Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
September 2018: 10 people
August 2018: 5 people
July 2018: 8 people
June 2018: 8 people
May 2018: 7 people
April 2018: 24 people
March 2018: 13 people
February 2018: 8 people
January 2018: 17 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (19)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > fiberhull

fiberhull
fiber glass
fiberglass
fiberhull
Miss Canton by Cozwhy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 12 days ago
[Score: 5/10] 24" Miss Canton Single Propellor Direct Drive to a Midwest - Comments: Old wooden kit refurbished with fiberglass coated hull.

Deans Robert E. Perry Libertyship by Mikep Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Started building Deans Marine Libertyship Robert E. Perry finished Lenth 54 1/2” beam 7 1/2” weight 35 lbs. Power is Deans motor Falcon 3671 6 volt 1500rpm 3.19mm shaft and prop 147-18 brass propeller 50-L-4bl-M4. Kit is very nicely done all fittings and hardware are included with the kit. The hull is detailed and I have lined the inside of the hull with 2 x 2 oz. fiberglass cloth and resin to give it more rigidity. I have installed the motor and prop shaft along with the rudder which I replaced since the kit supplied rudder was cast resin and only had a 3/32 dia shaft, I’m sure it would work fine but felt better with something a little more substantial. Added 5 lbs of ballast I used shot and installed sub floor in hull. Equipment installation and deck fitting, added 1/8” plywood as deck and styrene on top.

Dumas USS Crockett by Mikep Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Asheville Class gun boat model is 51” long weighs 22 lbs. hull covered with 2 layers of 2 oz. fiberglass cloth and resin. All plywood and balsa construction finished with fiberglass resin and Model Master paints. Working radar mast, turrets, desiel sound, whopper sound, general quarters sound, sierene. Power is MACK Drives 12 volt system 2 x 2 6volt 3000 nimh each drive. Very fast in the water.

Sterling Emma C Berry by Mikep Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Model is 49” long and with ballast keel added weighs 17 lbs. hull is covered with 2 layers of 2 oz. cloth fiberglass cloth and painted with Krylon spray can paint. Hitec sail winch servo for main sail and standard servo for jib. Model has auxiliary 6 volt electric power to compincate for my sailing ability’s and wind conditions. Sails are Mylar.

Dumas Chris-Craft Cobra by Mikep Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Model is 28” long weighs 7lbs. Hull covered with 2 oz. fiberglass cloth deck covered with 3/4 oz. fiberglass cloth and resin finished with spar varnish. Power is MACK 5045 motor and 2 6 volt x 3000 nimh packs.

Adele by Mikep Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 36"/6400g Adele Capable of 12mph and a runtime of 30mins Twin Propellors (2 Blade S Type 40mm) Direct Drive to a MACK 5045 (2 Blade S Type) Powered by NiMH (14.4v) 5Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through MACK 35 (35Amps) ESC - Comments: Model is from Dumas kit hull covered with 2 layers or 2 oz. fiberglass cloth and resin. Deck mahogany covered with 3/4 oz. cloth and resin, painted with klass Coat epoxy paints. Running lights and cabin light. Built with removable interchangeable bridge windscreen or windscreen with roof.

push tug.. by Steve-Teresa Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Having put together a couple of "kit's" over the years, normally with fiberglass hull, I decided after having a electrical failure while on the local pond that I could do with something to retrieve a stricken boat, but with what and how, well after posing the question of what others do I decided to have a look about and found some idea's for a push tug, it seemed like the ideal thing and was something like I was looking for, I didn't purchase a kit, instead decided to build it myself... After making the hull according to the plan's, I looked at it and thought... na, that won't work. the plan's gave the hull a half moon shape, I found that it didn't balance well and needed a fair bit of weight due to the displacement, so I cut the bottom of and now is a flat bottom vassal, this sat better and stable in water.. I intend to run it on a 12v sla battery and two Mtroniks 600 motors... the deck and cabin has copied the general shape but a few changes to add features and suit the design that pop's into my head as I go... its coming along well I think... all materials are mostly odd's and end's, bit's I find and mixed wood except the deck's which I intend to varnish with white sides..

Fibreglass the hull- continued by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Now the Chine rubbing strakes are fitted, dry and filled and I have attended to the minor lumps and bumps the next job is to give another coat of resin, taking the issues of the first application into account I intend to apply a thin coat, this has the effect of filling in the pattern of the glass cloth. Another two days have passed and it’s time to do some rubbing down. I have found that the surface is very hard, more so than I recall some of the other fibre glass projects I have done but these have been using Polyester resin. It’s a first for epoxy, so is epoxy a better choice than Polyester? According to my mini research –  Epoxy is more versatile  Epoxy has fewer fumes  Epoxy is stronger  Epoxy shrinks less Conclusion Epoxy is the better choice for repairing/covering either wooden hulls or repairing fiberglass boats. It has excellent adhesive qualities, wets out fiberglass fabrics and it is tough. It has great thin film cure characteristics, cures in cool temperatures. After the first coat I wasn’t 100 % happy with the finish but I just thought that some dust had landed on the surface before the resin had dried, (this was proved not to be dust but because of the matting pattern still been visible it disguised the real problem) however this was easily sanded out with wet & dry. Now the hull and deck were looking really smooth with very little sign of the matting pattern it was time to give a final coat. I had decided to coat both the deck and the hull in one go so I mixed enough resin to do the lot. Starting with the deck I started to apply the resin but to may horror it started to pin prick all over the deck surface, panic, panic what was causing this? So was it the brush which I had previously washed out with cellulose thinners after applying the last batch of resin. I decided to remove the resin and use a new brush (I had 90 mins cure time to do this) so cleaning of with paper towel and finally with a wipe with thinners I started to apply resin again – but it happened again as I sat in despair I looked into the pot of resin wondering where to go next when I saw a film on the top of the remaining resin It was then I noticed a ridge in the cups side. It was the wax coating that had melted into the resin and subsequently appeared as pin pricks in the newly applied surface. At this realisation I removed all the resin again and took a breather hoping I had found the problem. Another day and a light rub down of the deck to make sure the surface is ready to receive its final coat. Resin weighed (in a glass container this time) and well mixed I started to apply again and fortunately it was OK and all surfaces were coated.

Fascis Board and Molding! by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
The engine room floor is in place. using Resin it's not going any where! It's ok I'll make do! I believe that Dumas used the motor mount floor design from their fiberglass hull. So it fits very high in the plastic hull design! No worries it will work! It better!!!!!!😡😊

Fishfull Thinking by Krampus Admiral   Posted: 7 months ago
Greetings from Germany! I've been out of the net for a while and rebuilding this boat with a totally new superstructure, paint job and electronics. I obtained the fiberglass hull measuring 24.5 X 9 inches from a California fellow via E-bay. Formerly a 45-footer Chris Craft at 1:24 scale, this updated vessel was inspired on a 1970s 30-footer Chris Craft Tournament Fisherman and on 1970s 28 and 33-footer Bertram boats. 😁 The Chris Craft in the attached picture from an early days brochure was the very only Chris Craft utilizing a Deep-Vee hull. The story goes that they apparently copied their boat following the lines of a Bertram 28 based on famed boat designer Ray Hunt. Bertram sued in court and Chris Craft ended up building less than 200 boats of this type. After all, the Chris Craft vessel ended up being better than the Bertram in terms of cabin space and overall value. Highly cherished within the American sports fishing community, many of these boats are still up and running.

Juyilanga by Krampus Admiral   Posted: 7 months ago
[Score: 9/10] 25" Juyilanga Capable of 15mph and a runtime of 50mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 35mm) Direct Drive to a 500 series Johnson 69215 (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (9.6v) 4Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Mtroniks Viper Marine 40 (40Amps) ESC - Comments: Inspired in now defunct American manufacturer Uniflite, this boat is based upon 1970s-early 80s 28-footer model "Salty Dog" and is built on approximately 1:16 scale. Fiberglass deep-vee hull made in the U.S.A. Superstructure made with 2mm ABS plastic sheets. Equipped with 9v lights system. Completion time: nearly 5 months.

Rubrails in place! by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
The rubrails are know in place! 1/8" square plastic rods are glued. on to the rubrail padding. On the fiberglass hull this was molded on the hull! The hull becomes very rigged. After you put the rubrail padding. Then put the rubrail on. Makes the hull quite sound!👍

Bondo the keel! by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Hi Doug, The Brooklyn Tug will be my last model from Dumas. Their QC is really bad, they give you a very well drawn blue print of the model. then give you sub standard components to build said model! I just noticed there's going to be a difference of 1/2 a millimeter. In port and starboard Bulwark thickness. This won't be seen to others. But I'll know it's there! I must press on..... I really wish they would have stayed with the fiberglass hulls!

False Keel in place! by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
After grinding the flange that's 1/4" high. Took all day long! grind here, sand there! False keel is now in place. A bit of bondo to fill the gaps! Lots of sanding to do! there's a big difference between the fiberglass and the ABS. Lots more work to do on the ABS hull! Note: Make sure to mix the Bondo (p38) correctly!👍 I find if it's not mixed correctly. It will crack after a while!😱😲😤

Trim the Keel! by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Unlike the fiberglass hull. that use to come with the Brooklyn. The ABS hull has to be trimmed down (Flange) to the hull! After this you'll put a 3/8" x 1/4" piece of plastic on the hull! This will then become the keel! Be careful not to go into the hull. While your trimming the hull! Note: Try to be as neat as possible! Cutting the flange down to the keel! Make sure the keel is flush against the keel! Then after that glue the 3/8" plastic to the keel! Be neat so you don't have to use. That much Bondo (P38)! Also while putting the Bondo (P38). Be neat with too!