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>> Home > Tags > enamel

enamel
enamel
Painting by steve-d Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 days ago
I have a Huntsman 31 model I am refurbishing. The paint is peeling off from age, the muppet who painted it only applied one coat (Me), the Humbrol enamel was probably too thick for the fine grain of the birch ply and spruce. I am planning to start with cellulose sanding sealer as it is nice and thin so should get a good key into the grain. So.. What paint should I use over the sealer? Some parts of the ply I want to look like teak deck planking so first I think I need a stain. Then line in the planks with fibre tip pen followed by what type of varnish? Some of the spruce needs to look like mahogany so do I stain it or use some sort of paint? Thanks Steve

Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc.... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
Here's the yacht after the first coat of red enamel and the keel sprayed with self etch primer ready for the green later, but it's raining, dammit! Martin

Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc.... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
My wee red boat after a rub down and a file/sand on the steel keel. This morning I painted the red with HMG enamel and got the green mixed in the same make enamel by my wonderful chap at Kett's Auto Paints. The mast came in two parts, so I did a slight scarf and glued it. When the joint is well set, I'll make a splint and set it in prior to a rub down and a good waxing. The steel (tinplate) parts came with the predictable rust, but with my selection of scrapers and chisels made of broken and worn Swiss files I was able to scrape most of it off back to reasonable shiny steel. The out of shapeness needed only a clout with a cold chisel type of bodywork tool in the right places to restore it to original shape. Loops were filed to lose most of their rust, but not replaced. They'll be Vaselined as a form of anti rust, waterproofing. I have some new 1.3mm cord coming from Caldercraft. I just hope I can remember how it was rigged. I ain't great with knots. The sails were absolutely filthy with some sort of oil based grime, but my dear bride sorted them out with Vanish and a good hand wash. Pics of those tomorrow. I love this stuff.! Martin

Old outboard motor... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Hi Doug, I do have a Hobbyking CNC ally one and now have a brushless inrunner for it. I got it when they were very cheap a while back. Wouldn't pay what they now want for them and Graupner are always way overpriced. I could be tempted with 7 quid for a Hobbies one though, just to see how it goes together. The K&O are gorgeous but collector money and the Alterscale are dummies, albeit nice dummies and also bloody expensive. I sliced the little vintage jobby I bought down the joint line with a fine saw blade in the minidrill today and all is well. It just needs new wires and some grease when I can find some good styrene/nylon grease. The motor is a two magnet Kako, many examples of which I have in store. Even has a nice little built in switch. I reckon 3 volts is probably all the transmission can take. The gears are not, as I assumed bevels, but 2 spur gears! I now have to find a way of making the prop shaft stay on the motor shaft! I'm loving this restoration stuff. Painted the red on my Star yacht today with my best chisel headed sable and got a special 1/4 litre of the emerald green mixed in HMG enamel (the very best there is). Tried to win a lovely Starlet off ebay, but some sod beat me to it last minute. I hope it leaks Martin

Styrene Allergy? by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
Styrene fumes? You'll only get fumes if you heat it. My chum works a vac-former to make model car glazing and he thoroughly washes every sheet of PVC before forming it. Stops micro-bubbles forming. I use blue nitriles when epoxying. I always found latex melted on contact with most of the things I used, like enamel paint, Marineflex, etc. Nitriles stay put. Martin

Paints by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
Hmm! Let's 'Cut to the chase'! First; I've never been on a ship, naval or civil, and I've been on a few during my 30 odd year career designing COMMS systems for ships, mostly naval, that used gloss paints OR matt paints. Matt paint, whether for scale or full size, rapidly shows the wear marks where folks tread or grab or where we habitually grab it on models. This rapidly creates a shiny effect, like the seat of your favourite, most comfortable and ancient trousers (which the Missus probably wanted to throw out years ago but you are fighting a REARguard action) 😁 During WW2 the emphasis was on reducing the reflectivity of paints on warships. Gloss on a ship / boat MAY not look any different from satin or matt at a distance BUT; it will reflect sunlight and flash which attracts attention and betrays the presence of the vessel. Furthermore gloss shows the wear and tear marks much sooner than satin. Whether matt paints were available or not in those days I don't know, but even if they were I don't think they would have been used after the initial durability tests on board. Having seen the paint part numbers, all BS381C xxx, specified on the Thornycroft 'blueprints' that Martin sent me, I would say that the paint colours you need Morkullen are RN Light Weatherworks grey BS381C 676 = Colour Coats M01 RN Dark Admiralty grey BS381C 632 = Colour Coats M16 RN Light Admiralty grey BS381C 697= Colour Coats M23 See page 3 of the colour chart, see attached colour charts from Sovereign Hobbies for their Colour Coats paints, which have been derived from original Admiralty paint chips.. Colour Coats are enamel. If you prefer acrylic try Life Colour set CS33 Royal Navy WW2 Set 1. See page 6 of attached Life Colour catalogue. Happy painting, don't forget to post pics / vids of the results👍 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS have a look at the recent HMS Campbeltown 1/96 thread for further detail of the recent discussion on WW2 RN paints. BTW; if I feel after painting that the finish is still too glossy I give it a blast of Lord Nelson satin, or in extreme cases, matt clear varnish. Otherwise I agree with Reilly's comments👍

Paints by reilly4 Admiral   Posted: 15 days ago
I use Satin enamels as they are more durable than Matt finishes, especially on the hulls, but still go over them with clear matt enamel for realism. The 'scale' appearance is the consideration. From a distance a real boat even if finished with a gloss marine enamel would not look glossy. A WW2 boat such as an MTB would definitely have a Matt finish, and always 2 coats. Working models get scuffed in use.

Paints by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
I use enamels, always. They don't react with anything. Rustoleum do a range of colours in gloss and satin and are cheaper than any other rattle cans. I get mine from a branch of Boyes. The original was always a satin rather than a matt. Totally matt paint wasn't available then. Martin

Where's our mate?... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 18 days ago
Hi peter, 'Deck Blue' changed a few times over the years, there are lighter and darker shades depending on the theatre of operations and if detection from the air was paramount or not. Later in the war, when the axis air forces were largely destroyed and the allies had overwhelming air superiority the emphasis moved to the vertical surfaces to confuse subs and the few remaining surface ships the axis had. Then the emphasis switched back to the horizontal surfaces when the Kamikaze attacks developed. So probably the lighter Pacific variant is what you need for USS Kid at the end of the war. You are lucky that Kidd has been preserved as a museum ship in her 'end of war' state 👍 If you Google USS Kidd I'm sure you'll find the museum site with more colour pics. Also, the display on different web sites will depend on many variables, for instance:- How the sample was photographed; white balance, colour balance, lighting; intensity and type - Kelvin temperature etc. How the photos are digitally interpreted and integrated in the web site. The times of 'The camera never lies' are unfortunately long over! Added to that is how your PC or Dumbphone/tablet displays the web site, similar problems;- Type of display, colour / contrast / brilliance settings etc etc. Power saving settings can affect these! If I were you I would use the Measure 22 scheme as shown on the colour pic and described on the Wiki page. That's apparently what the USN went back to when the kamikaze attacks started. Your basic choice is enamel = Colour Coats, or Acrylic = LifeColor 😉 Personally, I would go for the 1944 dazzle scheme cos it's more interesting and unusual, but then I'm just NUTS! 😁 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Hofbrauhaus is for the tourists! I've been there maybe three times in 38 years? Once on my very first visit to Munich in 1980, then, after I started working here in 1985, only with customers who insisted on going there. Too loud and expensive, there are many better, less touristic, ones in Munich. Prost allseits! PPS haven't been to the Oktoberfest for years for similar reasons! 30 years ago it was still fun, but not now 🤔

Where's our mate?... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Evenin' Peter, Thanks 😉 Not quite 100% yet but getting there. Fit enough to answer your question I think, mainly cos I just bought a bunch of RN and USN paints meself😁 First off, have a shufti at this link, it details all 'Measures' up to # 23 near the end of the Pacific war. There's also a colour pic of USS Kidd wearing Measure 22 which was used on Destroyer Escorts (DE) at the time. https://www.wikiwand.com/en/World_War_II_ship_camouflage_mea... In 1944 it was replaced by a Dazzle pattern on the Fletchers, Measure 32, similar to RN Western Approaches pattern, until 1945 when they reverted to Measure 22 but with the revised Haze Gray. https://www.wikiwand.com/en/World_War_II_US_Navy_dazzle_camo... I also attach attach a colour chart from Sovereign Hobbies who took over the White Ensign Colour Coats range of navy enamel paints. Have a look at page 6. They are made by Snyder & Short from authentic Navy Paint Chips apparently. I just bought a bunch of them in RN colours for my 'Plastic Magic' conversions. Get 'em here- https://www.sovereignhobbies.co.uk/collections/colourcoats-s... If you prefer acrylic have a look at the LifeColor Sets # CS24 and CS25 'US Navy WWII'. Chart and catalogue attached. get here for instance- https://www.waylandgames.co.uk/lifecolor-paint-sets/43947-us... Happy painting, cheers, Doug 😎

St Canute Planking Help? by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
Doug, I don't decant my paint because you have to wait to de-gas it which I ain't got the patience to do. What made you think I did? I used the Rustoleum straight from the rattle can, but it's very thin and you have to watch its tendency to run. The rest is enamel (HRG) bought from the auto paint suppliers and I mix that with a little white spirit and it takes maybe three hours to dry which is fine. Either airbrush (Paasche Model H) or a small spray gun called a spotting or dent gun. Little compressor for the Paasche Model H and bigger one for the spotting gun. Cheers, Martin

HMS Campbeltown 1941, 1/96 scale by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 29 days ago
Hi Steve, I'll see what i can do. No promises as the range of Acrylics is somewhat more limited as far as Naval colours goes. One way out is to buy some Naval Paint Chips from Snyder & Short. http://www.shipcamouflage.com/royal_navy1.htm These are taken from the original chips of admiralty paints used to mix the Colour Coats enamel colours. Enables mixing to suit from more basic 'standard' colours. Bit of 'mix it and see' involved. Testors acrylics may be a better bet. They do some Naval colours. Also recommended by the HMS Hood Association. For instance; this would be good for hull and upperworks https://www.hobbylinc.com/testors-model-master-507-c-light-g... This for the decks? https://www.hobbylinc.com/testors-model-master-light-sea-gra... There are also some excellent tips on painting scale warships here😉 http://www.hmshood.com/hoodtoday/models/tips/hoodpaint.htm I've just been studying this for my 1/350 Hood, and just ordered a batch of suitable Colour Coats to paint her 'As Sunk' 😭 Cheers, Doug 😎

HMS Campbeltown 1941, 1/96 scale by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 30 days ago
Hey! That's a neat trick, having the 'smokers' down below who can then give you the cigar tubes for the funnels 😁😁 Seriously though folks, nice going so far Steve👍 A while ago I bought some 3D 4.7" guns for my H class destroyer, and was very disappointed to discover that nothing could be moved and the gun shield was virtually filled solid🤔 So back to the brass snipping and bashing. I like the LifeColour as well, colours seem pretty accurate to me and easy to use than enamel. Be a while 'til I start my mini version, no bench space at the moment. Cheers, Doug 😎 BTW: About time you started a Build Blog ain it??

Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Just got white metal castings back of the Chris Craft fittings and very nice they are too. They have started to burnish up a treat and will polish well as Paul uses a good quality metal. Nice and hard. Now I have to make the light lenses. Also put the blue bottom on her at the weekend using my one and only pot of Plastikote enamel paint, not the acrylic muck they've turned over to and it went on through my spray gun as smooth as could be. Even my masking worked. Just waiting for a gold pin stripe tape for the boot topping now. The final bit will be masking the deck to paint the covering boards and king plank with the same blue. For those not lucky enough to have a wee pot of proper Plastikote in the paint cupboard, I also got a couple of tins of Rustoleum spray, only 5-25 a pot, enamel (of course) in a nice French blue and a rich cream. These colours will look good on my Darby One Design single stepper "WHO'S DARBY?". Very post War. I think the Oulton Broad One Design single stepper will be Burgundy and the Whippet One Design will be varnished mahogany. I know of no other classes of British stepped hydroplanes. These will all be 1/6th scale as they're all around 12-13 ft. long. I'll probably put the same motors in them eventually. The Darby is well advanced and has a Speed 400, but I may go brushless. Any suggestions for a cheap Brushless/ESC combo will be welcome for, say, 3S Li-Pos. It would be good to see these period boats all racing together. I also plan to make reverse clinker Singer cadet and a Percy See Bugatti engined boat for which I have plans. I'm hoping to get a response from the current keepers of Berylla II about measuring that, too, since it also uses a Lea Francis engine, like the Whippet.

Leaking Boat! by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
NPJ, Dust isn't a problem until you come to refinishing. Do it all outside. I always spray outside and still do it up wind. Sprayed cellulose grey primer on my Crash Tender on Saturday and primer and off white enamel on my Chris Craft yesterday in a breeze, so stood upwind of it and all was well. Also rubbed down cellulose sanding sealer, dry. Dust just blew away. There's always a way round stuff. Cheers, Martin