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>> Home > Tags > enamel

enamel
enamel
HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Back to the build. Next milestone, to complete the superstructure and engine covers. The superstructure is essentially a cowl that supports the open bridge and serves as the air intake for the gas turbines. The engine covers fit into the rear of it. The superstructure is full of curves and will be interesting to make. Still trying to save weight, decided to make it out of glassfibre. Rather than first make a plug then a female mould and finally the cowl, wanted to try the technique of making a plug out of styrene foam sheet, then covering it in a glass fibre matt. Once the glass fibre is set, the foam is dissolved out using a solvent and the cowl remains – Inshallah! To ensure the foam did not react to the glass fibre resin, painted the finished cowl with enamel paint before sticking the matt down. See pictures. What a mess! The resin had crept under the paint and into the foam dissolving it. When the resin dried the plug had shrunk slightly and had the surface finish of a quarry. First thought was to hurl it and start again, this time in wood. On second thoughts, wondered if the plug could still be used. Decided to build it up with wood filler and from it make a female mould, as originally intended. The cowl would then be made from the mould. Built the damaged plug up and sanded it smooth. As the plug would be covered in fibreglass, the surface finish was not critical. Brushed a coat of fibreglass on the plug and, after drying filled any defects with glaze putty and sanded smooth. Once the finish and dimensions were satisfactory, applied a thicker coat of glass fibre to the plug. This was again smoothed down, waxed with carnauba polish and then covered in mould release. From it the cowl was made. Picture shows plug, mould and cowl placed side by each. The cowl requires reinforcement; the fittings and various mountings then adding before installing. A trial installation showed that it fitted properly the deck and was accurate. A lesson for the next time is to make the plug and mould much deeper than the finished item. That will allow any rough edges, on either the mould or the component, to be trimmed off leaving a smooth fibreglass edge.

'Maiami' ASR by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 5/10] 35"/1000g 'Maiami' ASR Capable of 5mph and a runtime of 60mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 25mm) Direct Drive to a 380 (3 Blade) Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) 2Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through China (5Amps) ESC - Comments: Knocked this up in around 6 weeks ('free modelling',-no plans, just looking at a few photos) for my son but he wasn't interested (the dreaded Playstation) so I re assigned it to myself and put a few more bits on it. The whole boat is balsa and just enamel painted so it is quite light. Only single shaft and runs well, but thinking of making it a twin set-up with better motors and shafts. mostly gets used as a camera boat as it is very stable.

Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc.... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Useful to know about Vanish. It certainly worked on my Star yacht sails. Fortunately the sails on the Ailsa yacht are lovely anyway, just some new rigging cord required. I would say the sails were the same as bed sheets. I used some white spirit to clean the deck on the Ailsa. Most of the dirt being handling muck. Then I waxed it with 3M wax...twice. It's wonderful stuff which I bought for our historic narrowboat's new paintwork. It was a wooden boat and when I replaced the cabins and had painted them with Tra-mar Coatings hand made enamel paint, I waxed them with 3M's wax and they went another 3 winters before I sold the boat, with the rain still rolling off in beads. The Ailsa is now waiting for some spar varnish over the repair's creamish paint. I couldn't match it perfectly, but I didn't want to repaint the whole hull. All the repairs are under the waterline so it shouldn't show. The Star...I never heard of them using aluminium for masts. How would they have kept the rigging eyes in place? Martin

Spray paints by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
If they are enamels like Plastikote used to be, yes, but as far as I know, Plastikote changed formulae to acrylic, which, if their brush pots were anything to go by are complete crap. I had one that reacted with itself! I complained bitterly to them and they sent me every pot of enamel they had left in the office! Martin

Kyosho Jetstream by Biscuit Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 9/10] 32" Kyosho Jetstream Single Propellor (2 Blade X Type 30mm) Geared to a Os 10 with pullstart (2 Blade X Type) - Comments: I restored this from a basket case, luckily the decals were in the box and never used, I reckon its from the late 1980s quite a collectible boat nowadays, runs lovely, has The optional trim tabs which it needs. I painted it with enamel paint then clear coat over the decals pretty model.

Transfers by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
If you wish to draw and colour transfers it can be done this way. Place the paper shiny side down and draw your design on the paper side An other one or two pieces of paper beneath will determine how raised the lines will become on the transfer side. Paint in between the raised lines using them as a reservoir for the paint. Enamel or cellulose can be used. A drop of Castor oil stirred into the celly will keep it from cracking when dry. When all dry use as normal and seal when in place. Not a good artist? It's amazing what you can do with a pencil and ruler and coins.👍 👍

Painting by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Ah! I thought Fairey might prove the exception to the planking rule. Well, it'll look nice, that's for sure. Paint. I always use enamel and my local auto paint shop will make me 1/4 litre tins up, of HMG, which lasts a long time from a small spray gun. Failing that, Rustoleum do some lovely rattle cans in a range of colours that spray very well and are only just over a fiver a tin. One tin would do you if you're careful. I've just given my Darby One Design its second coat of blue after a rub down and I'm happy with that. Dries very quickly, but is a nice gloss. It is a bit thin, so be very careful how you spray. Better to do two coats than one thick one. But really, if you can get it, HMG is the best bar none. Worth hunting for. Paint, alas, just ain't cheap anymore. Would that we could get tins of Valspar or Japlac, eh? The proper original stuff. Plastikote was a good paint when it was an enamel, now it's acrylic water based muck. No coverage and reacts with itself, let alone owt else. I would be inclined, btw, to do that curved deck in veneer, so all your mistakes will be made before it goes on the boat. In which case, once the planks are made and fit bang on, go up the edges with a black marker pen. It will look like caulking when all is done. Good luck, Martin

Painting by steve-d Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
Will post pics of the curved planking when I get in this evening but in the mean time any thoughts on the type of paint I should use on the hull? The subject boat is painted with International 'Toplac' but the smallest tin they do is 750ml (£22.95) so its not getting that. The model was painted with Humbrol enamel but it peeled so perhaps to be avoided.

Painting by steve-d Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
I have a Huntsman 31 model I am refurbishing. The paint is peeling off from age, the muppet who painted it only applied one coat (Me), the Humbrol enamel was probably too thick for the fine grain of the birch ply and spruce. I am planning to start with cellulose sanding sealer as it is nice and thin so should get a good key into the grain. So.. What paint should I use over the sealer? Some parts of the ply I want to look like teak deck planking so first I think I need a stain. Then line in the planks with fibre tip pen followed by what type of varnish? Some of the spruce needs to look like mahogany so do I stain it or use some sort of paint? Thanks Steve

Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc.... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Here's the yacht after the first coat of red enamel and the keel sprayed with self etch primer ready for the green later, but it's raining, dammit! Martin

Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc.... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
My wee red boat after a rub down and a file/sand on the steel keel. This morning I painted the red with HMG enamel and got the green mixed in the same make enamel by my wonderful chap at Kett's Auto Paints. The mast came in two parts, so I did a slight scarf and glued it. When the joint is well set, I'll make a splint and set it in prior to a rub down and a good waxing. The steel (tinplate) parts came with the predictable rust, but with my selection of scrapers and chisels made of broken and worn Swiss files I was able to scrape most of it off back to reasonable shiny steel. The out of shapeness needed only a clout with a cold chisel type of bodywork tool in the right places to restore it to original shape. Loops were filed to lose most of their rust, but not replaced. They'll be Vaselined as a form of anti rust, waterproofing. I have some new 1.3mm cord coming from Caldercraft. I just hope I can remember how it was rigged. I ain't great with knots. The sails were absolutely filthy with some sort of oil based grime, but my dear bride sorted them out with Vanish and a good hand wash. Pics of those tomorrow. I love this stuff.! Martin

Old outboard motor... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Doug, I do have a Hobbyking CNC ally one and now have a brushless inrunner for it. I got it when they were very cheap a while back. Wouldn't pay what they now want for them and Graupner are always way overpriced. I could be tempted with 7 quid for a Hobbies one though, just to see how it goes together. The K&O are gorgeous but collector money and the Alterscale are dummies, albeit nice dummies and also bloody expensive. I sliced the little vintage jobby I bought down the joint line with a fine saw blade in the minidrill today and all is well. It just needs new wires and some grease when I can find some good styrene/nylon grease. The motor is a two magnet Kako, many examples of which I have in store. Even has a nice little built in switch. I reckon 3 volts is probably all the transmission can take. The gears are not, as I assumed bevels, but 2 spur gears! I now have to find a way of making the prop shaft stay on the motor shaft! I'm loving this restoration stuff. Painted the red on my Star yacht today with my best chisel headed sable and got a special 1/4 litre of the emerald green mixed in HMG enamel (the very best there is). Tried to win a lovely Starlet off ebay, but some sod beat me to it last minute. I hope it leaks Martin

Styrene Allergy? by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Styrene fumes? You'll only get fumes if you heat it. My chum works a vac-former to make model car glazing and he thoroughly washes every sheet of PVC before forming it. Stops micro-bubbles forming. I use blue nitriles when epoxying. I always found latex melted on contact with most of the things I used, like enamel paint, Marineflex, etc. Nitriles stay put. Martin

Paints by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Hmm! Let's 'Cut to the chase'! First; I've never been on a ship, naval or civil, and I've been on a few during my 30 odd year career designing COMMS systems for ships, mostly naval, that used gloss paints OR matt paints. Matt paint, whether for scale or full size, rapidly shows the wear marks where folks tread or grab or where we habitually grab it on models. This rapidly creates a shiny effect, like the seat of your favourite, most comfortable and ancient trousers (which the Missus probably wanted to throw out years ago but you are fighting a REARguard action) 😁 During WW2 the emphasis was on reducing the reflectivity of paints on warships. Gloss on a ship / boat MAY not look any different from satin or matt at a distance BUT; it will reflect sunlight and flash which attracts attention and betrays the presence of the vessel. Furthermore gloss shows the wear and tear marks much sooner than satin. Whether matt paints were available or not in those days I don't know, but even if they were I don't think they would have been used after the initial durability tests on board. Having seen the paint part numbers, all BS381C xxx, specified on the Thornycroft 'blueprints' that Martin sent me, I would say that the paint colours you need Morkullen are RN Light Weatherworks grey BS381C 676 = Colour Coats M01 RN Dark Admiralty grey BS381C 632 = Colour Coats M16 RN Light Admiralty grey BS381C 697= Colour Coats M23 See page 3 of the colour chart, see attached colour charts from Sovereign Hobbies for their Colour Coats paints, which have been derived from original Admiralty paint chips.. Colour Coats are enamel. If you prefer acrylic try Life Colour set CS33 Royal Navy WW2 Set 1. See page 6 of attached Life Colour catalogue. Happy painting, don't forget to post pics / vids of the results👍 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS have a look at the recent HMS Campbeltown 1/96 thread for further detail of the recent discussion on WW2 RN paints. BTW; if I feel after painting that the finish is still too glossy I give it a blast of Lord Nelson satin, or in extreme cases, matt clear varnish. Otherwise I agree with Reilly's comments👍

Paints by reilly4 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
I use Satin enamels as they are more durable than Matt finishes, especially on the hulls, but still go over them with clear matt enamel for realism. The 'scale' appearance is the consideration. From a distance a real boat even if finished with a gloss marine enamel would not look glossy. A WW2 boat such as an MTB would definitely have a Matt finish, and always 2 coats. Working models get scuffed in use.