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>> Home > Tags > drill

drill
drill
PS Waverley by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 hours ago
Hi Martin, My stanchions were pre-drilled, from Graupner ca 30 Years ago. Never 'eard of Modelling Timbers. Timber stanchions!!!😲 I "only" had to drill the holes in the decks (thought that was what you meant), there were enough of them. Much worse though was fitting all the two part portholes 😡 Since fibre glassing the the hull I have to do that all over again😭 Frankly I think anyone who gets so many stanchions made as castings without pre-drilled rail holes need his bumps feeling. I thoroughly agree ref mini drills, too easy to snap fine drill bits. 👍 For precision / repetitive drilling I use my Proxxon mini milling machine as a drill press. If I need more than one of something I knock up a simple jig (usually from hardwood taken from demolished old furniture) to hold the work piece in the machine vice attached to the milling machine cross bed. I took the irritating collet fixing off the mill and fitted a real 3 jaw chuck 😉 Happy 'Vincenting', All the best, Doug 😎

PS Waverley by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 hours ago
Doug I will PM David. Been busy all day dealing with casting problems on the wheels of the Vincent and making dozens of dummy nuts'n'bolts. I would have thought you'd have used Modelling Timbers for pre-drilled stanchions. His prices were so low, but now, alas, he's gone. I would probably make a little jig to drill the cast stanchions. I think boredom would set in before I broke a drill, but you're bang on about hand held minidrills. They go too fast and cannot be held really firmly. I use mine for cutting and grinding, shaping and polishing. I have a very small pillar drill with a buggy motor adapted to hold a small Jacobs chuck and run off a variable transformer. Today I drilled 40 1mm holes in the pattern for the Vincent rear wheel to assist the mould maker. All went very well. Cheers, Martin

PS Waverley by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 hours ago
Don't have to imagine it Martin, I know it, from all the stanchions on my H class destroyer 😉 Couldn't get the ship under a pillar drill. Free-handing a Dremel type drill is more likely to bend the bit. Did my destroyer in batches and amused meself with summat else in between . Each to his own, Happy pillaring (never tried drilling a pillar meself 😁) Have you tried PMing david greatbatch to see what he's got plan-wise? Cheers, Doug 😎

PS Waverley by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 hours ago
Thanks for the offer, Marky, but it's specifically the Waverley we need drawings for, or rather the superstructure. Sarik have a set, but hardly exhaustive. I suppose general dimensions and all the hundreds of photos will have to do, unless any of you guys know differently. I was going to ask on Paddleducks but they are talking closing down for lack of use and age of the membership, so no point asking there. Doug, can you imagine the repetitive stress problems of twiddling a pin chuck that many times? I have a lovely old fine feed pillar drill, but it's in bits being cleaned and repainted. Cheers, Martin

PS Waverley by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 18 hours ago
Yes, that's what I liked; well populated and 'Alive'. Makes all the difference, especially for an excursion ship. 😉 If he uses a Dremel or similar he'll probably break lots 😡 I use a small pin chuck for my 0.3 - 1.0mm drills, gives more control and 'feel'. @ Marky; thought I remembered you paddlin' about somewhere😉 just got the ship wrong 🤔 How's it goin' matey? Now back to prepping terrace and garden for winter 😡 me poor ol' back! Cheers All, Doug 😎

PS Waverley by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 18 hours ago
Thanks for the link, Doug. Nice job and lots of people on it. I think my mate is going to do the finish as it is now with grained wood effect superstructure and shit brown vents. He'll probably want me to do a bras pattern for the stanchions and get them cast by my chap round the corner. I wonder how many half mil. drills he'll break! Cheers, Martin

Old outboard motor... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
Hi Doug, I do have a Hobbyking CNC ally one and now have a brushless inrunner for it. I got it when they were very cheap a while back. Wouldn't pay what they now want for them and Graupner are always way overpriced. I could be tempted with 7 quid for a Hobbies one though, just to see how it goes together. The K&O are gorgeous but collector money and the Alterscale are dummies, albeit nice dummies and also bloody expensive. I sliced the little vintage jobby I bought down the joint line with a fine saw blade in the minidrill today and all is well. It just needs new wires and some grease when I can find some good styrene/nylon grease. The motor is a two magnet Kako, many examples of which I have in store. Even has a nice little built in switch. I reckon 3 volts is probably all the transmission can take. The gears are not, as I assumed bevels, but 2 spur gears! I now have to find a way of making the prop shaft stay on the motor shaft! I'm loving this restoration stuff. Painted the red on my Star yacht today with my best chisel headed sable and got a special 1/4 litre of the emerald green mixed in HMG enamel (the very best there is). Tried to win a lovely Starlet off ebay, but some sod beat me to it last minute. I hope it leaks Martin

Rudders and Propellers by teejay Commander   Posted: 8 days ago
Hi all for the second blog report on the schnellboot I am going to go over the rudder a propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat, these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts. which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel) and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum powder mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The fourth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I must ask for some help could anyone advise me on the length of propeller shafts, I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft, but port and starboard will have to be longer. and I also need advice on selecting the motors, I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.

1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay by teejay Commander   Posted: 8 days ago
Hi all this is my first blog, last year I post my intention to do a project about an RAF D boat that my Father served on and as a precursor to that build That I was going to do this S/E boat as the hull design is shared by both, and as plastic kit modeller the kit great the first stage was to put together the decks and superstructure as normal, with the exception of all the bits that would be easily broken as most kit aircraft modellers aerials and guns tend to brake ,so long ago I got into the habit of making these out brass rod or bar using a mini drill and a set of needle files, holding the drill in my left hand and the files in my right, when started this I saw the number of stanches I needed so I came across this little beauty a mini bead lathe it is a great bit of kit and not expensive less than £50 and plenty of types and accessories available so all the stanches aerials hand rails, gun rails, horn, and some of the components for the rudder and tiller were made on this lathe. so good time being had in my first radio control boat. the next post will show all the parts for the rudder/tiller setup ( I have reposted blog because I think I did not do it properly first time round)

Old outboard motor... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
Hi all, just won an outboard motor which is exactly like the one on a plastic day boat I had as a kid. Alas, it ran away on Lake Vyrnwy on our first Welsh holiday and that was the end of that. This one has only one wire and it feels like the motor is loose, so I will have to get a slitting saw in the minidrill and carefully slice the thing in half to get to them, but it'll give me the chance to lubricate the gears, etc. If it needs new ones, I have brass bevels from a stash of MRRC slot racing parts. Ain't nought can't be fixed. Beauty of this motor is it says it's made in England. Looks like a Mercury 75 "Tower of Power". Nice! Martin Edited to say nearly 60 years old! The motor. I'm older.

Cabin roof hatches by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 days ago
Apropos 'Inspiration' Michael'! Great stuff 👍 Hinges like that are just what I want to make on my Sea Scout. I plan to make mine from 0.3mm brass and working!😲 Will also use my mini milling machine as s precision drill press as you did👍 Cheers, Doug 😎

Cabin roof hatches by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 days ago
Rear cabin hatches I have decided to make these two roof hatches detachable (not working) purely to ease the painting and rubbing down process. The hatches on the rear cabin are supplied in pieces to be glued together, so to make them detachable I drilled a hole through the base of each and glued an 8BA screw in place, these can then be secured after final painting to the roof. The hatch also has a dummy-hinged lid and small white metal hinges are supplied, however they do need some attention, such as drilling all the holes and trimming the edges. Here we go again, time for a jig! Repartition can be achieved with the simplest of jigs; all I used was coffee stirrers pinned to a block of wood and one as a locking device. The jig was then placed under the milling machine and the first hole centred, drilled and then the next hinge is placed in the jig and drilled and so on, move to the next hole until all holes are drilled. Before fitting the hinges there needs to be a separation line for the lid and hinge plate so a scored line about halfway through the ply. The hinges are fitted with epoxy and brass pins through all the fixing holes. Mid cabin hatch This is a single hatch, again a square of ply is supplied, but this is improved by adding sides, which can locate on runners, again the runners are not supplied. This hatch is also attached with a single screw epoxied into the top and a nut, after final painting. Forward cabin hatch Again, a single hatch and dealt with in the same way as the mid hatch.

Darby One Design hydro... by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Well Col tell us about these choppers. What engines are they using. Ignition type etc . Because if you can reproduce this fuel you could make a fortune flogging it.😁👍 No names no pack drill we don't need to know that just the blend of the fuel.🤔 This secret has been sought after for years.😤

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
Adjusted the transom flaps and reprogrammed the ESCs to the softest start settings, retested. Until now, the test runs did not have the duration or stability to really examine what was happening. Using 3 S batteries acceleration is rapid and a is plane quickly achieved. However, as the acceleration continues and speed increases, the bow digs in. A cloud of spray then surrounds the model as the plane is lost. Brushless motors do not modulate as smoothly as brushed and adjusting power tends to be erratic or exaggerated. This is a scale model and the propeller shaft angles are per the plans. The thrust from the propeller has two components, horizontal and vertical. The horizontal propels the vessel forward. However, the vertical component forces the stern upwards and, correspondingly, the bow down. Have moved as much weight as possible towards the stern to counteract this, limited by maintaining the correct displacement and waterline. The easiest solution is to reduce motor power, decreasing both speed and the lifting component. Decided to retry the 2S batteries as they give reduced power. A plane is again achieved, but as the motor response is more docile, it can be controlled. If the speed gets too high the bow lowers, as before, but the motor output can be more easily adjusted. Spent a pleasant half hour or so with the vessel accelerating onto and off a nice, controllable plane. Much less spray and drama than with 3S and much more controllable. Have now decided to revise plans and use 2S rather than 3 batteries. A further advantage is the motor noise is muted and now sounds more like a gas turbine than a dental drill! Finally feeling comfortable with the model. Will thus shelve further building until the late fall when sailing in Canada concludes. Want to enjoy the rest of my fleet in the meantime! Will summarize my experiences with brushless motors in another blog shortly for the benefits of others contemplating their use. After restarting the model will resurrect periodic build blogs to advise progress.

Taycol Supemarine Resurrection by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 29 days ago
Hi Martin, Apropos mini Milling machines; this is the one I use. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qffdG_d2fJ0 https://www.axminster.co.uk/proxxon-mf-70-milling-machine-37... Pics show using it to mill my new Sea Scout propshaft to secure the grub screws in the motor coupling. I just changed the tool holder from collets to a proper chuck. I also bought the little machine vice which clamps to the table, and the dividing head. There is also a CNC (putah driven version - ain't got that far yet, bit expensive😉) But this little job has served me well for several years now, very happy with it👍 I also use it as a precision drill press; e.g. to make the new phosphor bronze brushes for my Taycol target renovation. See last pic. Have also recently used it to make the little gearbox so I can fit the renovated Taycol Target into my ancient Billing Danish fish cutter 'Gina2'. See, I don't just do the 'Grey Fleet', sometimes I also mess with wood😁 Cheers, Doug 😎