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>> Home > Tags > epoxy

epoxy
epoxy resin
epoxy
SHERSCHEN P206 by Inkoust Lieutenant   Posted: 6 days ago
Wooden structure submarine chasers of 70 years in service with Russia and East Germany. Cover with balsa and smeared with epoxy varnish. The model is equipped with two engines of 600 pcs, 2 pcs NiCd battery 3000 mA

Fiberglassing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 days ago
Hi chugalone 100 Welcome to the site. You can fibreglass with different types of resin and cloth. If you are making and casting a fibreglass hull use fibreglass matting but to cover a hull lightweight fibreglass cloth is best. This is the type shown in the suggested video. Resin can be epoxy or polyester based but the latter is generally cheaper and in my opinion is easier to use and doesn't require thinning with alcohol. It is sold as layup resin and is supplied with hardener. Do follow the instructions re quantity of each part and mix thoroughly. If you are using epoxy Iso Propyl Alcohol is the type to use and is clear. The video shows using a brush to apply the resin and whilst this is OK it will give a very thick and heavy coating. I use the brush to apply and then a credit card sized piece of plasticard to spread the resin over and into the surface of the cloth resulting in an almost opaque finish with the weave showing through. You do need to have a good surface to work with as any imperfections will show when the resin hardens. Once dry give a light sanding all over to remove any imperfections and fill any holes with car body filler and sand smooth. I then apply a very thin top coat of the resin using a brush. When dry use wet and dry to sand and if necessary apply further thin coats until you have the finish you require. I have a local supplier and if you visit the site http://www.resin-supplies.co.u k/product.htm all the resins/cloths etc are listed. Using Google should bring up a local supplier. you do need to follow the safety instructions to protect yourself and wear appropriate protection for your hands, eyes and breathing, it is also best to apply in a well ventilated area and not on a cold day. The end result will be well worth the effort to keep your tug waterproof. You could also paint the resin over thye inside of the hull to protect the wood from any water that doeos find its way inside. Dave

Vosper 46" RAF Crash Tender Kit Brand New & Boxed + Almost everything needed to complete the build. by justintime2001 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 23 days ago
Vosper 46" RAF Crash Tender Kit Brand New & Boxed + Almost everything needed to complete the build. Cost £565 - A True Bargain at £325 for the lot. Sale Includes: All items are brand new, unopened Vosper 46" RAF Crash Tender Kit x 1 Boat ESC Programming Card x 1 90A Boat ESC 4A SBEC x 1 11.1V 5000mAh 35C continuous discharge lipo battery x 2 Tornado Thumper V2 4260/06 500KV - Brushless Outrunner RC Motor x 1 Canopy Glue Formula 560 x 1 Prop Shaft - 13" Maxidrive ( 8mm Tube/5mm Inner ) x 1 Propshaft Grease x1 Universal Joint x 1 Propshaft Oiler Clamp Kit x 1 XL Brass Rudder x 1 Waterproof Toggle Switch x 1 ZAP Z Poxy x 1 Dual Power iMAX B6 AC Lipo NiMh RC Battery Balance Charger/Discharger x 1 Woven Glass Twill 100g 1m Wide x 3 EL2 Epoxy Laminating Epoxy 770g + AT30 Epoxy Hardener Slow 230g x 1 30 Amp Inline Mini Blade Fuse Holder & Fuse (Splashproof) x 1 Flexible Silicone Wire Cable 14AWG Red & Black x 1 5 Pairs XT-60 Male Female Lipo Battery Connectors Plugs x 1 Collected from Burton on Trent or Could meet part way Bargain at £325 for the lot. Cost £565 so a saving of £240.

Falcon 2 FSR Endurance Racer by andycoburn Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
The hull was bought from Modell Marin in Sweden owned by Fredde Cederberg, the current Naviga European Champion. It is an ultra-light Carbon/Kevlar/Epoxy composite.

Wheel assembled by Trillium Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
The paddles were cut from 0.050” styrene, the attachment points for the support arms drilled, and the support arms fitted and glued in with epoxy. The paddles and the side wheel assembly were painted black, with small pieces of masking tape over the pivot holes in the paddle support arms, where the pivot tubes were glued to them, and painted over later. When it came to assembling the parts, the sequence was as follows: - Fastened one end of the links to the inside face of the master rod (looks like a banjo); using #2-56 UNC bolts with the bolt heads on the outside face, a 4.5mm length of 1/8” brass tube as a bushing, and two #4 washers, and a #2-56 nyloc nut. - Inserted a #4-40 UNC bolt and washer in the centre of the master rod from the inside, secured it with a 5/32” brass tube bushing, lock washer and nut - Fastened the outer end of the links to the paddle arms, with the links on the outside of the paddle arms, with the bolt heads on the inside face, otherwise same as inner end of the links. The next step is to make the support for the pivot of the feathering mechanism.

Part 2. The searchlight optics. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
The reflector that I originally used for testing came from Maplins and was not a particularly good fit and it also produced a broad diffused light, but I found another lens from the same supplier that could be adapted to fit and would produce a much narrower 10° beam. The lens body was too long to fit into the searchlight body so I 'ground down' the lens on some abrasive to a size that would fit using progressively finer grades of wet & dry paper. The lens was then polished with some cutting/polishing compound to restore the optical clarity.🤓 The original and modified lenses are shown in the 'photos. The lens now fits perfectly into the searchlight body and produces a much narrower and focussed beam of light. I cut and shaped a piece of 1mm clear perspex to form a protective cover over the lens to hold it in the searchlight body and make it waterproof. The searchlight on the real boat has a 'tri-form’ protective cage with a centre boss (my description, there’s probably a proper name for it ), this part is not supplied in the white metal kit so I constructed one from some 22mm copper plumbing pipe, some brass pins and a hand turned and drilled brass rod for the centre boss. These parts were ‘soft soldered’ together as silver soldering would be quite difficult because of the different heat gradients. Before final assembly I will paint the parts gloss grey and secure the optical and protective lens with some canopy glue which will form a flexible seal and won’t ’fog’ the lens as superglue would, and then epoxy the 'tri-form' cage to the front. Hopefully the end result will be well worth the effort and do justice to my brother’s lathe skills!😎

Making the searchlight. Part one. The metalwork. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Having decided to make the searchlight a working feature I needed to make a sturdier base for it as the supplied white metal item is far too weak and not up to the job. This is another job for the man with the lathe......😜 I want the new piece to replicate the original as much as possible so I took measurements of the white metal part and produced a dimensional drawing which I e-mailed to my brother. A short while later the item arrived in the post with another as a spare in case I messed up the first! 😓 I annealed some ‘D’ profile brass rod and formed it to the dimensions of the original cradle and set this into a slot filed into the top of the turned searchlight base. Before silver soldering the cradle into place I spun the part in a drill and rounded off the base with some abrasive to a profile more like the original. I also filed flats at the cradle ends and drilled them, and the searchlight body, to accept some 2mm brass screws to join the two parts together. The base has a 2mm diameter hole bored through to accept the drive shaft from the servo and a very small grub screw secures the base onto this shaft. The 3 watt LED is already epoxy into the searchlight body but I will replace the wire with something thinner and bring it out through the back in some heat shrink tubing. I'm hoping that this will be flexible enough to allow free rotation of the searchlight.😊

To resin cover or not my ulises steam tug by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Mate, welcome to the forum, First of all there is no such thing as newby question, only what you dont know or are uncertain. I would always resin cover the hull, added strength etc, less chance of dings. But, glass cloth or borrow the wifes tights!!! all good for the hull, Resin I have used polyester resin in the past but i now use epoxy layup resin, comes with different time hardeners, or the resin from delux, cant remember the name is water based, (very little smell) I would also pore resin inside the hull as a sealant (between bulkheads and roll the hull around to spread the resin over your planking, also great as you mention its a steam tug so oil etc wont affect the hull. Finish is down to detail sanding and filling, if its smooth to start with it will be far easier to get a smooth finish. Hope this has given you some guidance, shout again if you need more. PS. If your looking for a club, have a look at Etherow MBC we are in Romiley, just out of Stockport Regards Mark

To resin cover or not my ulises steam tug by Rochdaleblue Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi guys sorry if this is a newbie question but is it better to cover and epoxy my plank and frame hull or can I do as the instructions say and just seal fill and paint. Is the resin coating the only way to gets it really smooth.

Navigation lights and circuitry by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
The white metal fittings for the port and starboard navigation lights were hollowed out with a burr in a Dremel tool and a small hole made for the LED lens to go through. After the wiring was soldered onto the LED’s and tested they were set into the fittings with some epoxy. I have pre-drilled the cabin roof and sides for all the fittings and there’s enough wire on each to go to the supply and switching circuit board that will be in the cabin. All of the lighting, including the searchlight, is switched by R/C so I made a power distribution and switching circuit from ‘Veroboard’, my favourite prototyping tool for circuit development. Following my initial drawing of the lighting circuits I laid out the component positions and cut the Veroboard tracks to suit. Each LED is fed through a separate correctly rated current limiting resistor. One switched circuit controls the three navigation lights and the mast light and a separate switched circuit activates the searchlight. I included a spare position on the first circuit just in case I found justification to fit the mysterious stern navigation light that appears in photographs of the 93 boat, research into this has led to a bit of a dead end but nevertheless it’s good to have the capacity to add another light elsewhere if necessary, perhaps the cabin interior, without too much re-wiring. The large ceramic resistor is for the searchlight LED, it only needs to be a 2watt type but I couldn’t find a 3R9 resistor rated at less than 3watts in my bits box, it’ll do the job OK but it looks disproportionally large compared to it’s ¼ watt neighbours. Both lighting circuits are switched separately by R/C switches from Hobbyking, these Turnigy receiver controlled switches are rated at 30v 10A max so they are capable of some heavy switching if required so my little lighting circuits present no problems for them. One important consideration is that the negative supply to the lighting and the negative supply to the receiver have to be bridged for the switches to operate correctly, and this clearly explained in the instruction that come with the switches. The Veroboard has pins soldered into it for the wiring connections, all will be soldered and insulated and the board installed in the forward cabin, I’ll also include a separate charge/operate switch for the battery supply close by. Everything has been tested on the bench and all works as intended, as another will attest, it’s advisable not to do this on the lounge table in case of misplaced confidence in electrical design 😜

water proofing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Colin The Billing plank on frame models are from an earlier era and were very popular in their day. My first model was their Mercantic. I used Cascamite glue which worked fine for about 20 years but then the wood cracked along the glue lines😡. The solution depends on the hull finish you seek to acquire. If you want a bare wood finish then you need to fit and glue the planks very carefully so that the joins look correct. You then need to seal the inside with a thin coat of resin run all over the inside right up to the bulwark. For best results you can use tissue, glass fibre or cloth cut to fit between the formers. Just make sure you stipple the resin into the cloth and try to avoid any bubbles. If your hull will be painted then, after final preparation, you can cover in a similar way as described above. You then rub down and fill any imperfections with Body filler. I usually also do the inside also to protect the internal wood from any water ingress. When I built the Olympic and Titanic with my friend Bill we used this method. I have attached a few pics showing the stages. We built from plans with ply frmes and 4mm balsa sheet. The outside is covered with glass cloth and epoxy resin whilst the inside is covered with Fiberglass cloth and poly layup resin. We took many pics and I have them on my Dropbox account. If you send me a private message with your email address I will share. Its free to join and you can view on line and download as many as you want. Have fun Dave

Submarine wanted by Hansen Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi, I am selling epoxy fiberglass hulls for some subs. Right now, I am finishing work on mold for German Type 214 sub, lenght 135 cm If interested, mail me on peterzak37@gmail.com. I am producing a lot of ship hulls.

Covering hull by manyboats Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
To get the nice reverse curve in the bows, large blocks of balsa were used; luckily got given plenty of them years ago. I did use the thin ply supplied for the hull skin as replacing it is expensive, just recut to suit. After carving the bow shape and sanding everything true I covered the hull with fine woven glass cloth, after coating the hull with spray adhesive and letting it get tacky. After 2 coats of epoxy resin and lots of wet sanding, time to fit the rudder tube and prop shaft (with 3d printed oiler) and motor mounts, then the inside was sealed with epoxy.

Caprails in place and Glued by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
The Bulkheads are about 1/8" thick, which mean that when putting the Epoxy on to glue the Caprails on. you have to be careful not to let the Epoxy run over the bulkheads. I used a piece of wood 1/16" as an applicator which worked ok.

Skeg on King Fisher by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Grandpa I agree with the advice Mark has already given, but would add that the large keel you seem to be adding will make the model difficult to turn. A simple infill from the keel to the shaft will give you all the strength you need without altering the handling characteristics. I usually use a piece of hard balsa to make a fillet. Gouge a slot where it sits on the shaft and epoxy in place. Cover with tissue or cloth coated with sanding sealer or resin. I am attaching a pic of my Sea Queen which shows the skeg. There is a small flared keel forrard of the skeg but this is part of the original design of this fast planing hull. You could add a short flared keel forrard of your shaft for say an inch or two but not to the full depth. Good luck and please share the end result Dave