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>> Home > Tags > epoxy

epoxy
epoxy resin
epoxy
M.V. TEAKWOOD by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
Good job 👍 Had a similar problem many moons ago with the bow on the upper hull of my Type 1A U Boat. Also fixed it with judicial cutting and epoxy. The original 'cut & paste' !? 😉 Following with great interest, can't wait for the next instalment. Cheers Doug 😎

M.V. TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
As the superstructure rose in height it confirmed a suspicion that had been growing for some time. In spite of the copious checks during construction, the leading edge of the bow was twisted slightly by about 3/32” towards starboard at it's base. Not sure how this developed, can only guess there was a slight misalignment during the original modifications that eventually grew to become clearly visible. It was the kind of defect only discernible to a careful observer - or me! Initially hoped to avoid corrective action, but the superstructure build seemed to emphasis the twist. The model is now looking quite good; it would be a pity to compromise it with an elementary, but fundamental, issue such as this. After many measurements, including using spirit levels and squares, decided to cut the trusty bow coat hangar loose, reposition it carefully laterally and then epoxy into place. The longitudinal shape was fine. The pictures show the twist, the cut and then the amount of reposition required. Reconstruction followed the original bow addition procedure. There was a lot of sanding required on the starboard side of the bow to realign the bow and hull transition. Fortunately, this was limited to the addition area, so neither the mechanical nor water sealed qualities of the original Velarde hull have been compromised. After repainting and finishing, all looked well, as shown in the final picture. Concluded this repair was indeed worth the effort. The problem would have been exaggerated in my mind to spoil my enjoyment and then pride in the model. Glass fibre is remarkably forgiving and there should be no reluctance to embark on such modifications when necessary.

Sea Queen Spray Rails by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Yes you do need to fit. Can't remember the exact size but about 1/8" square should suffice. I fixed mine with epoxy and cocktail sticks pushed thro a hole drilled in the rail and hull. Make sure you seal well once finished as any water will be under pressure at speed and will find the smallest of holes! The pic of mine shows the rail just above the joint on the side skins rising slightly at the front. This was an after fit as the water was filling the cockpit at speed. Position is not too important but my model is light (brushless + LiPo) and sits high in the water. If your model floats lower you may need to fit slightly higher, its really the bit that's out of the water when planing that needs to deflect the spray.

Footy by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
I agree with Dave, the hull etc is orange but the rudder is nicely finished wood with a blob of epoxy holding the rudder shaft???? also the keel weight has signs of blistering under the paint, has the weight been cut down???? The keel is not removable so the only way is to experiment by adding some extra weight, a couple of photos show a small hole in the balance weight, i wonder if the plug has been missing for some time and some of the lead shot has fallen out???? Dont know a lot about footies but an ounce of lead would make a critical difference Mark

treatment by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 17 days ago
Hi John, Lets take your questions one at a time. Surface prep. Close joints are always good but not essential, glueing plastic involves a form of welding, ie the surfaces melt together forming a filler as well as a glue. Plastic weld is a model railway product which is very good, it's a liquid applied with a brush and the pieces are held until the liquid evaporates. Prep all surfaces as there might be release agents and / or fingerprints on the surface, washing up liquid is great for this, also when ready for painting wash again and lightly scuff the surface with fine wet and dry paper, (600 grade). Epoxy. Is not a good glue for plastic hulls and superstructures as they flex and move, epoxy is brittle and will fail over time. Finish painting with a plastic primer, (Halfords) this gives a flexible basecote, then paint as desired, i use car type acrylic paints, if you want a colour not as a car, you can get paint made up to your spec. In short, Liquid poly glue, clean before the build and when ready for paint. Hope this helps Mark

treatment by johnmont Petty Officer   Posted: 17 days ago
Hi All,up to now,Ive built exclusively in wood,now I find myself contemplating plastic.What surface prep do I need before glueing,painting etc.I presume that some mouldings/castings will have a release agent on the surface.Epoxy seems to be the adhesive of choice,do you agree?Many thanks all,in advance

M.V. TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Started to add the finishing touches to the hull; portholes, a bulwark capping strip and bilge keels. The portholes were drilled to the outside diameter on the drawing and small sections of styrene tube epoxied in. These were then drilled out and smoothed to the hull contour. Once the hull is painted lenses will be added usimg clear epoxy. The bulwark capping strip is a small styrene “U” section CA glued along the top of the bulwarks. This tidies up the edge and gives a smooth, consistent appearance. Have never been satisfied with previous attempts at bilge keels. Tried making them from both styrene and wood, pinned and epoxied into place. Not very robust, although they looked fine. Plenty of scope for repairs! Decided to try another approach on this model. Purchased strips of 1/4” L shaped styrene and CA glued them into position on the underside of the hull, with the leg facing in towards the keel. Filled the gaps on both sides of the styrene with fibre-glass resin and then rubbed them down, feathering the edges of the bilge keel into the hull. These bilge keels are nice and strong and, from the outside, the bodge is not visible. It can been just seen from the underside if the model ever gets inverted. Hope that is unlikely though! From here on the construction will follow well established principles, so will only write bog updates as significant milestones are achieved.

Plating by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Over the weekend I had been thinking maybe it would be easer to epoxy the plates together. Having almost finished the 2 bottom strakes I will continue soldering. Finding it easer with each plate, as I learn, little tricks. Cleaning the plates with a sanding drum (dermal), keep the plate flat on the bench. Otherwise the plate will cruel up and destroy the sand paper. Don't put to much solder on the iron, or I get lumps of solder as it runs down. I am now holding the plates in place with masking tape. That is working well. Two strakes are taking almost half a can, as there are 12 strakes I will cut up 2 more cans.

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
Thinking back over this part of the project, felt it might be of interest to others considering modifying a hull to summarize my experiences: 1) Cutting and modifying a hull to a different profile seems intimidating, but using planning then care, using a simple selection of workshop tools and adhesives, it is quite within the skill of the average modeler. 2) This is the second proprietary glass-fibre hull I have used. Both required a “spindle” of bulkheads and longitudinal stringers to hold the hull rigid and to which can also be fastened the electrical / mechanical equipment needed for the model. 3) Have tried two approaches for the spindle. The first was to totally assemble it off the hull, get it as rigid as possible, fit it into the hull and epoxy into place. The second was to fit the keel reinforcement to the hull then epoxy the bulkheads and remainder of the spindle to it. That spindle remained relatively flexible until finally installed. 4) On reflection, think it is best to fully assemble the spindle, taking care to get it true and then fit it to the hull. The relatively flexible hull can then be adjusted to fit the more rigid spindle and kept true. 5) Used the relatively flexible spindle arrangement on the Teakwood and have spent many hours getting the bulwarks and deck frames leveled and lined up satisfactorily. The more rigid spindle would have helped mitigate this by ensuring the frame was accurate before trying to adapt it to the hull. Have now finished all the modifications needed to the hull and the result shows that this type of transformation can be successfully completed..

Motor problem by RichardSReade Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
the motor has arrived today so into the workshop this afternoon, of course it is not going to be straightforward, the motor is much larger than the 540 size so the motor platform is too high. I fixed it down well, I did not want this to come loose, managed to cut it out with one of those vibrating cutter, just leaving the glued pieces to remove , not too difficult with a small wood chisel. So in the process of making a motor platform with new stringers so the platform is lower in the hull, break for tea, now going in to workshop to fix down the stringers to the hull and bulkheads with 2 part epoxy, The motor mount has been fixed to the platform with small nuts and bolts with a locking washer, I am going to epoxy the heads to the underside of the platform, so I can undo the nuts without the bolt spinning, not sure how I will fix the platform in as there is not much depth on the stringers to use screws, so I guess two part epoxy again. Should I start a blog as I think this may be an ongoing tale of woe😊

Motor problem by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Richard, molegrips to get the lot out, outershaft and all, its very painful, squeeze tight and twist, you will be supruised how it comes out with some tapping. You could get the bearings out of the top and bottom of your existing shaft, if they look like black plastic, put the shaft in, catch the edge from inside and knock out, they are opush fit, then replace with new 4mm/5mm aceteal, (no doubt spelt wrong)a quid or so each, and are water lubricated. SHG Marine do all of this, they are good at props. If they look metal, they will be either brass, or bronze, and you will prob have to heat the end of the shaft. Try the tapping method, you might get lucky. so now, original outershaft still in place, no bearings either end, and you need a new mm shaft, get stainless. The trick is now, getting bearings to fit if its a real old shaft. Is a good time now to fit an oiler tube whilst everything is out, and clean using thinners etc any gungle inside the shaft. After all this, its not much more effort to get the old one out, and epoxy a new one in, you can buy it complete with inner and outer shafts, bearings, and the right thread, and a couple of test props whilst the wallet is out! Never said it was going to be easy😜

Racing Sloop (no name yet) by Krampus Captain   Posted: 1 month ago
Thank you, Bruce! I normally build boats using Styrene sheets since I don't like to get into the epoxy business. I know others work a different procedure by using clear lacquer and are able to waterproof and give that crystal-like looking appearance. Any ideas you or any other shipmates may offer to this humble swabbie?

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
As the under deck access was now as good as it would ever be, it seem be an opportune time to add the major pieces of operating equipment. One item overlooked in my previous blog was the stern bulwarks. The attached picture reminded me that I had recessed the bulwarks to epoxy a piece of alloy strip onto them. This was another attempt to make sure the bulwark joints were strong enough so they would never pull apart. The alloy strip had been bent to follow the correct profile, which was thus imparted to the bulwarks. The rudder post had been fitted earlier and the rudder horn now installed. The servo location was chosen to fit it close to the rudder. Appreciate the rudder/servo sense is reversed, but this reflects all my models and retains Tx control consistency. Linking them was easy through the generous holes previously cut in the bulkheads. An auxiliary bulkhead was cut and installed to hold the motor. Once the correct spacing and location was achieved, this bulkhead was also epoxied into place. Readers might question my choice of “O” ring and pulley drive. Have used this arrangement on several models and have never had a problem. The “O” rings easily last a couple of seasons, but usually replaced as part of the winter PM program. The arrangement has advantages in that the motor orientation can be reversed to minimize space and alignment requirements are reduced. It is also quiet, easy to work on and a modicum of speed adjustment can be made with the pulley sizes. The black tube in the foreground, looped out of the way, is the shaft oiler feed. Seems to have become is increasingly difficult to buy new shafts with this feature. Not sure just how well they work as always pack the shafts with oil and grease annually, but they do appeal to my Engineering sensibilities. The ESC and will be added Rx later, they will easily fit easily into the remaining space.

lots of sanding by GARTH Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Continued with my project Sea commander hull sheets on deck on & lots of sanding for a smooth finish . Used a clear finishing epoxy it had a lot of bubbles after it dried so more sanding needed .Also made the rudder & shaft from brass rod & tube .

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
As the stern needed the most reshaping, decided to tackle it first. Made up a wooden insert to reflect the correct deck stern contour and glued it in between the deck supports. This would give the stern be the correct shape and length. Once that was positioned pulled the hull up tight to the supports. As the stern is approached the sharper profile of the Teakwood requires the hull sides to be pulled firmly inwards and the transom be vertical. Decided this was not going to epoxy and stay in place satisfactorily once the strain was released, so cut a series of vertical slots in the rear hull to allow it relax and squeeze it together. One slot has to be quite deep, otherwise the lower hull will crack as it will not relax sufficiently. Used the Dremel cutting disc for this. The slots need to be quite generous as the the hull has to be pulled in some distance. Once this was all epoxied in place, wrapped “cling film” around the rear of the hull and poured liquid fibreglass resin around the slots and under the insert to bond everything together. Worked this onto all the vertical and horizontal surfaces as it set. The stern is now good and rigid. The attached pictures show the new stern profile and slots. The first pictures are “as is” to illustrate the process. Further work was also needed to true up the bulwarks and disguise the slots. This mutilation may seem a brutal way of getting the hull shape correct, but had tried all kinds of pulling and squeezing of the hull, none of which held in place after the clamps were released. Once the cosmetic aspects of the stern rework were complete, established the correct location for the rudder post and fitted it. The major stern work is now finished.