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>> Home > Tags > drawings

drawings
drawings
HMS Campbeltown 1941, 1/96 scale by cormorant Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 hours ago
Thanks Doug. I have amazed myself! Yes, you are quite correct - 99.8cm. I've got the drive train, including rudder installed and am just fine tuning the one piece deck. Once I have the drawings rescaled I can decide where to cut the inspection hatches, glue the deck on and start on the main construction. Looks a bit rough and ready at the moment, but I'll keep you posted. Steve

HMS Campbeltown 1941, 1/96 scale by cormorant Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 hours ago
My next project, just started, is (apart from the hull), a scratch build of HMS Campbeltown as she was in1941. I have very detailed drawings in the form of a book, Anatomy of the Ship. Unfortunately, these drawings are 1/256 scale. I have been told that if the percentage difference is calculated then the drawings can be upscaled to 1/96. I am completely incompetent at maths, but I have calculated that there needs to be an increase of 266 percent. (256 divided by 96 = 2.66). Am I anywhere close? Thank you Steve

Banckert by liamduck Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 7 days ago
[Score: 8/10] 25" Banckert Single Propellor (3 Blade 25mm) Direct Drive to a 555 (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (7.2v) 2Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through BDESC-S10E (10Amps) ESC - Comments: Built from a Billings kit I bought at Bury Metro open day. This is quite an old kit and needed careful handling due to it's age. I needed to reinforce the hull in places. Quite a reasonably easy kit to build, despite Billings (as usual) not providing any instructions, jus drawings to guide the builder.

Bustler class tug by marky Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
Bright colours ,my kind of ship.better news on the plans they realized the weight and price of postage was wrong and had another guess ,weight 16.5lbs and postage of £46 +a few pence .why dont they just weigh the drawings and carboard tube its not rocket science,could drive to Lincoln and back for cheaper than latest postage quote especialy when postage for a mamod engine from the same company is just over a tenner .Cheers Marky😊

Model hovercraft plans by Mzee Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 8 days ago
Is it a boat; is it a 'plane? Having made a very simple hovercraft back in 1954 (I think!!), I am now thinking of making another but need some assistance from anyone who has gone into this fascinating aspect, in the form of drawings and whether or not a skirt is necessary. My first model was Baby Bee powered and free running - R/C wasn't as miniature then as it is now!! Pic shows the models I left with friends when we left Kenya in 1963 - the hovercraft is on the left next to the c/l flying saucer!

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by Elsrickle Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 13 days ago
Some very interesting comments about the lights many thanks and especially to robbob for those great drawings, a big help to me and am sure many others.all information is greatly appreciated as am trying to get as near the originals as possible.

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by astromorg Seaman   Posted: 13 days ago
Interesting, valuable photos and drawings. More like that would be welcomed by many of us. As it would have been illegal not to have a stern light on vessels like these, for both normal passage and also when towing, perhaps that photo without one was during build before it was fitted? No draft marks either. The photo of 93 secured at Vospers (therefore probably before acceptance) shows the stern light while the early type fire monitors also show the date of the photo was early on. I also note one drawing shows the breach hose connectors aft of the cockpit that indicate it to be of later than original build. Similarly the cockpit roof cleats have been re-positioned athwartships rather than the original two being fore-and-aft. Considering their short operational life, it's surprising how many detail changes were made when all the available documentary evidence is studied! You'd think that after 60+ years all the answers would be known for sure by now!

Bustler class tug by marky Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
found drawings for HMS Samsonia online at Tony Green steam £ 12.50 for the plans ,quoted £1426 for delivery I know Scotland is very remote but come on

Bustler class tug by marky Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
Thinking of the next project and I'm being drawn to the Bustler class tug designed and built by Henry Robb shipbuilders where I served my time ,it looked good Sarik had a set of drawings but they are of a Canadian harbour tug rather than the ocean going salvage tug from the 1940s ,will continue to trawl the internet to see what I can find ,I know that the National Museum of Scotland has a model of HMS Bustler that I can use for reference. Cheers Marky👍

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
Hi Elsrickle, This topic has been exhaustively discussed here, with some interesting contributions from guys who served on or around these boats, and some original builders drawings. Check out this thread. https://model-boats.com/forum/boat-specific-chit-chat/42714?... Cheers, Doug 😎

Inspiration for beautiful boat builders ;-) by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
Mike, to me scratch building is just that. You start with bugger all and end up with a model boat. If you start with a kit, you're kit building and if you have to modify it to correct it you're kit-bashing. All perfectly valid, especially if you are using scratchbuilding skills to make a good job of a kit, as I had to do when a client asked me to make up an Amati Riva kit. Biggest pile of crap I ever opened the lid on. Having already built two Rivas from a pile of plywood, a plank of pear and a set of stolen Riva works drawings I was able to kit-bash the garbage into something I could deliver, but never again! I wouldn't know how to share plans, but have em all here if you can inform me how. I have Gary Griswold plans...useful, but crap. You will be correcting the build as you go along, but it's no big deal, just time consuming and a bloody nuisance! I have also a pile (roll) of drawings from The Rudder magazine, an American publication from the 20s. These are of real craft, not models, but that's irrelevant, really, when sections are given. Cheers, Martin

Not permitted by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
[Score: 5/10] 27"/500g Not permitted - Comments: 2nd Riva Aquarama Special in 1/12th scale built entirely from scratch for private customer (owner of real boat). OK I bought the left and right hand props from the Prop Shop and the glasses on the cocktail tray from a doll house supplier. Made in Venice! Each Riva took just over 700 hours to make from stolen works drawings!

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by pittsfieldpete Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Hey Doug! I’ve finally finished the long-awaited sketch! I’m sorry it took me so long but I had to work under very adverse conditions. Nearly every time I sat down to work on it one of my wife’s friends would drop in for a visit & there isn’t enough light in the closet to sketch by. Anyway, the sketch is attached. I verified that all four of the boat’s exterior lights are LEDs. The pilot house interior light is a light bulb as I’ve said before. You asked before if it’d be possible to replace the bulb with an LED. It can be done so I noted the bulb’s supply voltage on the sketch, too. Both wires running to the bulb are white (labelled “WHT” on the sketch). The Aft Deck light LEDs look crystal-clear when they’re turned off, but when they’re turned on they light up yellow! I didn’t expect that because the Port & Starboard Sidelight LEDs are red & green respectively when they’re turned off. The Search Light LED is clear when it’s off & white when it’s on. I hope the sketch is helpful. As I said in my last post I couldn’t get the voltage readings on the SMD resistor inputs, but I wrote their 3-digit numbers & my stab at their values in my last post, too. I hope the nomenclature I used on the sketch is somewhat like what you’re used to. Being a mechanical guy I never did any electrical or electronics drawings so I just took a stab at it for the sketch. If you have questions or need anything else just ask. Thanks again, Pete

54 year old Crash Tender by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I would like first to say that this is NOT a restoration. It has always been mine and followed me around all those years, been used extensively on Oyster beds on the Essex coast and Valentine's Park in Ilford, Essex...even the great Victoria Park, of which my Granddad was a founder member. It has eaten its way through lantern batteries out of number which my Dad, who was in the business could magic from thin air. There was always a nook in the boot of the Triumph Town and Country saloon and then the Austin Westminster for another new lantern battery, which the Taycol would destroy in about 20 intermittent minutes of left, centre, right, centre from the REP single channel gear. How I wish I still had that, but it was stolen. The REP, that is, the Taycol remains, restored and cleaned and like new again waiting to go back in the boat. I finally decided I should finish it. My wife bought me a set of white metal fittings by Yeoman out of IP Engineering, so I have no excuse. Not that I need one. It has suffered a bit over that half a century, losing odd panels, but they are easily remade and replaced. First, I had to clean out the insides of the detritus and loft life of decades. Vacuuming, scraping with a pointy thing and brushing with a stiff brush, followed by more vacuuming using a clever attachment that my dear wife thought might be useful and it was, being at least a dozen stiff, but small diameter tubes poking out of the end of a nozzle. It both pokes and nudges the old dirt and dust and sucks it away. After that the old thin mahogany deck planks, my friend thought to add in the late 60s were removed and saved where salvageable as I quite like them for trim on other boats. The deck was rather brutalised with a coarse rasp and any loose nails punched back in flush or slightly below. Then some way too old, but still good, epoxy (WEST) was used to slar all over the decks and most of the insides, even some of the cabin sides. That will be finished before dark today. I can hardly believe the epoxy still works, but it does, perfectly and so is pressed into use. In this warm weather it set very quickly. I did my usual trick of squeegeeing it on into the grain with an old credit card or Gummi, which is a sample block of silicon. Styrene will also do. I use some spare 2mm stuff I was given (that guy at IP Engineering again). The roofs had already been corrected the other evening and heavily cellulose sanding sealed. The forward cabin removeable roof was unwarped by having a tight fitting diagonal piece of pear pressed in under the top skin and glued. The new hatch on that roof was made and the shape of the roof and hatch runners changed slightly, as per drawings from this site. Here are pics. of the work today. The above resinning, the remade cabin panels a new wheelhouse bulkhead and the tow hook base panel, finally a new aft cockpit rear coaming which it never had but should have. Cheers, Martin

Crash Tender davit info... by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Martin. The 'Deck Anti-Slip Finish' bit is on page 4 near the top. Re: Colours. As there seem to be no colour photographs or film of the boats the question of colours for the decks, cabins and roofs is open to speculation but you are quite correct to point out that the plans do not specify white for anything other than the hull markings. The cabin roofs I believe would indeed have a textured coating as the crew were required to stand on them to operate the monitors etc. but I decided not to replicate the texture as is would just look like a bad paint job! I did carefully consider the colour options when painting my boat and decided to texture the deck and paint it in the colour specified ‘BS631 RAF Light Grey’ but to leave the cabin roofs untextured and painted white as that seems to be the consensus, and to my eye it does look 'right'. It is also a great shame, as you say, that one of the most popular RAF boats were so few in numbers and not well documented or photographed during their service life. I have a suspicion that a book of drawings and specifications does exist somewhere as I have seen a few pages that appear to have 'Ministry of Supply' indexes and page references. The 'Plans & Docs' section of this site has some useful information and some 'photos and drawings but they are of very poor quality and resolution. Wouldn't it be nice if whoever has that resource were to make it generally available, I believe it's out there somewhere. We can only hope. Robbob.