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>> Home > Tags > drill

drill
drill
Gunwhale rubbing strakes by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Gunwhale rubbing strakes As these pieces will be under stress they need to be steamed into shape prior to fitting so out with the wallpaper stripper and modified tube (1/4 BSP fitting in the bottom of an old piece of IKEA cloths rail).For the gunwhale strakes I used the same former as I used for the stringers so 20 mins in the steamer then into the jig for 2 days drying. The chine rubbing strakes will need a different jig but this time a left and right hand version as not only do they bend round but also up at the bow. I was however disappointed with the quality of the 3/16 square obeche as the grain was nearly at 45 degrees to its length – it snapped before I started to bend it, just pushing it into the jig I bought some better pieces from the local model shop. I temporally fitted the gunwhale rubbing strake slightly proud of the deck level in order to drill all the pin holes then remove and mix up some epoxy, coat the length and hook into the brass bow and start tapping in the pins along the length of the boat, repeat on the port side. Chine rubbing strakes are still in the jig!

Totnes Castle 1894 by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Change of plan, bent up tin plate angle to strengthen the sides on boiler room roof. Milling the brass would be wasteful I don't like waste. Another thing I disliked was the safety valve not being upright. So made a angle fitting, turned the male end in normal manner & parted off. Set in pillar drill at the required angle drilled down to meet the hole from other end. Started tap wile still in drill (by hand) then completed with wrench. Threaded a bar to fit & attached fitting in lathe, turned so the safety valve fitted flat.

Radio in a yacht by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Right chaps, firstly many thanks for your suggestions. I won't be doing LiPos, because the charging is too complicated for me. I can't read the instructions of my fancy charger so it remains in its box. I forgot that I can get NiMhs in sealed packs, so that'll be something I get hold of, although the shop had more out of stock than in! Secretary, I liked the look of that servo you linked me to and will be getting one. Norman, I have today picked up my Spektrum DX5e from my daughter's place where it was in store. I found it whilst looking for something else as always! I already have the Orange Rx and can now try binding it, when I have some batteries for both items. I also have 27meg gear, three different lots and WILL be using it in my classic speedboat models. I waste as little as possible! I have now settled on a continuous loop for the sail control, which doesn't need spring tension, though haven't decided a good way to attach the sheets to the loop or how to tell when the loop has gone as far as it dare before getting a bit mixed up. But I have sorted out the plank system by making one section trap a second, both of which can be removed separately. I found a gear and shaft out of an old printer which I chucked in the lathe and turned a groove in for the loop line. Then I found a use finally for that 6mm ball race I've had in my drill drawer for years! It was an interference fit on the shaft. I had some PTFE plate for another task and in some spare I made a hole that the ball race pushes into a treat, below it an identical plate supports the other end of the shaft, PTFE being very low friction. All this levels the return "pulley" with the servo drum. I only have a limited length of run for the loop line, but it should be enough. It's all I got anyway. About 10" between pulley and drum centres. If I attach the sheet part way down the boom instead of the end I should have enough movement. So, progress. My son-in-law supplied some bike gear cable for the rudder actuation as the rudder stock is at an extreme, typically cutter, angle. A hunt through the supplies (Pringles tins) gave up enough aluminium tube to guide the cable. Alas, I installed with lots of epoxy the rudder tube and it turns out to be 4.5mm bore! Gawd knows where that came from. The tube built into the back of the rudder itself is 4 mm. So that'll be some lathe work ahead. All good fun between the gardening chores. Cheers, Martin

Vanity, Victorian Cutter by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Thanks, I used to make top end model furniture for the Home Miniaturists. It's my way of finding a connection with my cabinet maker Granddad, who was a big model boat fan too, in fact he was a founder member of the Victoria Model Steamboat Club. She is 48x9x11 plus bowsprit. Height of rig is about 4 feet also. And yes the fitting on the keel is a piece of ally box section cut in half so it becomes U section, drilled through at equal spacing for the fin keel. Then the U section is screwed with brass screws and Marineflex sealer/adhesive to the keel, which is all solid hardwood. I did my sums and gave up, so once she was waterproof I put her in my son's fish pond and kept piling stuff in until she floated on her marks. Rigging won't be that heavy, but I made an allowance for it. Once it was floating right it turned out to need 14 1/2lbs. of ballast. BUT, that's inside. On the end of a 15" inch(ish) fin it will be less. I have 2 half bulbs cast by my other son in his back garden from my patterns. They will be bolted to the fin and faired in. Cheers, Martin

Sea Queen prop shaft by AndyG009 Lieutenant   Posted: 6 days ago
Thanks for the advice M Turpin (don't know any more than that), I am with you on that, I worked out that I actually needed about 500 mm length. So will thread the one end (actually less thread than the one supplied) then fit - measure - measure then cut. Sidley70 - I think I would have been tempted to remove the old shaft (the outer tube) and fit a new one. I suppose it depends on how well the original is fitted. Having removed one many years ago from a boat. My method was to have a reasonable size piece of steel drill and tap to the size of the old prop shaft, fit to shaft - this holds the piece at the end of the shaft - the basically give it a bash with a hammer - now in my case it came loose and then by swapping round and bashing from the inside, I got the shaft free enough to clamp a mole wrench on and 'wiggle' it out. Not very scientific, but it worked for me - no guarantees though. Good Luck

More running in at Bournville. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
Hi, I don't believe the motor has internal suppression! I have the full motor spec from MFA/Como drills and there is no mention of it. Would be most unusual. https://www.mfacomo style='background-color:yellow;'>drills.com/motors/motors.html

Rudders and propeller by teejay Lieutenant   Posted: 22 days ago
Hi all for the second blog report on the schenllboot I am going to go over the rudder an propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat , these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts .which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel)and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum power mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The forth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I have to ask for some help could any one advise me on the length of propeller shafts , I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft but port and starboard will have to be longer . and I also need advice on selecting the motors , I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.

H.M.S BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 29 days ago
Whilst waiting for the ice to melt, decided to make up the deck and transom flaps. The deck was made from styrene sheet, again for lightness. Made the deck beams out of square styrene sections to avoid traditional, heavy, full width bulkheads. Hoped the stiff MTBH hull would resist twisting without bulkheads. First impressions are that this is the case and when the deck is finally bonded to the hull, should be even better.. The transom flap was made from thin aluminium plate and added simulated stiffener ribs in styrene. Understand that about a 2 degree flap down inclination works best on this model. My original plan was to operate the flap using a servo with another radio channel, however once the best plane is achieved it is unlikely the flaps will need further adjustment. Unlike the real vessel, the operating weight will remain fairly constant. So, abandoned the servo idea to use adjustable bottle-screws instead. The flap angle can still be adjusted, but not in motion. These screws are much simpler, lighter and cheaper than a servo. One challenge was to make the very small hinges required for an adjustable flap. After much thinking and investigation, decided the simplest and neatest way would be to use thin, self adhesive aluminium tape, as used on forced air heating ducts. Would stick the self adhesive surface to the underside of the flap and then onto the inside face of another thin aluminium sheet, which could then be fitted to the transom using double sided tape and small screws. This seems to work so far, it also avoids drilling through holes into the transom .

Clyde puffer by marky Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
After the bad day at blackrock the fingers are like sausages and finding fiddley stuff difficult the wife offered to make some bits, so she chose the winch to start with "it can't be much harder than cross stitch "measured up and disappeared over the next few days would go to the shed to use the "drillie thing and other sawing things" her words not mine I did see the bread knife head towards the shed, see resulting photos,i think I may have created a monster ,looks like its the crochet hook or knitting pins for me now.was well impressed she did admit to raking through boxes for some bits

Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by kmbcsecretary Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
ships boat continued hi all have spent today knocking up a simple jig to hold the keel and ribs of the ships boat while the glue goes off. pic 1 & 2 shows the jig set with the keel in place. pic 3 shows the dry fit test to insure all fits square and true. pic 4 is all the ribs glued to the keel. The rig is made up of pieces of ali angle which was a damaged length from when my greenhouse was delivered last year, all i have done is cut 12 pieces approx 10-15mm wide and drilled 1 hole for fixing to the board. I then marked out the board for where the ribs need to be and fixed two of the brackets for either side of the ribs and used a length of 6x2 beech long enough to be clamped to both angles which was for clamping the ribs too, 1 piece of angle was placed at the front and stern to hold the keel square to the board which is a scrap bit of OSB. Each rib was dry fitted to the keel for any fine tuning using a set square to insure square and true, once i was happy with the results i dismantled it and refitted glueing the ribs in place again double checking with the set square to check for any movement in the jig.

Detailing continues! by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Have spent half a day adding more details to the decks. First thing was to remove and prime, paint and laquer the rear railings. Then spent some time making a job of fairing in the remoevable deck so that it blends better, still a way to go on that before I am satisfied. Other jobs included making some plasticard/tube bollards and the fore lifting eye, drill and temp fitting/modifying the side railings, fitting some faileads and making the front towing bollard thingy. Also fashioned from ply, plasticard and brass wire and front escape hatch, sanded, primed and painted orange, will fit when deck is finished. Having studied the Waveney book I have, it looks like I am going to have to butcher and modify the coxswains cabin quite extensivly as the kit version is based on the Coast Guard 44 footer, quie alot different to our RNLI boats? that will come back end of April as sadly I wong get alot done till then as away on a 2 week course from Sunday (Leaving the Army after 35 years service, having to resettle into CivDiv!)

Graupner ranzow refitting by kmbcsecretary Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Here we have the working radar and search light . The radar was easily converted to working by using a micro geared motor rated at 300-1 controlled by a micro speed controller thanks to mr rc world electrics. The original radar mould was first filed flat underneath then a small hole was drilled and a brass rod was glued into the hole with about 5mm sticking out and this was attached to the micro motor using some heat shrink. The second pic shows the micro motor hidden in the bracket

After Deck / Hatch - If at first you don't succeed ... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
give up and go home! Oh! I am home 😁 Since I need access to the rudder the after deck has to be made as a removable hatch. Would you believe at the last refit (25 years ago) I actually managed to shoehorn the RX and RX NiMH battery in there as well!? Pic 1 shows what it looked like when I started this refit, after 20 odd years in the cellar 😲 Anyway, I wanted the deck to be mahogany to match the cabin roof and as a hatch it was obvious that it would need a subframe. Pic 2 to 5, had to open a new bag of chomp chomp clamps 😉 Trial fit Pic 6. SFSG! Under side was sealed with two coats of EzeKote and fixings added; neodymium magnets at the forward edge, domed captive nyloc nuts glued into the under frame at the aft edge. Pics 7 & 8. These will then accept 4mm studs screwed into Riva style fuel filler caps to hold it down and (hopefully) keep it watertight. Mahog was then finished in the same laborious and patience testing process described above (or is it below😲) for the cabin roof and decks. Pic 9 shows it screwed down with normal 4mm 'Camembert' head screws - Why? see below 😆 Finish was OK.. BUT After leaving screwed down overnight a hairline crack had developed 😡 Pic 10. Also, I didn't like the 3mm fillets between the hatch deck and the main deck, and was wondering what to do about the lip on the bulkhead at the rear of the cockpit. There was a chunk cut out in the middle. This was where in the old days we had a tiller bar to set the rudder for Free Running on a great circle (Radnor Park Lake in Folkestone - side note for Graham P74, probably before he was born😉) Sooo .... machined the lip away, removed the 3mm fillets, made a cardboard template for the new deck-piece and tomorrow is another day. Wonder what I can muck up then !!?? 😊 G'night all, ciao Doug 😎 Oh yes the Filler caps - drilled them on the lathe for 4mm thread clearance, dug out the tap set, selected 4mm 0.7mm pitch ..... Oh S..t, only a tapered tap which starts cutting at 5mm. Hole in the cap is only 5mm deep.😡 Immediately ordered 4mm parallel machine tap, should be here on Wednesday. No sweat, should have deck hatch Mk. 2 finished by then 😎

1-35 scale S100 schennllboot blog by teejay Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi all this is my first blog, last year I post my intention to do a project about an RAF D boat that my Father served on and as a precursor to that build That I was going to do this S/E boat as the hull design is shared buy both, and as plastic kit modeller the kit great the first stage was to put together the decks and superstructure as normal, with the exception of all the bits that would be easily broken as most kit aircraft modellers aerials and guns tend to brake ,so long ago I got into the habit of making these out brass rod or bar using a mini drill and a set of needle files, holding the drill in my left hand and the files in my right, when started this I saw the number of stanches I needed so I came across this little beauty a mini bead lathe it is a great bit of kit and not expensive less than £50 and plenty of types and accessories available so all the stanches aerials hand rails, gun rails, horn, and some of the components for the rudder and tiller were made on this lathe. so good time being had in my first radio control boat . the next post will show all the parts for the rudder/tiller setup

Help Needed new Builder Billings St Canute by Richard7 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
Hello, l am very new to this forum and this is my first post so here goes. I have just started the Billing kit St Canute and l have installed the prop and rudder shaft. I found out that it is best to complete fig 1, 2, 3of the building instructions. But before l did that l drilled a small hole in part 53 for the rudder& prop shaft. Then glued all the parts. Before planking l cut away where both shafts, glued (2 part glue) both in place. My problem which l hope someone could help me with is fitting the M500 motor, as far as l can see l am going to have to remove a lot of wood from the keel part 00 and bulk head 5 so l can fit a support for the motor bracket as it looks like the motor has to fit very low so it aligns with the prop shaft. This has to be done at this stage as it would be almost impossible to do this with the planking in place. Can anyone help with any advise regarding fitting the M500 motor to the St Canute? Appreciate any help, thanks Richard7