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>> Home > Tags > epoxy

epoxy
epoxy resin
epoxy
Glue guns by ronrees Petty Officer   Posted: 8 days ago
I have a lot of experience with Glue Guns having taught Technology in schools for 30 years +. There are two main types of glue stick-Hot melt and Low melt (for safer use). The hot glue will stick skin with often devastating results!!. I also build theatrical props and it is very useful for building all sorts of things and will stick most things well. ie wood, metal, plastics (which it can effect) glass, clothing, felt, straw, string, rubber and many many more, but they are all quick fixes and can come apart with constant use and vibration especially on shiny surfaces. In models I tend to use the stuff to hold cables in place and tack things in position quickly to align them before finally gluing with Epoxy. Motors can be be held in place with Hot Glue and the advantages are it makes a good sound insulator and can be repositioned for a few minutes before it goes cool. Also it can be prised off again if you need to change the motor. I would not not recommend it as a permanent fix on many model things and certainly not as a structural adhesive, fittings etc. will almost certainly fall off eventually. If you regard it as a third hand you'll find it a useful addition to your gluing arsenal. Happy boating......Ron.

First post... by BOATSHED Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 9 days ago
I don't know if it help you but this is a very good glue. You don't have to mix it like epoxy glue's. It is waterproof I was recommended it for a boat build and found it to be fine. I have used all sorts in the past dating back to the 60's. Cascamite, epoxy, even with my dad as a child we used the good old fashion smelly glue bead's. I still use them here and there. But we all have different idea's. Hope this helps.

First post... by Midlife306 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 9 days ago
Cheers John👍 I'll be cutting out the inside of all the bulkheads next & then I'll glue the structure together, I'm planning on using epoxy but if anyone has any suggestions of a better glue I'm all ears. I'm going to make the spars out of 1mm thick titanium, I'll get the bits laser cut by a mate & I know a very good welder, I just need to draw them up first... Cheers Wayne

stripping hull for repair and repaint by octman Lieutenant   Posted: 20 days ago
Thanks Dave, I applied my Black and Decker mouse detail sander to the hull, using only the weight of the sander. Turns out it has been epoxy coated, I have removed sufficient paint to see what is underneath it and there are 2 small areas where the wood is black and nasty. One consists of a few spots about half way between the bow and the stern, and mid way between the keel and the joint with the side skin, and the other is a line about 3 inches long and quarter inch wide running alongside the keel. The keel also seems to be poor on that side as well. What I really would like is a copy of the plans, so that I can see what I am dealing with. Nothing on E Bay! At the moment anyway. Chris

Fiberglassing by Delboy Apprentice   Posted: 22 days ago
I find Eze-Kote from Deluxe materials a much better material to work with than epoxy or polyester. It's a water-based resin which provides a waterproof and fuel-proof finish. you may need three or four coats but that's not a chore as it's easy to apply, there's no wastage as the pot never 'goes-off' and it's dry to a paint-able surface in half an hour. You clean up with water as well.

Cockpit deck brass features. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 23 days ago
The aft cockpit deck has two drain holes on the real boat that discharge through a pair of outlets on the transom if the boat takes on any water in the cockpit well. On my model the drains are not connected to the outlets, that’s taking the scale accuracy a bit too far 😜, nevertheless I don’t want a couple of holes in my deck letting in water so I need to fill them in with some drain gratings. I made these from some 10mm thick wall brass tubing and some 2mm brass rod. First I filed three narrow slots into the end of the brass tube about half the thickness of the brass rod and soft soldered them into the slots. The rod was then filed flush to the top of the tube to flatten the profile and form the grating slots, and the overhang filed flush with the tube sides. I used a pipe cutter to separate the finished piece from the brass tube and then repeated the process for the second fitting. The grating needs to be blocked so that It doesn’t let water through and I did this by forming a disc out of black plasticard the same diameter as the tube bore as a stopper and filling the base with epoxy to form the seal, the finished drains were then glued into the deck panel flush with the planking. I used some 1.5mm brass rod bent and fashioned to form the handles for the hatches and these were fixed with epoxy through holes in the panel. Another brass feature on the deck are the rivets around the battery hatch, these are actually some domed rivets with a 2mm head and 1mm shaft that I bought online from RB Models (Poland) along with some other excellent items from their range of ships fittings. www.rbmodel.com Finally the deck panel and main hatch cover were sprayed with several coats of satin lacquer. The panel will need some further work to incorporate the towing hook stays and I’ll cover that in another posting.

Deck fittings, portholes and a door knob ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
Now that the painting is finished I can start putting on some of the white metal deck fittings. I had previously cleaned these up with a file and wire wool and sprayed them all with etch primer, some were drilled to take threaded studs to fix them through the deck or as a reinforcement for epoxy glue fixing into the deck, and some pierced to take a short fixing pin. The chain pipe was drilled out to make it look more realistic. They were all brush painted with some Tamiya metallic acrylic paint, I chose ‘gun metal’ for this as I want to paint some other fittings and window frames with a metallic silver finish as a contrast. The portholes were painted with the same colour as the cabin sides and glazed with the perspex that was supplied with the kit, 'canopy glue' was used for this as I read that cyano glue would 'mist' the plastic. Another small detail I thought to add was a brass knob for the cabin door, this was hand turned from some brass rod and drilled out to take a 2mm threaded stud for fixing through the door. A nice little finishing detail I think, and I'm quite enjoying working with brass 😁

SHERSCHEN P206 by Inkoust Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Wooden structure submarine chasers of 70 years in service with Russia and East Germany. Cover with balsa and smeared with epoxy varnish. The model is equipped with two engines of 600 pcs, 2 pcs NiCd battery 3000 mA

Fiberglassing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi chugalone 100 Welcome to the site. You can fibreglass with different types of resin and cloth. If you are making and casting a fibreglass hull use fibreglass matting but to cover a hull lightweight fibreglass cloth is best. This is the type shown in the suggested video. Resin can be epoxy or polyester based but the latter is generally cheaper and in my opinion is easier to use and doesn't require thinning with alcohol. It is sold as layup resin and is supplied with hardener. Do follow the instructions re quantity of each part and mix thoroughly. If you are using epoxy Iso Propyl Alcohol is the type to use and is clear. The video shows using a brush to apply the resin and whilst this is OK it will give a very thick and heavy coating. I use the brush to apply and then a credit card sized piece of plasticard to spread the resin over and into the surface of the cloth resulting in an almost opaque finish with the weave showing through. You do need to have a good surface to work with as any imperfections will show when the resin hardens. Once dry give a light sanding all over to remove any imperfections and fill any holes with car body filler and sand smooth. I then apply a very thin top coat of the resin using a brush. When dry use wet and dry to sand and if necessary apply further thin coats until you have the finish you require. I have a local supplier and if you visit the site http://www.resin-supplies.co.u k/product.htm all the resins/cloths etc are listed. Using Google should bring up a local supplier. you do need to follow the safety instructions to protect yourself and wear appropriate protection for your hands, eyes and breathing, it is also best to apply in a well ventilated area and not on a cold day. The end result will be well worth the effort to keep your tug waterproof. You could also paint the resin over thye inside of the hull to protect the wood from any water that doeos find its way inside. Dave

Falcon 2 FSR Endurance Racer by andycoburn Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
The hull was bought from Modell Marin in Sweden owned by Fredde Cederberg, the current Naviga European Champion. It is an ultra-light Carbon/Kevlar/Epoxy composite.

Wheel assembled by Trillium Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
The paddles were cut from 0.050” styrene, the attachment points for the support arms drilled, and the support arms fitted and glued in with epoxy. The paddles and the side wheel assembly were painted black, with small pieces of masking tape over the pivot holes in the paddle support arms, where the pivot tubes were glued to them, and painted over later. When it came to assembling the parts, the sequence was as follows: - Fastened one end of the links to the inside face of the master rod (looks like a banjo); using #2-56 UNC bolts with the bolt heads on the outside face, a 4.5mm length of 1/8” brass tube as a bushing, and two #4 washers, and a #2-56 nyloc nut. - Inserted a #4-40 UNC bolt and washer in the centre of the master rod from the inside, secured it with a 5/32” brass tube bushing, lock washer and nut - Fastened the outer end of the links to the paddle arms, with the links on the outside of the paddle arms, with the bolt heads on the inside face, otherwise same as inner end of the links. The next step is to make the support for the pivot of the feathering mechanism.

Part 2. The searchlight optics. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
The reflector that I originally used for testing came from Maplins and was not a particularly good fit and it also produced a broad diffused light, but I found another lens from the same supplier that could be adapted to fit and would produce a much narrower 10° beam. The lens body was too long to fit into the searchlight body so I 'ground down' the lens on some abrasive to a size that would fit using progressively finer grades of wet & dry paper. The lens was then polished with some cutting/polishing compound to restore the optical clarity.🤓 The original and modified lenses are shown in the 'photos. The lens now fits perfectly into the searchlight body and produces a much narrower and focussed beam of light. I cut and shaped a piece of 1mm clear perspex to form a protective cover over the lens to hold it in the searchlight body and make it waterproof. The searchlight on the real boat has a 'tri-form’ protective cage with a centre boss (my description, there’s probably a proper name for it ), this part is not supplied in the white metal kit so I constructed one from some 22mm copper plumbing pipe, some brass pins and a hand turned and drilled brass rod for the centre boss. These parts were ‘soft soldered’ together as silver soldering would be quite difficult because of the different heat gradients. Before final assembly I will paint the parts gloss grey and secure the optical and protective lens with some canopy glue which will form a flexible seal and won’t ’fog’ the lens as superglue would, and then epoxy the 'tri-form' cage to the front. Hopefully the end result will be well worth the effort and do justice to my brother’s lathe skills!😎

Making the searchlight. Part one. The metalwork. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Having decided to make the searchlight a working feature I needed to make a sturdier base for it as the supplied white metal item is far too weak and not up to the job. This is another job for the man with the lathe......😜 I want the new piece to replicate the original as much as possible so I took measurements of the white metal part and produced a dimensional drawing which I e-mailed to my brother. A short while later the item arrived in the post with another as a spare in case I messed up the first! 😓 I annealed some ‘D’ profile brass rod and formed it to the dimensions of the original cradle and set this into a slot filed into the top of the turned searchlight base. Before silver soldering the cradle into place I spun the part in a drill and rounded off the base with some abrasive to a profile more like the original. I also filed flats at the cradle ends and drilled them, and the searchlight body, to accept some 2mm brass screws to join the two parts together. The base has a 2mm diameter hole bored through to accept the drive shaft from the servo and a very small grub screw secures the base onto this shaft. The 3 watt LED is already epoxy into the searchlight body but I will replace the wire with something thinner and bring it out through the back in some heat shrink tubing. I'm hoping that this will be flexible enough to allow free rotation of the searchlight.😊

To resin cover or not my ulises steam tug by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Mate, welcome to the forum, First of all there is no such thing as newby question, only what you dont know or are uncertain. I would always resin cover the hull, added strength etc, less chance of dings. But, glass cloth or borrow the wifes tights!!! all good for the hull, Resin I have used polyester resin in the past but i now use epoxy layup resin, comes with different time hardeners, or the resin from delux, cant remember the name is water based, (very little smell) I would also pore resin inside the hull as a sealant (between bulkheads and roll the hull around to spread the resin over your planking, also great as you mention its a steam tug so oil etc wont affect the hull. Finish is down to detail sanding and filling, if its smooth to start with it will be far easier to get a smooth finish. Hope this has given you some guidance, shout again if you need more. PS. If your looking for a club, have a look at Etherow MBC we are in Romiley, just out of Stockport Regards Mark

To resin cover or not my ulises steam tug by Rochdaleblue Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi guys sorry if this is a newbie question but is it better to cover and epoxy my plank and frame hull or can I do as the instructions say and just seal fill and paint. Is the resin coating the only way to gets it really smooth.