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>> Home > Tags > deck

deck
deck
What is this material? by Ron Admiral   Posted: 14 hours ago
My friend bought a damaged Marblehead sailboat. He is not sailing it in competition, only as a fun R/C sailboat. He wants me to put a thin birch ply deck on it and make the repairs needed on the rudder post area. Does anyone recognize the material used for the deck? See the golden brown coloured photos. The boat originally had an iron shrink material used on aircraft models. After I know the material, then I can determine the adhesive to use for attaching the birch ply deck. Thanks!

What is this boat ????? by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
Thanks Canabus. Very similar deck arrangement but different hull design. Anchor models What's under the central hatch?

Getting the ballast correct by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
The plan seems to indicate weight in the keel, which is where you will need it. I suggest you put the model in your bath add the steel and see how the model floats. All the keel and an inch or so of the hull should be submerged with the weight battery and servos resting in the hull. Add or remove weight to get about right. I would cut a slot in the keel to add the weight as low as possible. The plan seems to suggest this. Seal temporarily and recheck for correct waterline. You could use cling film to seal whilst checking. When happy make good the keel and fit the servos etc and check again before fixing the deck.

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 days ago
Before the funnel could be installed wanted to fit a working radar scanner, navigation lights and the batteries. Decided to use sub C NIMH batteries in plastic holders, they should have the target endurance and provide some ballast. Fitted two sets of 4 cells, one at the forward end of the superstructure and the other at the rear, both at keel level. These were inserted into wooden battery trays to hold them in place. A dry test run showed a full speed motor run time well exceeding the hour target, so will try on water. Also took the opportunity to fit the Rx and then adjust the rudder before finishing off the wiring. Both the navigation lights (LEDs) and the radar scanner work. The radar is driven by a servo with the potentiometer removed and a magnetic drive shaft run up through the superstructure from below the deck. The motor requires about 9 volts to run at what would seem to be something approximating to scale speed; fitted a voltage reducer to allow the lights and the radar to work on less than 6 volts. The mast lights are to be installed in a separate circuit after the masts are added. As I get more into the detail it is evident the GA drawing and the photographs of the vessel in service differ. Fortunately the component locations seem consistent, although the equipment is not. This most apparent in the hold ventilators. The GA shows the standard cowl vents, but the photographs show a mixture between an vertically squeezed oval vent (which am advised is more typically German) and ventilator columns with cylindrical caps. The column style vents with cylindrical caps were easily made from two different sizes of styrene tube with the cap tops made from styrene offcuts. The squeezed oval style vents were more difficult. Broke them down into the major parts of the cylindrical vertical tube and, from a larger tube cut a small ring and filed one end to straddle the tube once it had been squeezed oval. Glued it into place whilst restrained in a small hand vice. Once set, removed and sanded the the two to give a smooth transition, closing the rear aperture off with styrene offcuts. Then resorted to wood filler, filed down to give a smooth, oval vent.

Progress 12th January by Gdaynorm Commander   Posted: 6 days ago
Bridge structure nearing completion. Railings need some straightening and windows glazed. I assume the decks would be planked. This is one difficult unit to build! Anyone confirm that?

Rag crash tender by Boatboi Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 7 days ago
[Score: 5/10] 38" Rag crash tender Capable of 12mph and a runtime of 25mins Twin Propellors (3 Blade) Direct Drive to a 650 (3 Blade) Powered by NiCad (7.2v) Batteries Controlled Through Mtronicks ESC - Comments: Built on eBay hull scratch built top deck

TRIUMPH (CG-52301) USCG Type F MLB by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Laser cut kit from Barracuda RC Boats, N Carolina, USA. Baltic birch plywood false keel, ribs/frames, hull sheathing, deck and cabins. No formal plans; I was able to source a handful of B&W archival photos from the USCG website. Fortunately I was able to procure a motherload of archival photos and a few hard to read layout drawings from Mr. Timothy Dring, LCDR, USN (Ret.). He is co-author of "American Coastal Rescue Craft", which is the "bible" if you will, of such. I do sometimes thank the internet. I am certain that without his assistance, my efforts on this wouldn't have been as enjoyable. The kit was also void of fittings, which I was aware of prior to purchase, so I invested in a 3D printer. That I've used to a limited degree, due to searching for parts in the correct file format is mind-numbing! I have globally sourced fittings; USA, UK, ASIA. As a matter of fact, the searchlights I got from this Model Boat Shop were 3D printed, and I was able to fit 5mm LEDs into them. I'd like to get a couple more and put some superbright 12v LED drone lamps in them for use on my 35" towboat. Many deck fittings are handmade when possible, the cleats and fairleads are from Cornwall Boats, UK. (Very reasonable & diverse source, if you didn't already know.) I try to keep wood natural when detail allows it, as I never have enjoyed painting over natural grain. Her decks are covered with 1/16" scribed basswood sheathing from earthandtree.com, which is normally used for wainscoting dollhouse walls. All my boats that have wood decks are covered with scribed sheathing; I feel it makes 'em look "sexy". Believe it or not, the idea for wainscoting came from finding 3/16" at Hobby Lobby's dollhouse department. A couple of feet x 3.5" was about $16, so I found a less expensive source that also had more selections (earthandtree.com) The rail stanchions are 3/16" square dowels with 2 corners rounded over on the Dremel router table. Leaving their base square, I fit a square peg into a round hole with no glue to facilitate removal, and also for ease of replacing broken ones, which is inevitable. The rail is 1/16" brass rod that also is readily removable. The stern rail is stationary on the lower half, and the chain & wire stanchions are removable for towing ops. The deck coamings and knuckle are African mahogany strips, other mahogany accents came from leftovers of a prior build. I also try on all my boats, to incorporate vintage leftover scribed sheathing salvaged from my late Father's builds, so I know he's got a part in my builds. Note-the raised deck section between the aft ladder trunk and towing bit is actually a laminated deckhouse he made for the Frigate Essex. Unfortunately, he was unable to build that kit due to Alzheimer's disease in his latter years. (I blame that mostly on the hazardous fumes from the airplane "dope" & glue he used when building RC planes in the 60s & 70s.) I use polyurethane instead of resin due to COPD, 37 yrs of smoking, I quit 2.5 yrs ago. The driveline consists of: 775 Johnson DC main (3500 RPM@12V), Harbor Models 4mm x 14" shaft w/brass stuffing box, Raboesch 75mm 5-blade brass wheel (not OEM), 5mm U-joint couplers, Dimart 320A fan-cooled ESC. Handmade wooden teardrop rudder on a 3/8" sternpost, 1/4" tiller arm steered by a Halcion sail winch servo and cable system. Flysky 6 channel. The nav lights and other illumination are Lighthouse 9v LEDs, also a GoolRC Receiver controlled flashing blue Law Enforcement light. Obviously, I put the cart before the horse and completed the topsides and below deck before finishing the outer hull, but the Wx and season change dictated such. Can't wait for Spring!

oakgarth ,doug the tug and a small seaport tug by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
BRAVO ZULU! I also love the test tank, I'm investing in a 12 x 6'er next spring. My latest builds are getting too big for the tub! It's great that you get your kids involved; I feel that RC is by far the best entertainment: Helos, planes, trains, autos & especially BOATS! Heck with the video games I say! My gr'daughter loves learning to fly the helo or me chasing her around with it. My goal is to get good enough to land on the tiny flight deck of my 1:48 USCG 210' Cutter while underway, without getting wet, of course. HAVE A SAFE RC BOATING DAY!

Anteo by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
BRAVO ZULU! Your deck planking is exquisite!

egrete - Rhine pusher tug. by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
That is avery nice pusher, sir. I have built one VAC-U-BOAT 22" HIPS kit and a 35" Dumas American Beauty. Both were given my boat shop's paint scheme (ILLINIWEK MARINE). I am multitasking on a couple boats, and one is another US Western river towboat, scratchbuilt up from a salvaged Dumas Am. Beauty hull. (That hull was temp scrapped when my xacto knife got away from me trimming the deck knuckle.) My plan is to fit a telescoping pilothouse which is common to upper Mississippi, Illinois, Ohio rivers. My dilemma is the method of operating the pilothouse lift; can you advise with any info please? I thought of a linear servo w/worm gear maybe. HAVE A SAFE RC BOATING DAY

crash tender by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
BRAVO ZULU! Nice boat. That's a great tip regarding the nets. I now think I can use it for the netting on my USCG Cutter flight deck netting.

Smit Nederland Model by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
Hi all, Towards the end of the month. I'll be Ordering the Billings Smit Nederland in 1:33 Scale. The Hull is ABS Plastic while the Deck and Superstructure is made of wood! I think 1/8" ply and 1/16" Ply. My question is what glue should be used? Or would any one recommend to be used? Also what should i use to seal the wood before I paint it? Thanks. Ed

France by marky Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
Check out www.ssmaratime.com there were some deck plans etc. on here .info about French liners

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
Have moved on to the deck furniture and equipment, including the funnel. Most of it can be made from the usual assortment of scrap materials and odd and ends. Decided to start on the funnel. Planned to make up a wooden replica and wrap a thin styrene sheet around it, finally inserting styrene formers into the shell, gluing them into place. Made the replica up from scrap wood blocks and shaped it into the correct shape. The outcome looked so good was tempted to use as final as making funnels seems quite a challenge. Anyway proceeded to plan and shape thin styrene sheet around the replica, using a heat gun to overcome the memory. Once this was done, fitted shaped styrene internal formers to hold the styrene to the correct shape and glued with adhesive. After the styrene glue had dried and the excess material trimmed, now had two usable funnels - wood and styrene. The wood version is nominally smaller and fits slightly better, so decided to use it. The Teakwood was originally operated by the J I Jacobs Company, which had a buff funnel with a black cap as markings. Stumbled across a picture of the vessel when she was chartered to the British India Steam Navigation Co. Evidently BI usually painted chartered vessels in their livery. Although the picture does not show the traditional and attractive BISNCo white hull cheat line, it does show the funnel markings. These are black with two narrowly separated white bands. Rather preferred this scheme so adopted it. The picture was taken in the mid 1960s and it also shows a pristine looking ship, my worries about the model looking unsoiled seem groundless. One of the pictures shows a strip that extends back from the wheelhouse almost to the funnel - this is a support for the awnings that fit over the bridge wings.

TRENT LIFE BOAT by dragon Commander   Posted: 22 days ago
Been on hold for awhile while working on Al Khubar. Time to finish it you may have seen it at Haydock (OWLS). Running gear and electrics all working and has been sailed no leaks, Deck railings and all the white metal bits need doing along with a coat of paint to the deck. Superstructure and Fly Bridge need fittings and painting. Lots to keep me going for a while. More to come as I progress.