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>> Home > Tags > enamel

enamel
enamel
Chris-Craft Special Runabout by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
The first brushed coat of primer, rubbed down and another coat sprayed, so I'm not wasting time rubbing down brush strokes. A little filling with one shot putty and a final fine paper rub down and we'll be on with the red enamel for the bottom colour. Martin

Chris-Craft Special Runabout by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
OK, you know and I know that this is an Aerokits Sea Hornet, BUT, with a little reworking, it becomes a very passable Chris Craft Special (sometimes Custom) Runabout. One cockpit, long engine deck. I think it suits the Sea Hornet shape and proportions very well. Generally, I think too much is expected to be going on with a basic Hornet and the deck furniture is too simplistic. Also, don't be tempted to call this one a barrel back They had one continuous curve right over the transom from chine to chine, whereas this hull and the Special Runabout had a break, albeit a small one at the deck level. Anyway, I redecked the Hornet with 1/16th" ply, leaving the engine hatch long. I also had to make a small hatch at the stern to service the tiller and its connection. Then I realised I would never be able to get to the two starboard screws that hold the steering servo in, so a wee hatch went in over them too. That will be held in with a small magnet and just popped up from inside the engine 'ole hatch. Because the hull needed filling and various repairs, I decided to paint it, but veneer plank the deck. many Chris-Crafts were painted and I think this one in a nice off-white with a varnished Mahogany and pear deck will look just the job with nickel plated deck furniture, made in brass and nickel silver and plated in nickel to look like chrome in scale. Chrome is a) difficult to get these days and b) too bright and garish on a model. The hull has been epoxied and rubbed down then brush panted heavily with cellulose primer surfacer. This rubs down a treat ready for a sprayed enamel top coat or three. Cheers, Martin

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
Unless described as flat, paint was more often a brighter satin than matt and rarely actual gloss. White will always have been an off white as the components of paints were such that it was not possible to get a really bright white. I know that for a fact as my grandad always made his own and until PEP in the mid 60s (Plastic Emulsion Paint) there was no such thing as brilliant or appliance white. Unfortunately getting an decent off white is not easy these days since Plastikote went acrylic and their previously excellent paints started eating themselves on recoating. I now use enamels exclusively. They are densely pigmented, flexible and modern enamels dry pretty quickly. I am using a black enamel primer on my Crash Tender, which I will then spray with black "gloss" from the same range, which, once thinned with white spirit, will dry a little less than glossy. I still don't have a matt brick red for the undersides, but it can be made matt-ish with a careful rub down with 1000 grit wet and dry used wet and soapy, but be careful not to sand through, so very lightly does it, even 1000 grit can cut well when new. Decks were said to be Cerrux Light Deck Grey, anti-slip, which means a textured surface. That would be darker looking due to the surface texture's way with the light. The cabin sides were described as "smooth", i.e. same as the decks but not anti-slip. The roofs? Well, on Vosper's drawing "white" is crossed through and "Grey" written in. But, some pics do look white, the best pics look darker by a whisker than the sides and the roofs are clearly textured as they show evidence, as do the decks, of filth which will sit in the texture. You choose. NOBODY has yet given us chapter and verse. The fact is, an already very handsome boat looks so very pretty with white roofs. But they too should be off white if you can get it! Good luck. Fittings, btw can be had from SLEC in Watton in white metal. Basically the old Yeoman fittings, masters now owned by IP Engineering who bought them to cast when they owned Vintage Model Boat Company. Now they've sold that to SLEC, but I don't think SLEC have white metal casting facilities, so probably cast by Ivor still. I have just had a set for my birthday and they're excellent. They do need careful cleaning up as in mould lines need to be filed/scraped/sanded to a decent finish and then given good primered surface. No hook though, but it does include nav and riding lights. This site also has masts for sale in plastic, but I made my own in brass as I will the hook and davit. I have also just had a set of crew figures cast from my patterns and they will be available soon...a driver(Helm), a boss with binoculars and a lazy slob laying around in the after cockpit. Needs a roll-up to finish his look. No idea of price yet as don't know how much rubber to mould or resin to cast for a set. Yes, 1/16th scale. All this to finish a model I had 55 years ago! But I reckon it deserves it. Martin

Window Painting! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
So you'll be finished on the 29th ?? 😲 Just like Newport News - time and cost overruns 😁 3 coats sounds extravagant to me Ed. Humbrol enamel is pretty thick stuff. Matt covers better than gloss as well, 2 should be enough I think. Cheers, Doug 😎

54 year old Crash Tender by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Here's last night's first spray primer. I like this grey and will use it as the matt finish. Maybe then mask up and use the Baufix Grey for the cabin sides, with, OK, the Baufix white for the tops. I have black enamel primer for the hull and black enamel gloss. When you rub it down it's like soot! Martin

Crash Tender davit info... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
mturpin, if you would like to try contacting those organisations/people it would be wonderful. I would do it, but I'm in and out a lot lately and can't seem to settle to anything more than half an hour. So if you would take on that task there would be a lot of grateful people. I've even read recently that one such person claims the decks were bare and the cabin sides were a bluish shade! I painted my removable roofs today and I can see why people choose white! It would look a bit too grey, but that's going to be a purely aesthetic consideration. I have found a method of producing non-slip, using Chines five spice powder! Hate the stuff, but it goes onto some Lidl's coloured lacquer, available for 2 cans for a fiver(!!!) which is proving to be lovely resin rich enamel paint. I'm off back tommorrow to get some white, just in case. I have white cellulose, but can't use that over the enamel. The Baufix paint dries very quickly for an enamel with a lovely finish. I have some excellent matt varnish if needed. Please let us know how your enquiries go. Cheers, Martin

54 year old Crash Tender by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Boaty, it's amazing how many people HAD Taycol motors, but don't anymore, apart from our chum Doug in Munich. And I'll pick his brains later maybe for info on controlling the Taycol Supermarine in the Crash Tender. Then again, I might just set it off on one pack for slowish and switch in another for faster. I ain't into reverse. Boats don't go backuds. I've had enough real ones to know that! Two of those didn't have any gears. One had a clutch and the other didn't even have that. It starts, it goes, quickish! Always had a paddle handy in the Albatross! I'm not really into the boat club festivals of steering round stuff or backing into docks, so why trouble myself with ESCs which seem to fail often still and weren't around when I had the boat originally. I have gel cells, but the damned things have all gone dead on me, so I might see about Nimh packs when the time comes. I went to get some one shot cellulose putty to fill the cracks and grain bits and the old nail head dips. But my favourite auto paint shop said they hadn't sold it in ages and offered me some acrylic crap in a tube. Not a bloody chance!!! "Gimme the thickest brushing primer you got and it better be cellulose". Yeah, got that, he said. "So why ain't you got stopper?" No answer. Anyway I get this stuff home and it's thick, cellulose (skin forming after 3 minutes) and bang on the right shade of light grey for a Crash Tender. I shall experiment with my Chinchila dust next for the non-slip areas and mix a pot of the primer with a bit of white to do the cabin sides, when I finish spray. For the moment, I very quickly slapped it on with a brush and will leave it for today to harden then start a very big, dusty, rub down session tomorrow. OK a litre of primer ain't cheap, but it's cheaper from a car paint suppliers and it's bang on colour. It'll also do a LOT of boats! I have a black primer in enamel for Vanity, which will also go on the sides of the Crash tender, followed by black gloss enamel, but's a way down the road yet. Talking of old stuff boaty, the white enamel my dad insisted on painting the boat back in the early 60s is hard as rock! He used to get it by the 20 gallon can from a "mate on the docks". We had docks in those days. Dad called it ship enamel. We all knew what he meant. Our entire house was shades of pastel tinted ship enamel! Tints courtesy of another mate on the docks. He had a lot of mates on the docks. It was difficult to be a Cockney family and not have mates on the docks! Pics later of the slapped on grey primer, which, I should say, argued a bit with the sanding sealer. Nuffin' a good rub down won't sort out. Martin

Seaplane Tender 360 by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Bryan, If you want to do the SOE version she was most likely painted all matt black! The colour of skulduggery 😉 What ever you do, despite your good intentions to retain the 'old patina', judging by the photos you are in for a complete strip back and redo. Just as I have discovered with the PTB I bought. Thought it would just be a 'cosmetic job', flatten back and respray with Pacific green camouflage. Ho ho ho! Pics show what she currently looks like after cleaning off layers of enamel, and discovering that the prop shafts and rudders were misaligned and the chine strakes glued to the paint. 😡 Never mind an engine room fire when I tried to test the 'as bought' motor installation. 😭 Since those photos I have fitted new a new chine strake and started reinforcing the thin hull with glass fibre tissue. Next issue; set prop tubes properly and make an alu bracket to mount both the motors. Then set the rudder stocks correctly. Last thing I want is to dampen your enthusiasm, but that hull looks like it needs oodles of TLC. 🤔 Be aware of what's ahead of you and plan accordingly👍 Deck looks pretty neat, if unusual for a WW2 in service boat! As far as I can tell from the photos it's not just the cabin roof which is warped 😲 cabin and window frames will also need some attention by the looks of it. Before you run that motor I would strip it, clean all parts and check brushes and commutator for wear. See my Sea Scout blog 'Taycol Target motor' for a 'How to'. Should run well with a 3S LiPo, 11.1V. These boats weren't the fastest, 28 - 30 knots I believe. Which is why ST360 was reduced to more mundane duties after try outs by SOE. Don't forget some spark suppression!! Good luck, whatever you decide to do have fun doing it, Cheers Doug 😎

Crash Tender davit info... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Spray textured paint? I've seen it all now, but actually I recall seeing something along those lines in the newly opened Wicks in our nearest town, so I might return to have a butchers at their range. Failing that it'll be chinchilla dust sprinkled into grey enamel (slower drying) paint. And I think I might try the all grey, but different shades, just to be doggedly different. Cheers, Martin

Warped wood by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
OK, Doug, you just sold me on Lord Nelson spray varnish! Is it enamel? Obviously it's external capable, but I never heard of it. It would seem to have done your mahogany a treat! I have brush painted and rubbed down cellulose sanding sealer on all the woodwork on Vanity, but will need to varnish it all eventually and whilst I find brushing varnish with a fine sable an almost therapeutic activity, there's always the risk of it building up in internal corners which is almost impossible to shift. Cheers, Martin

Painting by Flack Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I have always used rattle cans from Halfords and or The Range. Beware of mixing different types of paints i.e. cellulose, acrylic and enamel. I have had a disaster with mixing paints that took weeks to strip the hull back to sort out.

Painting by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Most model boat hulls are way too big for an airbrush and in fact, even a spotting gun on a decent compressor can take a while with it's small spray pattern, but a rattler can ain't gonna last long on say a 30" hull. I'd say brush paint with a decent enamel, like HMG. Martin

Vanity, Victorian Cutter by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi all, a 1/16th scale model of the boat I used to live on at Burnham-on-Crouch. 1/8th" Cuban (yes really!) mahogany from 1920s chairs made by my cabinet maker Grandfather. Covered in J cloth and epoxy. J-cloth is very compliant, but yet very strong when soaked in epoxy (WEST System). Lightweight fillered for the bits where the saw wasn't as accurate ripping the strips as it might have been. Black enamel primer.

Sea Commander restoration tips by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Get yourself a small pack of epoxy resin from ebay and seek out all slight delaminations of the plywood frames. Get the epoxy in those split bits and clamp them up. A clothes peg is sufficient if you're short of space. You can put a piece of cling film twixt peg and wood so the peg doesn't stick. Then use the rest of the epoxy to waterproof the insides. Be thorough and methodical. If you sand the model back to wood, use epoxy on that, either through fine model aircraft fibreglass cloth or just squeegee epoxy on all over with an old credit card. It goes much further and gets forced into the grain. It's not necessary to use GRP cloth on everything if it's well built. I have several over-50 year old model boats that are perfectly water tight with decent paint jobs (enamel, of course). Cheers, Martin

Spray painting hulls. by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Ah, cellulose, of blessed memory. I still have some, come to think of it, but forgetfully, I bought black gloss enamel for Vanity and some enamel primer for it also in black First coat on today. But I will definitely experiment with spraying the final coats. I sprayed an old pre-War Marblehead with enamel and it went on well. You can still get cellulose if you can convince the dealer it's for your classic car. My son has a 1951 Renown so I could always quote all IT'S details to get it, but I don't think they'll post it and I'm nowhere near any suppliers geographically. I couldn't see the point in paying for epoxy tissue so I bought a huge bag of J cloths from Poundland and used that with epoxy. Slarred the epoxy on the mahogany hull (made from old chair legs my Grandad had made a dining suite with) and then laid the J-cloth on the tacky epoxy and slarred more on with an old credit card. All my credit cards are old now and a damned site more useful as epoxy squeegees than they ever were before. Got a few ridges where they overlapped, but filler sorted that out. The hull is still very light, so will need all the large lead weights on the end of a long fin keel (removable) as it carries a big rig, (see avatar). Good luck, Martin