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>> Home > Tags > exhaust

exhaust
exhaust
tvr steam engine by GaryLCoupland Lieutenant   Posted: 4 days ago
Hi Rick, and I am hoping this helps, the inlet and exhaust manifolds on the engine have no fittings included for you to screw onto, the connecting end is just a plain 1/8" brass pipe, so you need to silver-solder your fitting to suit. I have included a photo which hopefully will help. you are going to need some elbows (90* bends) and maybe a Tee piece or two, globe valves and the pipe fittings to put it all together, plus a condenser to collect and separate the exhaust waste steam. My condenser is simply a piece of 2" brass pipe, I can do you some piping diagrams for you if this helps, or send me a plan of how you are going to connect it all together. The end result will be worth it I promise. Regards, Gary. Hang on in there I have every confidence.

Holy SMOKE !! Video, Tin Can Madness by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
Hi Joe, When you click on the Media File icon have you ever noticed the [Download] button in the top left corner of the media window!!?? 😲 Click on that and you are given the choice to Open or Download the file 😉 BTW: to answer your question above - No scale railway at all! I intend to use the loco smokers in RC conversions of 1/350 scale plastic navy ships, such as; HMSs Ark Royal, Colossus, King George Fifth, Prince of Wales, Exeter, and KMSs Bismarck and Graf Zeppelin. As well as RMS Titanic and my 1/128 HMS Belfast and Graf Spee. Two more perhaps for my Southampton tug. Have used them in the dim and distant past for my 1/72 scale RN destroyer. Built a little RC pulse decoder using CMOS chips followed by a transistor driver to switch a relay supplying the smoker coil. See pics of self etched decoder board. The other three outputs are for various lighting effects and destroyer 'Whoop whoop' siren. 30 years old now and still going 😊 The smokers work pretty well just using the capillary action of the thin glass feeder tubes. So no wick to come into contact with a a hot wire coil 😊 They were mounted on a bridge across the cap of a large spray can which I used as the oil tank. Exhaust used the chimney effect of a 10mm alu tube running up the funnel. I'm also still pondering how to turn the usual white steam/smoke black! Cheers, Doug 😎

Holy SMOKE !! Video, Tin Can Madness by Joe727 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 29 days ago
Hello, Experiment with a tin can smoker works great, see video! I will have to sketch this one up so it's clear on what the pieces are. Uses a little cpu squirrel type fan, two brass tubes, a rubber stopper and a wick. Could not wait to test, will add detail. Had to shoot this video under a bathroom exhaust fan to avoid potentially setting off smoke alarms. It works! Joe

Build by Joe727 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
The heating elements in the hairdryer had two different wire gauges as elements. I removed the lighter gauge thinking they would probably draw less current. I am attempting to use 6 volts as that is what my boat is. 1. First Photo: Took a length of element and stretched it out as shown, started with a longer piece about 8". If you are at 12v probably longer. Use some alligator clip jumpers and attached to one end, ran it to negative terminal of my 6v SLA. Took another jumper and attached to a point on the wire, say about 7". JUST TOUCH the other end to the battery positive to see if it glowed, it did not. So just moved about 3/8" at a time till it glowed - See Photo. CAUTION, make certain you have a nonflammable surface to work on, I used a tile scrap. IT GETS HOT FAST AND WILL BURN, DON'T ASK ME HOW I KNOW. That's why I just touch the terminal till it glows then stop, let it cool for a while. 2. Cut element to length, than take your 16 gauge wire and the crimp tube shown in earlier post. Insert both into the tube and crimp it. I used a side cutter and carefully just squeezed enough. Make sure that the element will not pull out. Do the other end. Because I am using only 6 volts, I had flattened out the wire to give me more wraps on the wick. See photo and note. 3. In the lid of the box, I located the fan at one end, the exhaust stack at the other. Drilled a hole matching the fan opening and secured with two screws, drill small pilot holes so as not to crack the plastic. Drill hole to match brass tube OD, tube is about 1" long or so. Super glued brass tube in place. Excuse the sloppy copper sheet work on the inside of the lid, it was an experiment at the time. I added this a a bit of a heat sheild as the wick and element would sit below this. 4. Next photos show the interior of the box, not the best photos of the process as this was already built.... The mint tin set inside the plastic box was an idea to do two things; first isolate the heating element from the plastic,and two, provide a smaller vessel for the fluid. You may want to just use a metal container instead of the plastic box, again I was just using what I had on hand. The wick is laying in the tin with the element propped up at on end to keep it out of the fluid. Photo shown does not show much fluid in place. This needs some work, but worked for this test. Experiment, just be sure that the lower portion of the wick is in the fluid and the element wire wrap is above the fluid level. For the test, I used some mineral oil and a bit of glycerin, smoked very well. It's late so I will run it and photograph tomorrow. Cheers, Joe (Excuse the Imperial rather than metric)

Can't stop adding stuff by Joe727 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Well, when I started this build I said it was just going to be a quick, easy build.....but I can't stop getting more ideas and adding on. Lights, now exhaust smoke! Could not resist taking time last night to try my hand at a homemade smoker. I was pleasantly surprised at how easy it was to build one and it works great. Then today I decided rather then put it inside the hull I would put it topside for easy access and to keep an eye on it....fires don't do well on boats. Mounted as shown, still in progress but I made an enclosure to cover it. Will fashion a new stack out of the white tube in the last photo. Now what else can I add...... Joe

Reassembly by Joe727 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Continuing on, I finished mounting the light bar, all lights are functioning. For some reason my iPad does not like LEDs and they don't photograph when lit. Made an exhaust stack out of brass tube, mitered the top, soldered and painted. Hull dry now so I mounted the superstructure onto the hatch, reinstalled the tow bits, switch and batteries, RX, motor, etc. Getting close to sea trials, maybe this week schedule permitting. Cheers, Joe

Smoke generator by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Have just made a prototype of a fan forced smoker which seems to be working well (despite breaking the heater coil by moving it while hot, - had it apart, broke wire, screw and washer repair, not quite as hot) I bought a couple of Heng Long smokers (for R/C tanks or cars) to play with, for $10 NZ each(or 5.3 Euros to you Northerners give or take a yen) from Bangood and just bought another from Ebay. There seem to be 2 different models, as one has a long coil with a lamp wick draped over it, which is sitting in the oil reservoir, the other has a small coil inside a piece of heat resistant woven tubing (as you might find insulating toaster/heater wiring etc) which acts as a wick and that also sits in cotton wool in the reservoir, (this seems to be the better of the two) Tip - don't fill the tank right up, only enough to soak the cotton, element should be just out of the oil. The wick loads the element. The better model seems to have a black top to the tank (also maybe either brown or black tank) and the other has a brown top and dirty brown tank. As with most of this stuff you won't know till you get it what it's going to be. What I did was remove the tank and cut off the pump tube just in front of the screw lugs (see black line in photo) then fitted the tank, and a 40x40x10 5v ESC fan (voltage controlled by a UBEC set to 5v on the jumpers) into a plastic electronics utility box from Jaycar (our local electronics and hobby store). I made up a double JST lead for the 2s 1800Mah Lipo and fired it up (using baby oil). It's pretty much silent and smokes well once it gets warmed up, ( starts smoking in about 5 seconds) You could control it (on/off volume) by either a remote on/off switch or perhaps a small cheap 10A brushed ESC. I would leave the fan running and control the element to avoid burning the element. The original pump tank inlet hole seems ok as is (approx 1.5mm) but you could enlarge it very slightly to get a better flow if you could find a better oil. At the electronics store they have proper smoke machine oil for $20 NZ per litre so I may have a look at that. The reason I went for the fan idea was that I found in std pump form, if I immersed a tube from the tank in water, it sucked water back into the tank. I was hoping it would pump smoke out of my HSL exhausts at water level alongside the cooling water but it would need a very light non return valve to do this. The fan seems to pump the smoke through 2mm ID silicone tube ok, so tubing of similar ID to the OD of the tank outlets should work well. These pumps in original form work pretty well for the price, and are cheap enough to keep a few for spare elements, the only thing is they are a bit noisy but in an 'engine sounding' way, (might add to the effect on a tug or work-boat though) What you have left after this mod is a very handy little geared motor with an eccentric output wheel which could be used for winches, radar and whirly bits of any description (see pic of motor leftover and original) To avoid burnout, these should be run on no more than a 2s (around 7.5v-(suggest 8v max with fan running) The other tank is going to work a lot better than this one but I'm not making a tug, just want a bit of exhaust smoke on start-up etc to go with the 2 sound units. Very cheap to make (around $25 NZ with pump, box, fan and UBEC all through Ebay, Aliexpress and Bangood (and local electronics store) If you wanted to run an ESC to control the smoke and you have no channels left to control it proportionally, you can always try using a second receiver bound to your TX, (if your TX will allow it,) power it and a brushed ESC (wired to the element) as normal and use the throttle channel to plug in your smoke control. This should work if you want more smoke as you accelerate or if you are using only 1 stick on a 2 stick TX you could use your 'elevator' stick pushed up (or a toggle switch if available) to start/stop the smoke (through the brushed ESC setup) . This setup weighs 100g (10g more than std) The quest for lots of smoke continues Will try to upload vid later and update progress.

Plumbing the water-cooling for the ESC by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
The HobbyKing ESC I’m using has the facility for water cooling and as it will be in an enclosed location without any free ventilation it seems sensible to utilise this feature. To keep the water circuit as short as possible I will put the pickup just behind the propeller and the exhaust on the stern but as the boat has a bulkhead just in front of the stern skin I need to make an access hole through it to allow me to secure the nut on the stern skin. I made a hole through the bulkhead large enough to get a socket on the nut and reinforced the hole with a ply plate, similarly I reinforced the inside of the stern skin where the outlet passes through it. When I was happy that the arrangement worked and I could attach the hoses and securing clips easily I glued and pinned the stern skin to the hull. The water pickup is a standard one that is readily available but it’s supplied with overly large and ugly fixing nuts, the inside one is of no consequence but I thought that the outer one needed smartening up so I put it on a threaded rod and locked it in place with another nut and put that into the chuck of a drill and used a file to re-shape the nut to a pleasing taper….who needs a lathe......😜 I had to reduce the height of the inner keel former as the pickup tube is not long enough to get a good fixing with the internal nut, as the inner keel is balsa I fitted a ply reinforcing plate to spread the load. The last ‘photo shows the location of the ESC, main battery fuse and receiver. The hoses will be secured to the ESC with spring clips throughout. I found that the silicone tube I use tends to kink rather easily if the radius of a bend is too small and I found it necessary to form a tight spring coil around the piece that loops the water back through the ESC to prevent this happening.

Smoke generator by marlina2 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
A bit of confusion over what i wrote last night (note to self dont mix the internet with rum) I did not use a piezo unit, I used ultrasonic units, the kind that are fitted to fire places to produce the smoke and flame effect. The water depth seems to be the critical factor in the amount of mist produced. I am not looking for masses of dark smoke just enough to simulate diesel exhaust. This was just a prototype that works quite well but I am going to revisit it and try to improve the output and look for an ultrasonic unit that will work at 12v

Smoke generator by marlina2 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
I have made a smoke generator using a piezo transducer and a P68s variable speed brush less fan controller from action electroncs. The transducers tend to be 24v dc and are relatively cheap (£2-£3 each). I am using S3 lipos so I only have 11.4 available but a very cheap variable output unit gives me 24v. The fan is connected in-between the receiver channel for the throttle and the speed controller. The fan speed increases with the throttle and follows the throttle speed regardless of direction. The net effect is quite pleasing for diesel exhaust simulation, with a steady stream when the stick is centralised and the fan just idling. On fwd/rev throttle movement you get an increasing amount of exhaust dependent on speed. I have this installed in my Forceful paddler with twin funnels. The effect is quite realistic but can be difficult to see. I am looking for a another transducer that will produce more vapour. in its present configuration it will run for around 3 hours before topping up is required.

Smoke generator by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
Been thinking how I could build a compact sealed electric smoke generator with a pump to push the smoke through the exhausts, along with the cooling water on my HSL. Are the model train smokers not big enough for your purposes. You could just copy one of those and enlarge it perhaps. From what I remember from my train days they were not too complicated. How about an upside down ic glow plug with a variable voltage regulator in the bottom of a tube with a low temp oil ? You could possibly use a small brushed ESC for the regulator and come up with a controlled drip feed replenishing system. Just seen a site SMOKE EL in Germany which makes smokers for ic and electric planes but they look expensive and complicated,- work well though,-vids on site.

All hooked up, nowt happens... by rapidair65 Seaman   Posted: 3 months ago
Arun now sorted. Programming card did not work so I translated the pidgin english instructions for the ESC and it worked using the Tx. I now have forward and reverse, correct prop rotation and no battery protection. Also the water cooling system for the ESC works with the water exiting from the exhausts on the stern. On the down side the nav lights have stopped working! Pictures of installation and finished boat later.

Veron Tarpon by Biscuit Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
Well I had one of these back in the early 1970,s been looking for years for another one must of been a rare boat. So I was surprised when this turned up on eBay last week. So I had to buy it, the seller did not mention that the engine a Merco 35 was locked solid and all the head bolts were missing and the whole inside of the boat was soaked in sticky castor oil exhaust residue, but this is how I like them loft fresh and not messed with. I don’t think it’s hardly been used, I managed to get the engine apart after heating it up with a blow lamp looks like it’s hardly been run but the liner got a fair bit of rust on it so not sure I can use it. The only thing to remove the sticky castor oil was 25% nitro fuel, the one I bought in the 70,s cost me £27 this wreck I bought in 2018 £70 but I will enjoy restoring it, this is the boat as how I got it and now with the engine out that was another nightmare 😁

HMS M.33 by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
"Manxman was about when I was in the RN in the sixties." Yes Nick, but by then apparently not in her original form, role or speed! Cheers, Doug 😎 "Summary of Post War Service. HMS MANXMAN was first deployed to support the repatriation of British and nationals of allied nations and carried stores and supplies from Sydney to Japan. On later trips she went to Shanghai and Hong Kong which was used as the base for the BPF in 1946 and 47. In June 1946 the ship returned to UK and was refitted at Sheerness before returning for further service with the BPF in February 1947 as relief for HM Cruiser EURYALUS. At the end of that year she was nominated for reduction to reserve status and returned to join the Reserve Fleet at Sheerness. In 1951 this ship was brought forward for operational use and following a refit joined the Mediterranean Fleet in September 1951. After two years she was again placed in Reserve and laid-up in Malta where she remained until again refitted. The after 4” mounting was removed and she re-commissioned in February 1956 for duty as Flagship of the Mediterranean Fleet Flotillas. During this service she took part in relied operations after an earthquake in the Lebanon as well as taking part in NATO and Fleet exercises in the Mediterranean. She was deployed for headquarters duties during the Suez operation later in 1956 and the next year returned to Malta to lay-up in Reserve. Refitted for further service after tow to Gibraltar in 1958 she returned to lay up Malta until 1961 when she was selected for conversion into a Support Ship for minesweepers at Chatham where she was taken in hand by HM Dockyard on 17th July that year. During this work the other two 4” mountings and two boiler rooms were removed which reduced her speed significantly. Additional accommodation and support workshops were fitted to suit her new role and work was completed during February 1963. Whilst on trials in April 1963 she visited the Isle of Man where she grounded whilst in Douglas Bay. On returned to Chatham the ship prepared for service in the Far East and re-commissioned on 23rd September that year for support of the 6th Minesweeping Squadron at Singapore. She deployed in that role until late in 1968 and arrived at Portsmouth on 12th December." "In reserve at Malta and refitting She was refitted in Chatham in the early 60's and converted to a minesweeper support vessel. When the forward boiler was removed and the compartment was fitted with diesel generators to supply outboard power to minesweepers, she was fitted with a dummy forward funnel, which housed the diesel exhausts and ventilation for the compartment. Much of the mine stowage was removed to make way for additional accommodation. Commissioning in 1963, she was subsequently stationed in Singapore. Returning to the UK in 1968, Manxman was used for engineering training at Devonport and following a fire, was transferred to the reserve at Chatham Dockyard until broken up at Newport in 1973."

Voltage increasing via regulator by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
A somewhat confused question if I may say so Eric!😲 You can't 'regulate up' only down. The regulator's job is to produce a constant lower voltage from a range of higher voltages. I often use one to produce 5V for the RX and servos from a 12V SLA drive battery. A little 3 legged device (type LM7805) which looks just like the power FETs in a high current ESC. My version of a UBEC! 😉 What is this 'regulator' you have? Type number? Manufacturer? Photo? To get 12V from 7.2V you would need to use a Voltage converter (also known as an inverter). This works by converting the DC input from the battery to an AC voltage which can then be increased using a transformer. More elegant (and expensive!) versions use a transistor oscillator and amplifier. This uses hi-power transistors instead of the transformer. The AC output of the transformer (or amplifier) is then rectified back to DC. All this is very inefficient which is why it is normally only used for very light currents, where the losses are not so significant, and when there is no other alternative, not often the case! You can't beat the physics and you will never get the same power out that you put in. This leads to a basic design question:- What is the total current consumption of the load? I.e. the motors. A simple example:- Let's say that at 7.2V the motors draw 10Amps total, i.e. 72W (or VAmps). Assuming a utopian 100% efficiency at 12V this would equate to 6A. Due to the three stages of conversion; DC to AC, transformation / amplification of AC to 12V, AC back to DC, you'll probably be lucky to get an efficiency of around 60% to 70%. Thus if you stick 720W in you'll get around 430 to 504W out. Not much of a gain is it!🤔 Your battery would be exhausted in about 2/3 the time it is now 😡 If your motors draw more than 10A the problem just gets worse. So what is it you really want to do? If you just want to up the volts to your motors stick a 12V SLA or an 11.1V LiPo (3S) in and hope that you don't cook your motors! Frankly I don't really know why you're bothering, tugs aren't sprinters! If you want more pulling power with the existing setup try experimenting with prop sizes and pitch. Will probably achieve much more than fiddlin' about with voltage converters. BTW: All this assumes that the RX has it's own separate 5V battery supply or from a BEC in the ESC. Some clarification needed from your side. Cheers, Doug 😎