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>> Home > Tags > epoxy resin

epoxy resin
aliphatic resin glue
resin
epoxy
z-poxy
epoxy resin
Sea Queen refurbishment by onetenor Commander   Posted: 20 days ago
Just a few quickies. first of all did the drill bit hit the bone? If so it needs an x -ray as there could be bone splinters that will cause pain even after the hole has healed. Re coating boat hulls try 2 part Epoxy paint / resins which can be used with cloth like polyester resin. RN I believe Acetone and various other solvents are available in quantity off the supermarket shelf in France👍. Do you get over the border at all? Not sure but I think the OP that said this mentioned ether too.

Denatured Alcohol by octman Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
When I have got the DNA and epoxy/polyester resin sorted out and I want to coat the inside of the boat, do I just do the hull, or should I wait until the deck is on? Chris

Denatured Alcohol by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Chris Always happy to share my experiences. Epoxy is basically a glue and whilst the aero boys like to use it with glass cloth to cover their wings because it bonds well to the wood and remains slightly flexible, my experience is it is dear, adds significantly to the weight, is difficult to apply evenly and has a nasty habit of running after application. We used on the large liners, having also seen the hype on U-Tube, and really struggled with the application. If I was using this as a sealing coat with or without cloth then I prefer Polyester lay up resin which is cheaper, thin and easy to apply, has controllable setting time and produces a much harder finish. Good luck with the registration, not sure I would want to get that close to HM Customs & Excise! Happy building Dave

Denatured Alcohol by octman Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
I am trying to get some of this stuff to dilute my epoxy resin with. I understand that it comes in many forms, including methylated spirits. Can anyone out there who knows these things advise me if they would all be suitable for thinning epoxy resin (Z Poxy Finishing Resin to be precise), or if there is a preferred version, and a source? If I used meths would the diluted resin be purple? Chris

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Might have, but it was pinned with brass pins as well, so will be sealing inside with epoxy resin, then coating the hull with eezicote and extra fine glass cloth before painting and vanishing. Well at least she's stripped for action. It must have taken years off her. (Maybe I should get the wife dipped)? Don't tell her.

Weathering by GrahamP74 Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Added the numbers and name yesterday and started the weathering process. Unlike my previous boat (Emily P) which was based on a steel hull I can't go crazy with the rusting! Fibre glass does however fade where water is consistently running so I have added some extra epoxy resin running down the sides from the scuppers and where the v doors, trawl and nets would rub. I have then used white gloss, brown fence paint and will add some green (for the slime!) This was applied with a cotton ear bud and then rubbed back with some string.

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Thanks for your feedback, I'm not trying to do a major rebuild just get the old Queen looking as good as possible, I think if it holds together after degreasing I'll paint the interior with epoxy resin to stabilize it. Then paint with hamerite smooth white to make it easier to keep clean. As for a motor I have a decoperm 6volt with gear box, or a Johnson 600 to choose from at present fitted with a 3 bladed 30mm brass prop. Also have the original 2 channel 27Mhz RX and tx. But not sure what to fit by way of speed control, I have an old variable sweep rheostat that works well. Wish I could upload pics it might help. Have a choice of 6volt SLA or 7.2volt nicads. I would like to keep to keep it as near to how dad could have used it in the late 50s early 60s. This project is more for family than me actually using it, just family history to pass on to my grandson. Thanks Colin

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Just started cleaning up my dads old Sea Queen. Spent four hours rubbing down hull (one half), as there is a bad layer of old fibre glass tape round the chine line. After cleaning back I found that the oil from inside had got into the joints. A lot of the nails had fallen out, so I have given a coat of epoxy , it now seems quite stable. Will do the same with the other side. The keel is delaminating so I will inject with epoxy and clamp. Hopefully she will hold together while I do the work so that I can coat the whole hull with extra fine glass cloth and resin. Will have to get more rapid set epoxy from pound shop tomorrow. That's all for now, goodnight all.

What type of wire? by nasraf Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
I am not sure from your original question if you were asking about sizing of conductors or on which type of conductor/insulation was the most suitable. The previous contributors have covered the size issue and here are a few thoughts on other features. From your comments it looked to me you were interested in having wiring in models you wanted to be around for a long time which is quite likely. I think my fireboat is over 50 years old now and is still stuck to gether with the original glue, but has had a number of up dates to its internals from very messy diesel to brushed dc motors. Most reasonably priced wiring is made from copper or tin coated copper wire if you need to do a lot of soldering, with pvc insulation, if pvc is irradiated this gives it a longer life. As far as I can see from my house wiring, so long as it is not flexed, ordinary pvc insulation lasts a long time, but does become brittle. In the defence/aerospace business since the second world war there have been various exotic systems used ( up until the end of the war rubber was the general insulator which did not last very long until it perished ). Various ones being silicone rubber internal insolators covered with glass fibre woven covers, this is horrible stuff to deal with when stripping, vynel with a woven nylon covering being another. With the advent of irradiated pvc and ptfe these were totally replaced. Ptfe is a very good insulator and is very stable and not attacked by any common liquids or solvents. Due to its good insulating properties the thickness of casing can be very thin, the problem with it is it is difficult to strip so you have to have a good pair of strippers. Another option in a model boat installation would be to use varnised copper wire like that used in various electrical items, solenoids, transformers etc. then stick this down on to a bed of epoxy resin and then add an extra coat, a bit like a fitted p.c.b. I have never done it but if it was well done could look quite interesting. If the radio side is a major consideration the above is not very applicable as, as has been said by others the choice is largely decided by the equipment you acquire.

Finishing by Westquay Captain   Posted: 4 months ago
That's why I counselled caution with anything over acrylic...including, as it happens, acrylic. HRG enamels take a very short time to dry. In fact so much so that they sell a decelerator to slow drying time to maintain a wet edge. Very important when you're painting a narrow boat by hand, although a lot of people then use Owatrol mixed in with the enamel. I sprayed HRG enamel, thinned with white spirit and I sprayed all the parts of a kit car with it. It dried the same afternoon and was handleable the next day with ease. Needless to say it glossed beautifully, being enamel. Spray cans can be OK, but are very expensive for what they re and NEVER use over acrylic as they will wrinkle. What goes in those cans ain't pure water based acrylic, trust me. For one thing, it stinks a fair bit. I've painted enough slot car bodies to know that and what Halfords mix for you is pure, stinks-of-peardrops cellulose, whatever they might tell you. None of them know a fraction of we old painty farts know! If you can afford them, I would recommend Zero paints. They're formulated to be airbrush ready, need no thinning and are to quote the man that makes them, "cellulose only different". I did a 3 foot model narrow boat for somebody and they went on beautifully out of my Paasche Model H single mix airbrush (all you need). In fact I have also used them from my spotting gun (cheap as chips and easy to clean, IF you have a compressor). Zeros mask well too. Problem is he won't post and wants a fortune for courier. I won't play that game when I just had 2 deliveries of epoxy resin through the post. I have recently used Tamiya spray cans that were given to me (yes I really AM that tight) and they are excellent, but then, they really are cellulose. I wish I could buy cellulose, but it allegedly isn't made these days...Hmmmm. Something ending in "...ocks" comes to mind. I'd honestly stick to enamels bought from a car paint suppliers. Their wet'n'dry is cheaper too. Always talk to the organ grinder himself, never his monkey, hence auto refinishers' suppliers. Martin

Waterproof glue by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Hi Chris. Like yours, my very first wooden boat was held together with Cascamite. I'm very happy to recommend Titebond 2, it's an aliphatic resin that's waterproof, dries very quickly and forms a very strong bond on wood to wood joints. I have used it extensively in the construction of my crash tender project. The other glue I have used is Z-poxy 30 minute epoxy resin, great for wood to metal and various other materials. I hope that is helpful. Rob.

Fiberglassing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi chugalone 100 Welcome to the site. You can fibreglass with different types of resin and cloth. If you are making and casting a fibreglass hull use fibreglass matting but to cover a hull lightweight fibreglass cloth is best. This is the type shown in the suggested video. Resin can be epoxy or polyester based but the latter is generally cheaper and in my opinion is easier to use and doesn't require thinning with alcohol. It is sold as layup resin and is supplied with hardener. Do follow the instructions re quantity of each part and mix thoroughly. If you are using epoxy Iso Propyl Alcohol is the type to use and is clear. The video shows using a brush to apply the resin and whilst this is OK it will give a very thick and heavy coating. I use the brush to apply and then a credit card sized piece of plasticard to spread the resin over and into the surface of the cloth resulting in an almost opaque finish with the weave showing through. You do need to have a good surface to work with as any imperfections will show when the resin hardens. Once dry give a light sanding all over to remove any imperfections and fill any holes with car body filler and sand smooth. I then apply a very thin top coat of the resin using a brush. When dry use wet and dry to sand and if necessary apply further thin coats until you have the finish you require. I have a local supplier and if you visit the site http://www.resin-supplies.co.uk/product.htm all the resins/cloths etc are listed. Using Google should bring up a local supplier. you do need to follow the safety instructions to protect yourself and wear appropriate protection for your hands, eyes and breathing, it is also best to apply in a well ventilated area and not on a cold day. The end result will be well worth the effort to keep your tug waterproof. You could also paint the resin over thye inside of the hull to protect the wood from any water that doeos find its way inside. Dave

To resin cover or not my ulises steam tug by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Hi Mate, welcome to the forum, First of all there is no such thing as newby question, only what you dont know or are uncertain. I would always resin cover the hull, added strength etc, less chance of dings. But, glass cloth or borrow the wifes tights!!! all good for the hull, Resin I have used polyester resin in the past but i now use epoxy layup resin, comes with different time hardeners, or the resin from delux, cant remember the name is water based, (very little smell) I would also pore resin inside the hull as a sealant (between bulkheads and roll the hull around to spread the resin over your planking, also great as you mention its a steam tug so oil etc wont affect the hull. Finish is down to detail sanding and filling, if its smooth to start with it will be far easier to get a smooth finish. Hope this has given you some guidance, shout again if you need more. PS. If your looking for a club, have a look at Etherow MBC we are in Romiley, just out of Stockport Regards Mark

water proofing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Hi Colin The Billing plank on frame models are from an earlier era and were very popular in their day. My first model was their Mercantic. I used Cascamite glue which worked fine for about 20 years but then the wood cracked along the glue lines😡. The solution depends on the hull finish you seek to acquire. If you want a bare wood finish then you need to fit and glue the planks very carefully so that the joins look correct. You then need to seal the inside with a thin coat of resin run all over the inside right up to the bulwark. For best results you can use tissue, glass fibre or cloth cut to fit between the formers. Just make sure you stipple the resin into the cloth and try to avoid any bubbles. If your hull will be painted then, after final preparation, you can cover in a similar way as described above. You then rub down and fill any imperfections with Body filler. I usually also do the inside also to protect the internal wood from any water ingress. When I built the Olympic and Titanic with my friend Bill we used this method. I have attached a few pics showing the stages. We built from plans with ply frmes and 4mm balsa sheet. The outside is covered with glass cloth and epoxy resin whilst the inside is covered with Fiberglass cloth and poly layup resin. We took many pics and I have them on my Dropbox account. If you send me a private message with your email address I will share. Its free to join and you can view on line and download as many as you want. Have fun Dave

Covering hull by manyboats Lieutenant   Posted: 8 months ago
To get the nice reverse curve in the bows, large blocks of balsa were used; luckily got given plenty of them years ago. I did use the thin ply supplied for the hull skin as replacing it is expensive, just recut to suit. After carving the bow shape and sanding everything true I covered the hull with fine woven glass cloth, after coating the hull with spray adhesive and letting it get tacky. After 2 coats of epoxy resin and lots of wet sanding, time to fit the rudder tube and prop shaft (with 3d printed oiler) and motor mounts, then the inside was sealed with epoxy.