Victorian Cutter by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
R/C gear going in on a 2 piece plank, so it'll fit through the hatches. Some deck planks going on, king plank too. Coamings to help water proof from splash. These are Foamex, completely waterproof stuff. The hatches and houses will be fitted with magnets eventually. The planking is NOT a la yacht. For some reason Dan Hatcher laid deck planks like workboats and motor boats, parallel to the King plank, not the covering boards. Believe me when you've lived on one of these and put every pot you have under the deck leaks when it rains, you know the pattern of the laid deck! Rear deck half just rested on as the R/C gear is yet to be finished. Waiting for some more allly tube to guide the steering cables and braided line for the sheet control. Steering servo coming this afternoon. Martin

1940 Chris Craft by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
My wife and I were in Gig Harbour, Washington State today where we were invited onboard by the owners of this beautiful boat. They told us, it is on the water most of the year in Seattle. The boat is varnished every two years. It requires continual care as the salt water is corrosive. Also seen was a nifty outboard; even the outboard motor cover is made of wood. A group of friends were seen enjoying a dockside luncheon. They said “Please take our picture” Very nice inboard Runabout.

Emma C. Berry Conversion by carpemoment Petty Officer   Posted: 3 days ago
Decided to sail her maiden voyage in a more controlled environment -- our condo pool. Rudder worked fine. Lines for sails got fouled up in the winch quickly. Wind was very light. A lot of sideways movement so I will have to increase the keel. I expected that but was hoping that it would be okay for pleasure cruising but there is clearly not enough underwater resistance to gain much control. With the lines fouled, a sudden 30 foot wave took her over and she turtled. BUT she didn't sink and she was a beauty while it lasted. Funny thing is my maiden cruise in my 14' Cyclone ended with capsizing for a similar reason. Only difference is it had been awhile since I had sailed and I forgot to let off the throttle when the wind picked up and a 100' wave took me over. Recovery with my Emma was much less challenging than with my Cyclone. 😀😉⛵️

Vanity, Victorian Cutter by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
Hi all, a 1/16th scale model of the boat I used to live on at Burnham-on-Crouch. 1/8th" Cuban (yes really!) mahogany from 1920s chairs made by my cabinet maker Grandfather. Covered in J cloth and epoxy. J-cloth is very compliant, but yet very strong when soaked in epoxy (WEST System). Lightweight fillered for the bits where the saw wasn't as accurate ripping the strips as it might have been. Black enamel primer.

Fibreglass the hull by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
I purchased as recommended by Robbob the fibreglass package which consisted of 750g of epoxy resin and 250g of hardener, I also went for the 90min cure as this is the first time I have ever done a boat hull, I’ve done plenty of stranded fibre cowlings/air intakes etc. where you lay a gel coat first then stranded matting which is so different to laying a fine matt on its own. I also ordered some mixing sticks and throw away brushes. First I cut the matting to the slightly oversize for one of the side skins, then loosely taped the matt to the bottom skin and checked the coverage - and checked again then fold over to the opposite side, this then leaves the surface clear to apply the resin. Mixing the resin should be done accurately, so borrow the kitchen scales and here we go. I wasn’t sure how much to mix for a side skin but 25g of resin and 7.5g of hardener looks about right. So mix well and then brush onto the side skin, then I gently lifted over the matting and laid it on the skin and gently brushed the matting down, the matting is almost sucked onto the resin so minimal brushing is required to ensure a smooth surface A previous blog said that “Less is More” how true this is, the temptation to spread the remainder of the resin on to the already adhered matt is something to be avoided, however learn by my mistake as I did just that (only in a small area on one skin) leaving rather a lot of sanding later after the resin had fully cured as it leaves a rather lumpy surface. So onward and upwards the following three surfaces were relatively easy with only minor difficulty keeping the matting in close to the 90 degree angle between the keel and skin and I had to keep going back to it pressing it in with a steel rule until the resin started to go off but minimal resin left a surface that was flat and the weave of the glass matt can be clearly seen and felt but minimal sanding is required if at all. Then a further 2 coats of resin with sanding in between will leave a smooth surface ready for final preparation of painting. The final picture is of the roof that in a previous page I said to add strength the roof would need a coat of glass to reinforce the unsupported edges – To be continued

Re: Sharpie by Nerys by Nerys Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 12 days ago
Hi Doug, The tiller and linkage to the servo are under the after raised deck, as are the sail servo, receiver etc. The whole raised deck or hatch cover lifts off for easy access. Cheers, Nerys

Sea Commander restoration tips by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
Hi Laurence, check out the Build Blogs on this site. There are many covering various 'Seas', including my Sea Scout renovation with lots of tips re painting and varnishing. https://model-boats.com/builds/view/28209 Last pic shows the 'before' state after 20 odd years in the cellar! Have fun, cheers Doug 😎

Our boating water by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
I'll cover your swans and raise you geese, ducks and moorhens! 😁 Ostpark Lake and Biergarten, Munich 😉

Final fitting of cabin roof skins by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
Now that the internal detail of the cabin has been finalised and fixing points made for each of the panels and floor pieces (all parts of the cabin detail are to be removable) I can now finally fit the cabin roof skins. Since the leading edge has an overhang which because of the lifting design hasn’t the same framework support I have decided to reinforce the joint with stainless steel pins.to ensure a perfect fit, I made a tiny jig out of brass angle that ensured all the holes in each piece lined up. I then placed pieces of silicon sheet on the parts I really didn’t want the skins to stick to the cabin framework. Fist all the pieces were position and pinned to ensure a good fit, they were then removed adhesive applied and the skins finally placed and pinned, most of the pins will be removed when it’s dry. The centre panel has an opening for the hatch so this was put in prior to fixing. After a day’s drying it’s time to see if the whole thing works as envisaged, thankfully it does. The roof will now have to be dismantled so further work can be carried out it, will also get a covering of glass matting to add overall strength.

Rudders and propeller by teejay Lieutenant   Posted: 22 days ago
Hi all for the second blog report on the schenllboot I am going to go over the rudder an propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat , these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts .which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel)and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum power mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The forth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I have to ask for some help could any one advise me on the length of propeller shafts , I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft but port and starboard will have to be longer . and I also need advice on selecting the motors , I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.

RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch by ronrees Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 25 days ago
[Score: 10/10] 16"/500g RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch Capable of 15mph and a runtime of 90mins Single Propellor (2 Blade X Type 25mm) Direct Drive to a Turnigy 2211 x 1400kv (2 Blade X Type) Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) 2Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through HK 10 Car For/Rev. (5Amps) ESC - Comments: This is another article for MB magazine. The model plan had to fit across 2 pages (A3) Hence its length. This one is built using the old Keil Kraft Eezibilt methods of the late 1950's. Made using mainly Balsa wood and covered in nylon tights and dope. It is fully detailed mainly using odds and ends . The plexiglass gun turrets are made using 21mm Carp fishing 'Ball' floats. Masters in plastic were fitted to the model after mouldings were made for the Oerlikon 20mm and all the Lewis guns as well as shrapnel padding and most fittings. 2 sheets of highly detailed plans will be free in the Winter Special hopefully with a full photo and build write up. It goes like a rocket. Great little model and all for under £25.00!. (Inc ESC, Motor and battery!)

Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
Tug man, as the splicing is taped over. Sized, I can save you a lot of time. Super glue the join, then cover with black heat shrink, Nylon cord will melt. But you should be ok. PS. Twist the joint then super glue. Wear latex gloves. Keep up the very good job. Proper job, they say down here.

Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
Way to go man!!! At the risk of becoming monotonous 🤓 Brilliant woodwork and fittings 👍 Did you make the pulleys yourself? Looks like stainless, if so Hat Off Sir 👍👍 PLEASE DON'T PAINT THAT LOVELY CLINKER BOAT!!😲 It would look Soooo good varnished to your usual standard, and I'm pretty sure from the photos of the original that only the canvas cover was blue. Surely the boat itself was varnished. More power to your rigging, Cheers Doug 😎