Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
February 2019: 7 people
January 2019: 16 people
December 2018: 6 people
November 2018: 11 people
October 2018: 9 people
September 2018: 13 people
August 2018: 5 people
July 2018: 8 people
June 2018: 8 people
May 2018: 7 people
April 2018: 10 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (20)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > crew

crew
crew
Painting by MouldBuilder Admiral   Posted: 19 hours ago
I must admit that the painting process is not my favourite. It takes so long and time is always at a premium due to work commitments. I rush it a bit so that the build can continue. I fitted all of the windows into the deck structure and covered them with the low tack film. I then primed, two coats, painted, two coats followed by two coats of lacquer. I am quite pleased with the results even though it is not perfect. I decided not to fit the deck until all of the electronics, including the ESC, battery and receiver had been installed. This is because one of the big problems with this model is the lack of room to work in once the deck is in place. Another problem I encountered was the fitting of the tiller cranks onto the rudders. If the instructions are followed, it is almost impossible the adjust or remove them once the deck has been fitted. I solved the problem by reversing the cranks and bending the connecting wire to miss a bulkhead support. The screws can now be reached from the deck opening. I have now completed the majority of the painting and have started to assemble the remaining parts. Currently I am doing the wiring of the lighting and making a couple of circuit boards. There are a lot of wires involved so to reduce the amount I have decided to us e a common negative. (Cannot remember what this is called right now). There are still a lot of wires and they are mostly coming out from the cabin structure. I have decided to introduce some nine pin connectors to make cabin removal a lot easier. This is quite a big job and will take a little while. I really enjoy this bit. The results add that little bit of extra satisfaction when it all works as it should.🤓 The top search light assembly came as a bit of a surprise. It is manufactured from nickel silver plate and requires soldering together. Even though I am a precision engineer, I have not soldered a box since I was at school. Once I stopped burning my fingers with the heat, I quite enjoyed the assembly even though it would have been useful to have an extra hand and took the best part of today to complete.😤 I can honestly say that I have enjoyed most of this build and even though earlier on I was thinking to avoid Aero-naut models in the future, I have changed my mind. They are very cleverly designed. I expect to complete this model some time in March. That would be the first for me to complete in recent times even though I have two others on the go and one new one in its box ready for a Summer start.😊

Trying to trace a boat by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
I've got one in the style of a "Cigarette" racer Twin screw detachable cabin for access . The legend on Tx is super at top and RC Speed Ability across bottom It's white with red and blue stripes. Nimh cells for everything. 40 ,3 Meg it I recall.👍 This may help although full scale. https://www.google.com/search?q=cigarette+racing+boats+for+s... I hope you have the time to look through All of them. Find one you like then see if someone does a kit /plan whatever. Good hunting.😁 PS Just thought ! have a look at Bang Good and Gear Best sites under speedboats etc.🤓

tvr steam engine by GaryLC Lieutenant   Posted: 6 days ago
Hi Rick, and I am hoping this helps, the inlet and exhaust manifolds on the engine have no fittings included for you to screw onto, the connecting end is just a plain 1/8" brass pipe, so you need to silver-solder your fitting to suit. I have included a photo which hopefully will help. you are going to need some elbows (90* bends) and maybe a Tee piece or two, globe valves and the pipe fittings to put it all together, plus a condenser to collect and separate the exhaust waste steam. My condenser is simply a piece of 2" brass pipe, I can do you some piping diagrams for you if this helps, or send me a plan of how you are going to connect it all together. The end result will be worth it I promise. Regards, Gary. Hang on in there I have every confidence.

Paddle Tug Iona- paddle boxes & superstructure by Harvey Kitten Lieutenant   Posted: 8 days ago
Building the paddle boxes was remarkably easy, once the 1mm ply had been steamed for bending. I decided to build the boxes first and make sure the paddles fitted inside later, the idea being that all this would come apart for maintenance should it be necessary. (it usually is!). There are few models to be found on the internet to use as reference and hardly any images of the original tug. And to confuse matters, PS Iona also existed as a passenger ship, as well as tug, and looked a bit different. The superstructure is really simple and quick to build, with some more planking! Am liking planking small areas now. The funnels came from some scrap plastic tubing in the garage... just the right diameter too, a lucky find. These will screwed in place from below once I have the other funnel parts made. I plan to run the tug on batteries rather than steam, as I am a relative novice to model boat building. The whole deck will be fitted with 1mm ply as a base before... more planking! Before all this is glued in place, I thought it best to water test the ship first and see how much ballast I am likely to need.

RC steam lever by GaryLC Lieutenant   Posted: 9 days ago
Hi Rick, and there is no news like good news, I promise you will not regret buying the engine, a wonderful piece of kit and runs like a Swiss watch. Its crowning glory is the fact it runs on less than 30 PSI an easy boiler pressure to maintain. I am sure you will enjoy building the engine and sorting out the slide valve timing, and you will have a good understanding of exactly how it works. Hoping the old eyes are still sharp, for all those tiny screws. Regards, Gary. PS. The ideal boiler size is 3 1/2" dia. 6" length, will give you near enough 30 mins. run time.

Building the Cabin. Part 1 by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
The superstructure of the launch is very simple, and from a practical point it was designed to give the crew a large field of view across the river and fast access in and out to deal with emergency situations. Consequently the construction is quite basic and would be quite straightforward if permanently fixed to the boat but this cabin needs to be removable to give access to the battery location and motor. Because of this the cabin needs to be a strong and rigid structure of its own and yet fit invisibly to the rest of the model, it’s also only a three sided structure because of the open access at the rear and that alone will be a point of weakness to the structure. I started by glueing the internal bracing strips to the insides of the deck sides as described in the instruction sheet and some strips that form the base for the sides that sit on the deck, these also needs to be sanded to an angle to sit flush on the deck and also create a vertical face that some further strips are fixed to which meet the inside walls of the deck well. Although all the parts for the cabin are accurately laser cut I chose to do a dry ‘test fit’ using pins and elastic bands to hold the side panels and roof braces together. This 'dry fit' was neccessary because I had previously decided to fit false obeche panels over the balsa sides and floor of the well to get a better surface to finish in the way I intend, balsa does not have any pleasing grain and does not look good even when stained, so I pinned all these panels in place to account for their addition to the internal dimensions of the well deck. When I was happy that the geometry of the side panels and front window panels was correct I glued all the roof braces in place and added some reinforcing fillets to make it more rigid, temporary braces were glued across the front and rear of the assembly to keep the whole thing rigid and square during further assembly. The pins and rubber bands were used to pull in the side panels while the aliphatic glue set. All of this was done with the cabin on the boat so that the correct ‘dry’ fit converted to a permanent fit. Part 2 will continue with the addition of the front window panels and roof.

vice suitable for Dremel Workstation by octman Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
Good morning folks, I have a Dremel Workstation, or drill stand as I call it, and would like to get a small machine vice (is that the correct name?) to go with it. I have seen a few smallish ones but they are usually too big to bolt to the base. Can anyone out there offer any workable suggestions please? Also, is the material the vice is made from of make any relevance at this small size, i.e. is cast aluminium any good? ( I had a screw-on table top vice made of cast aluminium which snapped in half the first time I used it.) I feel the need for this vice as I am about to drill a 1mm hole in a model yacht's mast to locate the boom vang and with my shaky hands it could end up being big enough to pass the boom through without some sort of support!! Chris

Danish Steam. by GaryLC Lieutenant   Posted: 16 days ago
Another youtube offering, and also Danish as per the last video. A very neat steam engine installation of a twin cylinder slide valve, in an open hardwood boat. The three figures on board are to a very high standard and dressed very much the same as the last video. It would seem besides bacon, Denmark is the place to find one's authentic boat crew.

Aeronaut Pilot Boat by MouldBuilder Admiral   Posted: 19 days ago
Hi Ron. I have just fitted the rudders and controls last weekend. I have built almost the complete model but held off from fitting the deck until I had time to consider this problem. The best I could come up with was to reverse the control arms so that their screws fixing them to the rudders were accessible from the front after the deck had been fitted. Doing the linkages this way means that you have to bend the control arms to miss the strength rib in front of the rear skin and also you might have to reverse the servo travel direction on the Tx. I had to do this.😉 I have included a picture to show what I have done. It does not solve all of the problems but makes adjustment possible. I have also included a picture of the dual speed controller. I know you have solved this problem but I have tested this unit and it works very well. I hope this helps in some way. Peter.😊

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Winter seems to encourage modeling, have spent many hours in hibernation working on the deck and superstructure details. A supplier offers a full set of Perkasa fittings, most of which would work on the Brave B. At one point considered buying a set. They are made in both resin and cast metal. Eventually parsimony prevailed, so only purchased a small number of hatch covers and other intricate shapes that would be difficult to make well. The items duly arrived and the quality is good. Was surprised by the weight though, so am pleased had embarked on making the other items from the usual materials. There should be an overall weight saving, along with a reduction in my surplus styrene and wood stock. One of the design tenants of the Brave class was flexibility. The vessel could operate as a MTB, MGB or Raider, or with a mixture of these capabilities. The weapon mountings were designed to allow armaments to be installed and moved around to suite the requirements of the role. Have reviewed many Brave class photographs trying to establish a “standard” armament configuration, to reproduce. Not only does the configuration define the weapons installed, it also establishes the ammunition and flare storage cabinet arrangements. Eventually decided upon the 2 x 40mm Bofors gun arrangement with 2 x 21” torpedoes and 4 x extended range fuel tanks. The model is now essentially complete. No doubt as I keep examining it will add further small details and refinements. Only disappointment so far is that it does not achieve the original weight target of 6 lbs, it is 9.5 lbs. The 6 lbs may possibly have achievable using one screw and motor etc., but once three are installed, not likely. The real test is when finally back on the water. Will close this blog then with a concluding report.

fuse holder by Escrich Seaman   Posted: 24 days ago
I’m using this kind of car fuse holder, on 15 Amps size, the difference is that mi fuse holder it’s mounted using two M3 or 1/8” screws, and have a cover too, very nice from AliExpress

Fan Surround by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Joe I admire your persistence with this and it seems to have paid off. Each of your attempts has improved well done. I have a question - 1 - Is there a chance that the rubber stopper being so close to the heating element could be damaged or melt the rubber? Have you considered a metal screw top, you can sometimes get a metal can with a screw cap, glue tins come to mind you could cut the end off and use the screw cap and just solder the end up. 2 - have you considered adjustable fan speed /element voltage to vary the amount of smoke according to engine speed. 3 - finally what about a smaller version, can you get smaller fans? just a thought, keep up the good work Michael

Tin Work by Joe727 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
The tin can that I used is from a small tomato paste sauce from the market. Use whatever tin that you would like or can find. Look at my sketch to see how it needs to function and adjust your design to what enclosure is available to you. Lots of ways to do it, just make sure you have these points covered: 1. Method of attaching a fan to push air into the unit. 2. Place for output stack / tube. 3. Method of mounting a wick with heating element attached that can sit above the fluid level. See sketch in previous post. First photo, I cut three holes, each sized to fit the brass tubes and fan opening. This tin is thin and easy to poke holes in. I start by marking the opening locations with a marker, them I use a small sharp awl or pin to stare a hole. With hand tools ( power drill will easy shred the can, be careful) I enlarge the holes with small hand drills or reamer, found files, etc, I rotate the tools slowly in the opening and gradually enlarge it to size needed. Then I cut brass tubing to length with a small hand held hobby razor saw. Our in place, apply flux and solder. Once heated properly the solder flows easily.for the larger fan opening, I then used a dremel tool with sanding drum to make a nice round opening. The fan has corner openings for screw mount. Secure with some tiny sheet metal screws. Next I will build an enclosure around the fabpn edge to fit the round can. Might just use silicone caulk. Note, I did not open the can with a can opener, left the ends in place and poured the content out thru the holes made, Yes, it's a bit messy and wasted the sauce, but it's a cheap way to get an tin enclosure. More to come. Please give me feedback, am I being clear enough? Thanks, Cheers, Joe

Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
Thanks Haig👍 I just hope Andy is still around. Maybe a variant of my four screw setup for my HMS Belfast could help him. I'm going to upgrade it with differential ESC control for the two outer motors to assist the steering, the 'beast' (125cm), only has one rudder. I also use SLAs (and brushed motors) in such large displacement hulls, but for planing hulls these days the 'norm' must surely be brushless and LiPo (or at least HiPower NiMh😉). G'night from frozen Munich 😡 Cheers, Doug 😎

Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
Hi John, You seem to have missed the point entirely, as you also did with your first post on this thread, in which instead of trying to help Andy and answer his question you attempt to dissuade him from his goal. Unfortunately I missed Andy's question back in March as I was embroiled with family matters. BUT, if he hasn't in the meantime been 'scared off' by the lack of constructive response I will do my best to help, having several times been down the road of multiple screws, as have many other better constructors than me on this site. Nearly all my ships have two, three or even four screws. Only the Sea Scout and ancient Billing Boats fish cutter (a restoration and conversion from static to RC project) have single screws - as per originals. About a year ago I acquired a model of a US Elco PTB fitted with two shafts. I am restoring it, rebuilding as Kennedy's PT109, and will fit the third shaft to complete it to scale as per original. Why? Because that's what scale modelling is about and because it's a challenge - pushing limits. Far be it from me to decry or put down anyone (as you now seem to be trying with me). We all have the enthusiasm (or we wouldn't be here) and do the best we can with the skills nature gave us and what the budget and state of health allows. I have often been astounded and appropriately applauded, and supported where I can, what fellow members have achieved with very limited resources and under very different circumstances from those we in the so called 'Western World' enjoy. That guy in Bangladesh blows my mind with what he manages in the back of beyond! Look for his post about his March '71 boats. WHEN I pitch in here I try to do so with constructive assistance, drawn from my own modelling experience and a lifetime spent working with navies and shipyards, to help a guy achieve his aims and dreams. NOT to immediately deflate him by saying 'Why do that? I did mine this way, it's not what you want but it works for me'. So far the Likes, PMs and mail feedback, request for assisitance I have tell me I'm doing something right. If I do boob (we're all human) I'm prepared to admit it and make amends / corrections. I have no idea what this 'Hooben' is that you yatter on about BUT - if "every little detail (is) reproduced with superb accuracy" why then ruin the overall effect by not continuing this attention to detail on the underwater ship and fitting shafts and screws appropriately? Whatever you do have fun with it, but don't dissuade others from pursuing their dreams. True there are "many roads to travel before one reaches there (!sic) destination" BUT as Confucius said "Every journey begins with the first step." If at the first step someone says 'Your destination is the wrong one' instead of offering a roadmap ..... ! Regards, Doug 😎 BTW: still waiting for the pics / videos of your 'Hooben' (?) and the Perkasa.