Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
October 2017: 7 people
September 2017: 15 people
August 2017: 10 people
July 2017: 16 people
June 2017: 8 people
May 2017: 8 people
April 2017: 23 people
March 2017: 9 people
February 2017: 4 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (21)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > epoxy resin

epoxy resin
aliphatic resin glue
resin
epoxy
z-poxy
epoxy resin
MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
As the stern needed the most reshaping, decided to tackle it first. Made up a wooden insert to reflect the correct deck stern contour and glued it in between the deck supports. This would give the stern be the correct shape and length. Once that was positioned pulled the hull up tight to the supports. As the stern is approached the sharper profile of the Teakwood requires the hull sides to be pulled firmly inwards and the transom be vertical. Decided this was not going to epoxy and stay in place satisfactorily once the strain was released, so cut a series of vertical slots in the rear hull to allow it relax and squeeze it together. One slot has to be quite deep, otherwise the lower hull will crack as it will not relax sufficiently. Used the Dremel cutting disc for this. The slots need to be quite generous as the the hull has to be pulled in some distance. Once this was all epoxied in place, wrapped “cling film” around the rear of the hull and poured liquid fibreglass resin around the slots and under the insert to bond everything together. Worked this onto all the vertical and horizontal surfaces as it set. The stern is now good and rigid. The attached pictures show the new stern profile and slots. The first pictures are “as is” to illustrate the process. Further work was also needed to true up the bulwarks and disguise the slots. This mutilation may seem a brutal way of getting the hull shape correct, but had tried all kinds of pulling and squeezing of the hull, none of which held in place after the clamps were released. Once the cosmetic aspects of the stern rework were complete, established the correct location for the rudder post and fitted it. The major stern work is now finished.

Crash Tender Shaft Tube Poistion by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
Hi Dave, agree with the talc idea, sometimes I file a piece of busted terracotta flower pot to powder and mix that with the resin. But usually to repair Gisela's busted garden ornaments not for boat models, but no reason why not😉 But then that's why I suggested the thicker two part glue not the liquid resin for this 'fix'. Re hardeners: as far as I know all are peroxide based but the concentration is different for the various 'speed' glues. Frankly I would have thought that the faster mix on the inside would have accelerated the outer mix, at least at the interface between the two! BTW: It was never suggested to use the epoxy as filler! The resin was just to soak and harden the balsa wedges and hold everything in place. I'm sure I wrote to the effect; when fully cured THEN use filler on the outside of the hull for the cosmetics. Something lost in interpretation?? Anyway step by step Neil is reaching his goal! 👍 @ Neil; you'll need to get a shift on with the 5 min mix! 5 mins is the hard setting time, working time before it goes too stiff to move is only about 2mins!!!🤔 Cheers Doug 😎

Deck in! by Skydive130 Lieutenant   Posted: 21 days ago
After a week away in Lanzarote, have had a couple of days to get some work done. Left side of hull is now fully sheeted, gaps filled and awaiting final sanding and glass clothing. Decided to get ahead of myself and have fitted all the deck pieces and the cabin deck formers. The inside of the hull has had a second coat of epoxy resin and will get a couple of coats of yaht varnish once the final pieces of internal wood parts have been fitted to include battery tray, motor mounts, prop shafts, servo rail, ESC tray, receiver tray, speaker/engine sound module tray. Up at the bow have fitted the wood for the on/off switch, sanded, sealed and primed the bow deck before adding a couple of the detail parts.

Glazing help by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Doug I used a trader (Steve Tranter- Model Boat Bits) to get the waterjet cutting done. The machine needs programming and I provided a spread sheet with the dimensions and they produced the file and did the cutting. As we were building two large models this was the only way we could get the project finished on time. I have been experimenting with crystal clear resin to produce portholes for a Confiance Class tug I am building. I made portholes out of brass on the lathe then filled the centre with the clear casting resin. I had bubbles in the initial attempt but by using a syringe and flicking the tube the bubbles all go to the top of the syringe and the result is to my liking. I do paint the portholes first. When dry I just glue in the fibreglass hull with epoxy. Mine are near the waterline and whilst cyano would work I don't trust it when wet as experienced with the Olympic. You could drill and fill your portholes with this, just need to place a blanking plate behind each porthole til the clear casting resin sets. I suspect this would be quicker than using acetate. Incidentally I used to cut my acetate portholes with a heated brass tube. I used a piece of stainless rod inside the tube to push the portholes out. Cheers Dave

Sea Queen refurbishment by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Just a few quickies. first of all did the drill bit hit the bone? If so it needs an x -ray as there could be bone splinters that will cause pain even after the hole has healed. Re coating boat hulls try 2 part Epoxy paint / resins which can be used with cloth like polyester resin. RN I believe Acetone and various other solvents are available in quantity off the supermarket shelf in France👍. Do you get over the border at all? Not sure but I think the OP that said this mentioned ether too.

Denatured Alcohol by octman Captain   Posted: 3 months ago
When I have got the DNA and epoxy/polyester resin sorted out and I want to coat the inside of the boat, do I just do the hull, or should I wait until the deck is on? Chris

Denatured Alcohol by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Chris Always happy to share my experiences. Epoxy is basically a glue and whilst the aero boys like to use it with glass cloth to cover their wings because it bonds well to the wood and remains slightly flexible, my experience is it is dear, adds significantly to the weight, is difficult to apply evenly and has a nasty habit of running after application. We used on the large liners, having also seen the hype on U-Tube, and really struggled with the application. If I was using this as a sealing coat with or without cloth then I prefer Polyester lay up resin which is cheaper, thin and easy to apply, has controllable setting time and produces a much harder finish. Good luck with the registration, not sure I would want to get that close to HM Customs & Excise! Happy building Dave

Denatured Alcohol by octman Captain   Posted: 3 months ago
I am trying to get some of this stuff to dilute my epoxy resin with. I understand that it comes in many forms, including methylated spirits. Can anyone out there who knows these things advise me if they would all be suitable for thinning epoxy resin (Z Poxy Finishing Resin to be precise), or if there is a preferred version, and a source? If I used meths would the diluted resin be purple? Chris

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Might have, but it was pinned with brass pins as well, so will be sealing inside with epoxy resin, then coating the hull with eezicote and extra fine glass cloth before painting and vanishing. Well at least she's stripped for action. It must have taken years off her. (Maybe I should get the wife dipped)? Don't tell her.

Weathering by GrahamP74 Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
Added the numbers and name yesterday and started the weathering process. Unlike my previous boat (Emily P) which was based on a steel hull I can't go crazy with the rusting! Fibre glass does however fade where water is consistently running so I have added some extra epoxy resin running down the sides from the scuppers and where the v doors, trawl and nets would rub. I have then used white gloss, brown fence paint and will add some green (for the slime!) This was applied with a cotton ear bud and then rubbed back with some string.

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Thanks for your feedback, I'm not trying to do a major rebuild just get the old Queen looking as good as possible, I think if it holds together after degreasing I'll paint the interior with epoxy resin to stabilize it. Then paint with hamerite smooth white to make it easier to keep clean. As for a motor I have a decoperm 6volt with gear box, or a Johnson 600 to choose from at present fitted with a 3 bladed 30mm brass prop. Also have the original 2 channel 27Mhz RX and tx. But not sure what to fit by way of speed control, I have an old variable sweep rheostat that works well. Wish I could upload pics it might help. Have a choice of 6volt SLA or 7.2volt nicads. I would like to keep to keep it as near to how dad could have used it in the late 50s early 60s. This project is more for family than me actually using it, just family history to pass on to my grandson. Thanks Colin

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Just started cleaning up my dads old Sea Queen. Spent four hours rubbing down hull (one half), as there is a bad layer of old fibre glass tape round the chine line. After cleaning back I found that the oil from inside had got into the joints. A lot of the nails had fallen out, so I have given a coat of epoxy , it now seems quite stable. Will do the same with the other side. The keel is delaminating so I will inject with epoxy and clamp. Hopefully she will hold together while I do the work so that I can coat the whole hull with extra fine glass cloth and resin. Will have to get more rapid set epoxy from pound shop tomorrow. That's all for now, goodnight all.

What type of wire? by nasraf Commander   Posted: 6 months ago
I am not sure from your original question if you were asking about sizing of conductors or on which type of conductor/insulation was the most suitable. The previous contributors have covered the size issue and here are a few thoughts on other features. From your comments it looked to me you were interested in having wiring in models you wanted to be around for a long time which is quite likely. I think my fireboat is over 50 years old now and is still stuck to gether with the original glue, but has had a number of up dates to its internals from very messy diesel to brushed dc motors. Most reasonably priced wiring is made from copper or tin coated copper wire if you need to do a lot of soldering, with pvc insulation, if pvc is irradiated this gives it a longer life. As far as I can see from my house wiring, so long as it is not flexed, ordinary pvc insulation lasts a long time, but does become brittle. In the defence/aerospace business since the second world war there have been various exotic systems used ( up until the end of the war rubber was the general insulator which did not last very long until it perished ). Various ones being silicone rubber internal insolators covered with glass fibre woven covers, this is horrible stuff to deal with when stripping, vynel with a woven nylon covering being another. With the advent of irradiated pvc and ptfe these were totally replaced. Ptfe is a very good insulator and is very stable and not attacked by any common liquids or solvents. Due to its good insulating properties the thickness of casing can be very thin, the problem with it is it is difficult to strip so you have to have a good pair of strippers. Another option in a model boat installation would be to use varnised copper wire like that used in various electrical items, solenoids, transformers etc. then stick this down on to a bed of epoxy resin and then add an extra coat, a bit like a fitted p.c.b. I have never done it but if it was well done could look quite interesting. If the radio side is a major consideration the above is not very applicable as, as has been said by others the choice is largely decided by the equipment you acquire.

Finishing by Westquay Captain   Posted: 6 months ago
That's why I counselled caution with anything over acrylic...including, as it happens, acrylic. HRG enamels take a very short time to dry. In fact so much so that they sell a decelerator to slow drying time to maintain a wet edge. Very important when you're painting a narrow boat by hand, although a lot of people then use Owatrol mixed in with the enamel. I sprayed HRG enamel, thinned with white spirit and I sprayed all the parts of a kit car with it. It dried the same afternoon and was handleable the next day with ease. Needless to say it glossed beautifully, being enamel. Spray cans can be OK, but are very expensive for what they re and NEVER use over acrylic as they will wrinkle. What goes in those cans ain't pure water based acrylic, trust me. For one thing, it stinks a fair bit. I've painted enough slot car bodies to know that and what Halfords mix for you is pure, stinks-of-peardrops cellulose, whatever they might tell you. None of them know a fraction of we old painty farts know! If you can afford them, I would recommend Zero paints. They're formulated to be airbrush ready, need no thinning and are to quote the man that makes them, "cellulose only different". I did a 3 foot model narrow boat for somebody and they went on beautifully out of my Paasche Model H single mix airbrush (all you need). In fact I have also used them from my spotting gun (cheap as chips and easy to clean, IF you have a compressor). Zeros mask well too. Problem is he won't post and wants a fortune for courier. I won't play that game when I just had 2 deliveries of epoxy resin through the post. I have recently used Tamiya spray cans that were given to me (yes I really AM that tight) and they are excellent, but then, they really are cellulose. I wish I could buy cellulose, but it allegedly isn't made these days...Hmmmm. Something ending in "...ocks" comes to mind. I'd honestly stick to enamels bought from a car paint suppliers. Their wet'n'dry is cheaper too. Always talk to the organ grinder himself, never his monkey, hence auto refinishers' suppliers. Martin

Waterproof glue by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Hi Chris. Like yours, my very first wooden boat was held together with Cascamite. I'm very happy to recommend Titebond 2, it's an aliphatic resin that's waterproof, dries very quickly and forms a very strong bond on wood to wood joints. I have used it extensively in the construction of my crash tender project. The other glue I have used is Z-poxy 30 minute epoxy resin, great for wood to metal and various other materials. I hope that is helpful. Rob.