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>> Home > Tags > electric

electric
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electric
SeaSpray by pjarrett Petty Officer   Posted: 4 days ago
[Score: 8/10] 38"/5000g SeaSpray Capable of 12mph and a runtime of 20mins Single Propellor (2 Blade S Type 35mm) Direct Drive to a MFA 850 (2 Blade S Type) Powered by LiPoly (11.1v) 6Amp/h Batteries - Comments: Purchased as kit around 1972, fibre glass hull with ply deck and superstructure. Had many changes and refits over the years and was originally fitted with and OS Marine glow engine which gave good performance and was quiet! Changed to the MFA electric motor with ESC. Installed two LiPo batteries which makes the hull well balanced and allows the deep V hull design to plane as designed. Have designed and made two electro-magnetic lifting sticks which help me raise and lower the boat into the water. Age related launching aid!

Prop Shaft Grease by robhenry Seaman   Posted: 5 days ago
Hi. I have always used molybnedenum disuphide grease made up to a thin creamy consistency with "3 in 1 oil" or similar. This has worked well on fast electrics, fast scale boats etc.

Clyde Puffer by Hugh Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 6 days ago
Hi Alan, I, too, am building a Clyde Puffer. Mine is scratch built ,and same scale as yours. I have installed a 6:1 brushed electric motor. I wanted scale speed . The shaft length was 11" from memory. Interested in how you get on. Clyde puffers were lovely ships. Cheers Hugh

none by lesliebreame Captain   Posted: 7 days ago
Experimenting with steam flash boiler and it looks promising!!! Better make a pump next instead of the syringe but I don't expect the little oscillator will cope. If it doesn't will make a small electric one. Need an ice breaker today !!! Les

Clyde Puffer by Ballast Captain   Posted: 8 days ago
Hi Everyone. My next build is a Clyde Puffer in the guise of Auld Reekie/Vital Spark ! I am starting with a 1/24 Scale GRP Hull from Orion Mouldings. I am in need of a bit of forward planning assistance so if anyone has built from the same hull or very similar I would be grateful for some input as regards size of electric motor length of shaft and prop size and anything else that could be of help to me. This is only my second build so I am still, very much a rookie !!! Alan.

Imara by Banchang-modeller Seaman   Posted: 10 days ago
Hi there, a good looking boat, well done. I also have an Imara which I am currently outfitting the motors (Caldercraft CEM 900T) and electrics, but need advice on the amount of ballast required to get it the correct waterline What was the total weight of the ballast you used? Many Thanks..........Richard

850 Brushless by BOATSHED Captain   Posted: 10 days ago
Hi canabus, could you please tell me what brushless motor's you have in your, Sea Hornet,Sea Commander and Sea Queen pelese. I have all three of these as well. Somewhere down the line I will be converting those to brushless. I don't understand all the electrical data myself. I do have a Proboat Miss Geico and she is awesome on the water at full speed. I have purchased the same motor and speed controller as what is in her to put in a new MFA Spearfish that I still have on the shelf in my work shed. I look forward to your set up's.

Cumbrae No.1 by cumbrae Apprentice   Posted: 13 days ago
[Score: 9/10] 35"/5000g Cumbrae No.1 Capable of 3mph and a runtime of 120mins Direct Drive to a Mtronics viper15 (3 Blade) Powered by Lead Acid (6v) 5Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Mtronics viper15 (2 of) ESC - Comments: Acquired this and several other boats from a friend whose late father had built. Extensively renovated, new electrics and drive-train, bow-thruster, and a motorised radar scanner. Cumbrae actually sported a "Bobs Board" for those of you who can remember that!!!

Prop Shaft Grease by boaty Commander   Posted: 18 days ago
Hi Andy I use Dynamite Marine grease both on my fast electric and scale boats. You can purchase this from Wheelspin Models and you can also buy a grease gun from them as well😋. It is brilliant for whatever boat you own and with the gun you can really lubricate the whole propshaft. Boaty

Power Cabling by NPJ Captain   Posted: 19 days ago
So following a long away week-end of Astronomy, now trying to get a bit further before going away for a couple of days. As I start to wire up the power circuit I realise how important it is to think things through first! Made up the link from the Battery to a ‘choc block’ distribution point which for space reasons is under the ‘control’ platform which will fill the bow area. (Pic 1) The fuse boards were obtained from Component – shop.co.uk Ltd in Bangor which is a good source of all sorts of electrical bits for us and is in Wales! (Pic2) The Dual Esc/Mixer, from the same place, a P94 9Lite), I have secured with Velcro (Pic 3) and I hope to keep the battery on top of this with a little air gap. It is at this point that I really came to appreciate the space limitations (Pic 4) and I do not have the motors wired in yet which will have fuse boards on the ‘platform’. (Pic 5). Next time hope to wire in Motors and Fuse Boards, Sound Generator and Receiver. Then see how it sits in the bath.....! NPJ

NimH advice by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Hi Alex They will be connected in series with the positive connected to the negative. I suggest you carefully cut off the heat shrink covering, taking care not to cut into the cells. You can then check each cells voltage. The nominal is 1.2v rising to 1.4v when charged. Any around 1v or less will never hold a charge so mark them with a marker pen. Hopefully it will be one of the end cells that has failed. On your type of pack the bottom of the battery (negative) will be in a metal case attached to the top (positive) of the next cell. I use a flat blade screwdriver to separate the cells (they are spot welded) and sometimes you can get the case off the bottom of the dud cell, leaving it attached to the positive of the next cell. I suggest you then charge the remaining good cells to see if they all take a full charge. If they are OK you can get a new cell or just make a lower voltage pack. I use a piece of stranded wire to repair the joint. You will need a 40+watt iron and some solder paste, and may need to scratch the battery case and pin for the solder to take. If you were careful with removing the heat shrink you can use it to cover the pack with a bit of electrical tape to make good. Please ask if you need any guidance with the process. I have been doing this for many years and may not have explained in enough detail if it's new to you. Do remember if the battery is charged it can short in its unwrapped state so do make sure you bench is uncluttered and kept clear of any metal objects. Good luck

choosing an electric motor by Haverlock Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Since quite a few boats were intended to run IC engines and now we use electrics these two pages may be of use to those scratching their heads as to the size of brushless to choose http://lmmac.net/i-c-to- style='background-color:yellow;'>electric-conversion-table/ http://www.cmfhobbies.com/IC-Engine-to-Electric-motor-conver... Hope it helps someone

huntsman 46 by canabus Admiral   Posted: 24 days ago
Hi Pilot If you are using 540 can size (35-36mm brushless motor) a 3639-1100kv 800watts, 3648-1450 1600watts or a XK 3674-1900 1769 watts. All run on 100Amp ESCs, but check the maximum voltage they handle. I use car ESCs with the electric fan on top because they run cooler at slow speeds and no water plumbing required. The same with the motors no cooling. Props for these motors 37mm 2 blade or 40-45 mm 2 blade. If you go for a larger motor for a larger prop, a L5055-700kv 1600watts same ESC, but, start with a 2 blade prop about 52mm. Battery a 3-6S 5800mah or more with a C rating of 40 plus. I have used the 35mm motors in 34 to 40" boats, but, for my 46" Vosper Crash Tender I am going to the 5055. To large a prop will cause over heating of the ESC, battery and Motor. A in line amp meter(Hobbyking 9598000004-0) is the one in use. It reads the maximum amps, so for run speed amps slow speed up to maximum as a hit the throttle hard will give you maximum amps. Canabus

huntsman 46 by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Hi Pilot, first of all welcome to the forum. Do you have any modeling experience?? Which kit or plan are you using??? I would recommend an outrunner look for one with about 700 - 800 watt output, 3s or 4s rated with an ESC rated at least 100 - 150 amps, as a start with a 40 - 45mm brass prop. Kit or plan, reduce the angle of the propshaft to about 15 - 20 degrees electric motors can lie lower in the hull which was designed for I/C motors with their flywheel hanging below the motor, needing extra clearance. Suppliers. Have a look at the hobbyking site, for motor and esc, once you have the basic build underway, decide on the batteries you are going to use. Hope this helps as a starter, look round the web sites get more info and we can direct you further as to your requirements Regards Mark

wardrobe by philpjuk Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 26 days ago
yes still clockwork,The best improvements have been made by lightening the motor, drilling holes in everything and replacing a side plate with one made of alloy.It is just a nut on the sponson, they are adjustable for incidence.It will now plane on the sponsons "unsticking" the hull.The original was built when I was 13/14,the motor came from the family gramophone when my dad converted it to autochanger/amplifier,the wood came from the woodshed but I was short of plywood and realised the back of my wardrobe was plywood and was hidden behind clothes so when my parents were out I cut the bits I needed from it!,my mates christened it "the wardrobe".Performance is down to propeller choice and is a compromise between speed and runtime.I took it to a boating pond in a nearby town when my wife needed to visit it and a council "jobsworth" told me I was not allowed to sail it,"only yachts and electric boats on here sir"no amount of reasoning would make him change his mind and he escorted me out of the park!.