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>> Home > Tags > electric

electric
action electronics
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electric
Electric Barbarella by Krampus Admiral   Posted: 2 days ago
Thank you!👍

Electric Barbarella by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 2 days ago
Real nice job, like the lit dash, nice touch.

boiler and struts by rcmodelboats Commander   Posted: 4 days ago
As this model will be Electric a mock boiler will be put in place for aesthetics as it can be seen clearly if you look directly front on, on the real ship. The struts that come out of the hull are for a extra piece of deck that then connects to the paddle boxes.

Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels) by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
After the Christmas break its back to the cabin to finish some of the instrument detail. You may recall I detailed the cockpit with some ply constructions to represent the general layout; I also intend to detail the compass, throttle controls, steering wheel, panel lighting, and instrument panel. The instrument panel was copied and scaled from various drawing and pictures and I came up with a three-panel unit where panels 1 & 3 are identical as they are for the two-engine managements system the centre panel deals with electrical things. I intend to make the panel out of 1.5 mm aluminium cut to size on the guillotine I then attached this to a hardwood block with some strong double sided tape this will be more than strong enough to hold the piece for the drilling/light milling operation. I worked out the hole positions using an absolute datum (same as CNC work, if only I was still working) This does take some time using my rather old milling machine making sure any backlash is taken out during the 28 linear movements. I used various sizes of centre drills to produce the holes as they give not only accurate size but also perfectly round holes on thin material and the only ones that needed to be a particular size (6mm dial holes) the others are for switches and LEDs which can all be a 3 mm location hole. Each hole was drilled and then chamfered to simulate a bezel on the dials. Finally, I milled a shallow groove (2mm x 0.3 deep) to simulate the separate panels. I have copied a number of different marine dials from the internet and using PowerPoint I aligned in a complete group and then printed and laminated them, this will be placed behind the aluminium plate using double-sided tape. Having fixed the dials in place I drilled through the holes where LEDSs will fit. The LEDs will be shortened and polished so they are flat to the face; these are then stuck in place. Next, I made all the switches from brass bar with a fine brass pin glued across its face to simulate the lever. These were painted gloss black and the centre pin picked out in red, they were then glued into the 3 mm location hole. The black knobs/pull switches were turned out of black Perspex and polished; they were then glued into the location holes. The whole instrument panel is then pinned on to the wooden framework which has been left in natural wood finish (ply) as it looks like the original boat was just a varnished ply finish.

Furled sails powered yacht with inboard motor by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 17 days ago
Any one with pictures of their Sloop, Yawl, or otherwise where the sailboat is powered by a small electric motor? The sails furled. My Gypsy did not sail well, but could be modified for power.

Electric Barbarella by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Hi Krampus, You did a fantastic job on your model.👍 She looks very good, Great detail! The Captain better pay attention. Looking at the girl.....😋 Regards, Ed

Electric Barbarella by Krampus Admiral   Posted: 19 days ago
Ahoy Maties! It's been a long time since my last posting. Happy 2019! I just completed my new scratch-built boat "Electric Barbarella". I tried to recreate (with some liberties) one of my favorite boats of all time, the 30-footer Chris Craft Sportsman built during the 1970s. It measures 24 X 8.5 inches. It is powered with a 9.6 NiMH 4200 mAh battery "nunchuck" pack (like the one used for paintball guns), brushless motor attached to a 30A Mtroniks Hydra controller and a 30mm M4 3-bladed brass propeller. The hull (my own on-the-go design) was made out of Balsa wood which later I fiberglassed. For the superstructure I utilized 2mm ABS plastic sheet material. To my surprise the boat turned to be a very stable and forgiving platform. I really feel a very close connection to this vessel as it is my first own hull design.😁

Crack in seam Repaired! by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
Captain's Log: Cracked seam Update! She has been sitting in the Domesticated Test Tank. For 20.0 hours and she is dry as a bone!😁😁😁 Eureka, Tug Brooklyn is now repaired! Now all I have to do. Is Spray her bottom! And just a few electrical repairs. And she'll be ready for her spring Maiden Voyage! Long awaited but, patients is a virtue!👍

Internal wiring & bottom skins by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
Rob, if all is OK maybe you have proved different to the current thinking, I hope so, because as you know electrics is complicated enough without having to consider the length of the wire, I'm happy if the bulb lights up, that's an achievement!!

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
After completing the cowl, turned to the rear structure covering the gas turbine and other engine spaces. This can readily be made from styrene sheet. The sides and top were cut out, reinforced with “L” shaped angle and fitted together with CA glue. No particular challenges, other than determining where the various section transitions occur. Luckily had two different sets of plans to compare, so the nuances could be established. It was not until the rear structure was fitted into the cowl, the assembly fitted to the removable deck and placed on the hull, realized just how important this milestone was. Once everything is firmly located the accuracy of build becomes readily apparent. Any inaccuracies show up as an obvious misalignment. Was able to check the alignments and squareness using eye, rules, squares and a spirit level and was pleased with the outcome. A subtle sanding of about .020” off the base of one side of the superstructure and everything became square, parallel and correctly aligned. Quite a relief! Have always stressed the importance of accuracy throughout a build. This supported that recommendation. Once the superstructure was completed realized my plan to lift the deck off to gain access to the electrical control switches was impractical. Have thus cut a small access hole in the rear deck to facilitate access. Still undecided how to best disguise the hole, but at least access is now relatively easy. From now on, until the test program can be continued on the water, will add detail to the model. Doubt there will be much to describe is that of interest, or that has not been covered by others. Will continue this blog once there is anything significant to report. In the meantime, best wishes for Christmas and 2019,

Outboard Motors by BigChris Seaman   Posted: 1 month ago
I have acquired an old 50cm wooden model boat which requires a vintage style electric outboard motor. I am finding sourcing a motor very difficult. I would welcome advice. I am willing to take a second hand motor if anyone has one.

Modern electrics by deltaman Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi all, Not been araound for awhile as I have been playing with aircraft as well, I have however found time to scratch build a Fairy Huntsman which I now want to upgrade to modern electrics, a brushless motor and esc etc, should I avoid lipo's due to the heat issues or can I use them ok. The hull is 42 inches long any suggestions on motor size would be appreciated, also esc size, the boat seems a bi on the heavy side. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Thunder Tiger Avanti by boaty Admiral   Posted: 1 month ago
Has anyone done any significant modifications to a Thunder Tiger Avanti fast electric? I have one and all I have done is to replace the nylon prop with a metal one thus there is very little increase in performance and the reason for doing this was due to the nylon prop throwing a blade after striking an underwater object. Prestwich Model Boats have a suitable replacement motor complete with a better ESC than the existing Ace one and their system can handle up to 4S Lipos instead of the stock set up of 3s . I have located a source of a 4S Lipo which length and width is same as my 3S one but the height is a little more and it will fit into the battery box. To trim it out properly I would have to add some ballast to the starboard side. Due to the electrics including the battery all being in a small watertight box at the stern there is not a great amount of scope for a lot of mods. Boaty😁

Century Sea Maid & Reflections sport fishing boat by Davevand Seaman   Posted: 1 month ago
Sea Maid run about, electric. Reflections fishing boat, electric.

RMAS MSBV Goldeneye by Nutbourne Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 5/10] 48" RMAS MSBV Goldeneye Single Propellor Direct Drive Controlled Through None at the moment ESC - Comments: RMAS. MSBV ( Mooring Salvage Boom Vessel) Goldeneye scratch built plank on frame the hull was built by a friend more than thirty years ago double diagional,recently renovated no motor or electrics yet. Its a bit of a beast at just over 4' long and 9" beam. Still building it.