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>> Home > Tags > epoxy

epoxy
epoxy resin
epoxy
MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
As the stern needed the most reshaping, decided to tackle it first. Made up a wooden insert to reflect the correct deck stern contour and glued it in between the deck supports. This would give the stern be the correct shape and length. Once that was positioned pulled the hull up tight to the supports. As the stern is approached the sharper profile of the Teakwood requires the hull sides to be pulled firmly inwards and the transom be vertical. Decided this was not going to epoxy and stay in place satisfactorily once the strain was released, so cut a series of vertical slots in the rear hull to allow it relax and squeeze it together. One slot has to be quite deep, otherwise the lower hull will crack as it will not relax sufficiently. Used the Dremel cutting disc for this. The slots need to be quite generous as the the hull has to be pulled in some distance. Once this was all epoxied in place, wrapped “cling film” around the rear of the hull and poured liquid fibreglass resin around the slots and under the insert to bond everything together. Worked this onto all the vertical and horizontal surfaces as it set. The stern is now good and rigid. The attached pictures show the new stern profile and slots. The first pictures are “as is” to illustrate the process. Further work was also needed to true up the bulwarks and disguise the slots. This mutilation may seem a brutal way of getting the hull shape correct, but had tried all kinds of pulling and squeezing of the hull, none of which held in place after the clamps were released. Once the cosmetic aspects of the stern rework were complete, established the correct location for the rudder post and fitted it. The major stern work is now finished.

Hull prep completed by GARTH Commander   Posted: 5 days ago
Had a little time & the weather was great so worked outside putting the hull skins on I used Door skin mahogany .A sheet was about $ 9.00 Canadian Next time I use Oak Door skin That's about $23.00 a sheet . Have to now take my time & smooth all the parts .I also sealed the inside of hull with a 2 part finishing epoxy.

Varnish by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
Hi Alan, the International Everdure 2 part epoxy paint is superb, expensive but applied as the instructions it gives a fantastic finish your Riva will look better than the real thing Mark

Fairplay V (Hegi) rebuild / refit by Radiosailor Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 9 days ago
Today my Fleabay find arrived in a big box: O dear... ...Nothing wrong with the new hull, paperwork consists of some printed scans with the main drawing in just A3 format. That drawing doen't show any measurements, but partnumbers. The superstructure and wheelhouse are... well, they show 'some' patina. (cough) Since there are no other drawings of the used parts everything must be expanded to the correct size, and then made/build. Thinking about using thick foam sheet material for frames and ABS sheet for the deck, so I can speed up the process a bit. (not having to paint any wooden parts, and use epoxy for bonding) Thing is tough, I need to decide which engine, propellor, shortnozzle and battery combination will be good. (another tread over here) Let's hope that hull is as good as it looks once I'm trimming off the excessive material... it might have become brittle over the years. The plan is - as soon as the hull, deck & hardware are done - get her on the water with the old wheelhouse. Meanwhile I can build a new one using 0.2 and 0.5mm ABS sheet.

3d printing by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
Just a thought, Wayne and RN. If you printed the prop with and oversized hole then epoxy a brass insert tapped to the right thread would that do both jobs? Especially if the insert was knurled and a slight push fit into the prop???? Mark

M.V. TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 days ago
Recently visited the U.K and collected the hull from a relative. It is now back in Canada so a detailed examination can be carried out. First impressions are: 1) The Deans Velarde hull bulwarks have fortunately not been trimmed to the final dimensions, these are marked in pencil. The excess material will really help as the Teakwood forecastle extends further sternwards and this extra material avoids having to build the forward bulwarks up. 2) The hull has many details added to facilitate positioning; portholes, rubbing strakes etc. These will all have to be sanded off as they do not fit the Teakwood. 3) The Velarde has a pronounced “dodger” on top of the bulwarks around the bow. This will also have to be removed. 4) The bow leading edge is quite bluff, possibly to suite the GF manufacturing process. This will probably work in my favour as it can be extended forward and slimmed into the Teakwood style entry, which is sharper and more vertical. 5) The hull is slightly oversize (about .300”) , not enough to be concerned about, but it does make the revised LBP correct! 6) The hull is nicely made and a credit to Deans Marine. The initial plan was to modify the hull shape first to adapt it into the Teakwood. Decided, as it is quite flexible, it would be better to add a keel strip, bulkheads and deck supports first. It would then become rigid enough to work. This revision to my original thoughts proved the best approach. The hull needs several modifications, but until it is rigid it is premature to implement them. The modifications will only prove more difficult and then inaccurate. Made up a number of plywood bulkheads, based upon the MM Velarde plan, but reduced in height to suite the Teakwood. As these are trial fitted into place in the GF hull further adjustments can be made. Once satisfied with the bulkhead fit, they and the keel were epoxied into place. Horizontal stringers were also added to ensure the bulkheads were accurately positioned, vertical and not twisted until the epoxy set. Can probably remove them once the hull structure is compete, although they could also be left in place to support the deck. Will probably largely leave in place. Deck support stringers were also epoxied into place and the hull sides glued to them. The hull is now good and stiff and can be worked safely. As the stern portion will require further adjustment, the sides were left free from the stern bulkhead rearwards. This will allow the rework without cutting through recently fitted items.

Crash Tender Shaft Tube Poistion by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
Hi Dave, agree with the talc idea, sometimes I file a piece of busted terracotta flower pot to powder and mix that with the resin. But usually to repair Gisela's busted garden ornaments not for boat models, but no reason why not😉 But then that's why I suggested the thicker two part glue not the liquid resin for this 'fix'. Re hardeners: as far as I know all are peroxide based but the concentration is different for the various 'speed' glues. Frankly I would have thought that the faster mix on the inside would have accelerated the outer mix, at least at the interface between the two! BTW: It was never suggested to use the epoxy as filler! The resin was just to soak and harden the balsa wedges and hold everything in place. I'm sure I wrote to the effect; when fully cured THEN use filler on the outside of the hull for the cosmetics. Something lost in interpretation?? Anyway step by step Neil is reaching his goal! 👍 @ Neil; you'll need to get a shift on with the 5 min mix! 5 mins is the hard setting time, working time before it goes too stiff to move is only about 2mins!!!🤔 Cheers Doug 😎

Crash Tender Shaft Tube Poistion by neilmc Commander   Posted: 21 days ago
Hi Doug - you're spot on as always it was two different batches. The inside was a 5 minute working and the outside a 30 minute working type epoxy. Thinking was longer on the outside to make sure all holes were filled which has worked sort of. HI Dave - the day did it was lovely and warm so thought I'd be on a winner. I've tried a hair dryer on medium heat but the epoxy goes runny 😣😣. I think I'm going for the removal option a bit of 5 min type epoxy and then finish off with filler. There was still some space filler on the first attempt at epoxy but there'll be more this time. Thanks for advice again I will get this right 🤣🤣

Deck in! by Skydive130 Lieutenant   Posted: 21 days ago
After a week away in Lanzarote, have had a couple of days to get some work done. Left side of hull is now fully sheeted, gaps filled and awaiting final sanding and glass clothing. Decided to get ahead of myself and have fitted all the deck pieces and the cabin deck formers. The inside of the hull has had a second coat of epoxy resin and will get a couple of coats of yaht varnish once the final pieces of internal wood parts have been fitted to include battery tray, motor mounts, prop shafts, servo rail, ESC tray, receiver tray, speaker/engine sound module tray. Up at the bow have fitted the wood for the on/off switch, sanded, sealed and primed the bow deck before adding a couple of the detail parts.

What paint type by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
Hi Scotty (How are the dilithium crystals doing? 😉) Was expecting one of the vintage boat / Fireboat modellers to jump in here! Since no one did here's my two-pennyworth. Basically I consider the actual paint as cosmetic and not primarily to seal out water. Unless you want to use 2 part epoxy paints, which are not so easy to handle🤔 I used it on my U26 sub and it was pain in the you-no-where. First I would use sanding sealer inside and out. Then EzeKote or ClearKote inside and out. Especially where you want to let the planking shine! 👍 From Deluxe Materials - available Down Under from - see pic. this toughens the hull and gives added protection against knocks and bangs. Many of us then paint the inside with Hammerite, colour and texture, hammer or smooth etc, personal choice. This looks neat and is easy to keep clean. Out side acrylic is the easiest and most pleasant to use; water based so the painting tools are easy to clean with warm water and no dangerous to health or inflammable solvents. Easy to airbrush too😉 When the colour coat is finished and good an' dry you can then apply an acrylic clear lacquer coat, matt, silk or gloss as you wish. Hope this helps, cheers Doug 😎

Crash Tender Shaft Tube Poistion by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
Hi neil Mixture and temp are all important. You could try gentle heat from a hairdryer to harden the resin. Adding extra hardener to the mix is not advisable as it can lead to unpredictable results. Epoxy is not ideal as a filler but you can make it more suitable by adding microballoons to the mix. This will result in a very hard finish which you can sand to shape. Personally I use car body filler when fixing in prop shafts / rudder tubes etc as this can be easily faired into the hull contour and will easily take paint. I have successfully used this over epoxy joints. Whatever you use you need to make sure the work environment is not too cold. The temperatures have dropped considerably over the last few weeks so you may need to provide a warm environment to assist the curing process. Dave

Crash Tender Shaft Tube Poistion by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Curious that inside worked and outside didn't! Is it contaminated with something or was it a different batch? Whatever, if some is removable with a knife and / or chisel do that. Then work in the stiffer epoxy glue and try to work it in to the first epoxy which is still soft. You might be better of with the slow version with an extra dollop of hardener, this version (the green one in the pic) will give you more time to work the stuff in. Good luck, don't get stuck up 😉

Crash Tender Shaft Tube Poistion by neilmc Commander   Posted: 22 days ago
Cheers Doug the inside of the hull has set rock solid just the outside boo hoo. Can I use the new epoxy over the top of the not set epoxy or do I have to remove it with a knife?

Crash Tender Shaft Tube Poistion by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Hi Neil, not enough hardener? Try this: use a thick two part epoxy glue, such as UHU Fast - the 5 minute version so get a shift on! Instead of mixing 1 to 1 mix 1 part glue to 1.5 parts hardener (length of the 'worms'!) Work it well into the holes to mix it with the original epoxy as much as possible. If you're not happy with 5 mins working time use the slow version which gives you about 90 mins fiddlin' time. NOTE: With extra hardener the working times will be shortened so try and get done in about 60 mins. You'll soon notice when you can't fiddle any more - the spatula will start to stick to the workpiece😲 Good luck, Doug 👍

Crash Tender Shaft Tube Poistion by neilmc Commander   Posted: 22 days ago
Well it looks like I mixed the epoxy wrong as its still tacky and pliable after a week indoors - back to the drawing board on this one I think. Any ideas 😭😭😭