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>> Home > Tags > fibre glass

fibre glass
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Thames cruise barge by markiee Seaman   Posted: 23 days ago
total scratch built on fibreglass hull 127cm x24 cm,11 months to build 6volt system brushed motor,3blade 35mm brass prop.

Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build by reilly4 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
Sakibian, My friend Graham built his E-boat with a fibreglass hull but scratch-built everything else. He does magnificent detail work. For you to build this hull you first need to get the plans to the scale you want to build. 1/24 is good for these models. The cross sections are essential. You need to determine how many bulkhead frames you will require. You won't require as many as shown on their plan and photos - maybe less than half - as many as will enable you to support the stringers to give you a shape of the hull on to which you can fix the planking or skin. The frames you choose need to be at or very close to cross sections, so you can use them to mark and cut your frames. I use 5mm plywood. There is a photo of my Fairmile D frame earlier in this series of posts. One of my earliest posts on this website was a Youtube video with the E-boat and my Fairmile D in action with sound effects.

Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build by reilly4 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
Hi Sakibian, The PT boat site now sells stuff too, but was originally a site where the author John Drain described how he was building his PT boat and then the E-boat. There are good plans and examples of how he has constructed these boats. My Fairmile D was made from plywood frames, pine stringers, planked and skinned with balsa and then fibreglassed. It was a very interesting and difficult shape, but very satisfying once completed. It sails beautifully in the most difficult conditions. I have also included a few more pics of my friend's E-boat with the newer camouflage for further inspiration.

Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build by reilly4 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
The E-boat was built and belongs to a friend of mine - Graham Smithwick. It is a fibreglass hull and he has had it for a long time. There are plenty of resources on E-boats. This is a very good one. http://www.pt-boat.com/ I have also included some photos of his E-boat before the newer camouflage.

Vosper RTTL by Welshsailor Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
[Score: 5/10] 34" Vosper RTTL Twin Propellors (4 Blade 35mm) Direct Drive - Comments: Recently acquired fibreglass hull and plan. Build to take place in parallel with others on the bench over the next six months.

Sea Queen by BOATSHED Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Roger.com, I am not so sure about being less detail on a Norfolk Broads Cruiser. I have a small 21ft fibre glass hulled boat in Potter Heigham on the Broads. But when you see the older wooden Broads Cruisers they have lots of detail especially the ones that get cared for as they should being wooden built. Some of them are so beautiful and well varnished polished brass, Chrome fittings and well groomed. If I could afford a wooden cruiser and be able to keep her in the fashion she should be kept then I would. But if I win the lottery then I will have one. Even the old wooden sailing yacht's are kept in wonderful condition and lots of detail brass etc.

Ship rudders by Toby Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Thanks R in Munich! The shapes of brackets under the rivets are cut out from a sheet of fibre glass. Depending on contour held in place with a dab of CA or the finishing resin, then topped with finishing resin. I have now to decide if I use the rivet method for the reset of the ship. The hull effect was via dabbing pva glue but some spread slightly and thus look over scale on some. 1mm ~50mm so a rivet head spreading to 2-3mm ~ 100-150 and I think a 6" rivet head might be unrealistic? What was ther likely rivet head size on such ships. Toby

steam water pump by GaryLC Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
You don't need to buy a water tank, simply build one into your hull using plywood and fibre-glass, the favourite is the sharp end simply fit a wooden bulk-head and cover it in fibre-glass.

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Kevin, Yes I did, because of the complexity of the shape that was another technique that could have been used. I decided to use glass fibre as the cowl is around 7" wide and 3 1/2" deep. Considered a draw of that depth was beyond my skill and facilities with plastic sheet. If they are available it would have been a good approach. The more I work with glass fibre the more forgiving it seems to be. Not many mistakes that cannot be disguised or corrected! Rowen

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Back to the build. Next milestone, to complete the superstructure and engine covers. The superstructure is essentially a cowl that supports the open bridge and serves as the air intake for the gas turbines. The engine covers fit into the rear of it. The superstructure is full of curves and will be interesting to make. Still trying to save weight, decided to make it out of glassfibre. Rather than first make a plug then a female mould and finally the cowl, wanted to try the technique of making a plug out of styrene foam sheet, then covering it in a glass fibre matt. Once the glass fibre is set, the foam is dissolved out using a solvent and the cowl remains – Inshallah! To ensure the foam did not react to the glass fibre resin, painted the finished cowl with enamel paint before sticking the matt down. See pictures. What a mess! The resin had crept under the paint and into the foam dissolving it. When the resin dried the plug had shrunk slightly and had the surface finish of a quarry. First thought was to hurl it and start again, this time in wood. On second thoughts, wondered if the plug could still be used. Decided to build it up with wood filler and from it make a female mould, as originally intended. The cowl would then be made from the mould. Built the damaged plug up and sanded it smooth. As the plug would be covered in fibreglass, the surface finish was not critical. Brushed a coat of fibreglass on the plug and, after drying filled any defects with glaze putty and sanded smooth. Once the finish and dimensions were satisfactory, applied a thicker coat of glass fibre to the plug. This was again smoothed down, waxed with carnauba polish and then covered in mould release. From it the cowl was made. Picture shows plug, mould and cowl placed side by each. The cowl requires reinforcement; the fittings and various mountings then adding before installing. A trial installation showed that it fitted properly the deck and was accurate. A lesson for the next time is to make the plug and mould much deeper than the finished item. That will allow any rough edges, on either the mould or the component, to be trimmed off leaving a smooth fibreglass edge.

HMS Cadiz by landie Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 10/10] 48" HMS Cadiz Capable of 3mph and a runtime of 120mins Twin Propellors (3 Blade 25mm) Direct Drive Powered by LiPoly (14.8v) 7Amp/h Batteries - Comments: Scratch built other than a fibreglass hull, built by my father over about 5 years using a mix of balsa, plasticard, ply and wire. He never sailed it but when I inherited it I was determined to complete it ready for it's first "sea trials". I've completed the RC installation and adjusted the ballast and it's now had two successful outings at the local boating lake.

Ferdinand Keulen by Toby Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 5/10] Twin Propellors (4 Blade 40mm) Direct Drive - Comments: Fibre glass hull. Wooden and plastic superstructure. Built using the hull and plan.

Proboat Sonicwake by boaty Admiral   Posted: 3 months ago
Three weeks ago I got a Proboat Sonicwake deep V fast electric. This appears to be a replacement for their previous model Vorocity. Very interesting self righting method with a water tank on the port side, slots in the deck and a large exit point at the stern. Idea is that if it capsizes, water will enter through the slots and as it draws the boat under, the air trapped in the hull will self right it. If the boat is stationary in the water, it will list to port due to water entering through the stern outlet and when power is applied it will empty out. Bit scary to watch at first as I thought the boat was on its way to Davy Jones. I use waterproof marine clear tape to seal around the hatch ever time I use it. The quality of the hull raises a few concerns. This relates to its ABS construction as the vast majority of similar boats at that price are made of fibreglass which is much more rigid and would be more suitable for the high speeds. Makers claim it does 50 MPH plus on 6S lipos. The electrics however are excellent with the exception of the external quality of the Horizon Hobby STX2 TX which looks a bit "toyish". For myself, this is not relevant as I replace all my wheel TXs with the "stick type" and I found that the Futaba T2HR fulfils all requirements and worked well when I sailed the boat. I have not yet changed the stock prop for an Octura one, the latter works great on my Blackjack 29 with a noticeable increase in performance. The motor is a Dynamite Marine W.C brushless 1900 KV with a 120 amp W.C ESC . 😁😋 Boaty.

Hydro by Purser1944 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 33"/2000g Hydro Capable of 0mph and a runtime of 10mins Single Propellor (2 Blade X Type 45mm) Direct Drive to a Sss4075 (2 Blade X Type) Powered by LiPoly (18.5v) 5Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Flycolor (105Amps) ESC - Comments: Complete fibreglass.straight shaft, uses three channels. Speed,Rudder,and flaps for rear plane .when using best to wear brown trousers (on 5 cells I have had 57.4 mph

Leilah Marie by Purser1944 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 48"/2000g Leilah Marie Capable of 10mph and a runtime of 60mins Twin Propellors (3 Blade 55mm) Direct Drive to a GHD (3 Blade) Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) 5Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Hobbyking (20Amps) ESC - Comments: Fibreglass hull and top.deck is hand laid planking with black card in between to simulate caulking.props are prop shop three blades at 55mm each working radar and search lite. Mainmast lights consist of white over red, learned this very early in my career first thing you see when pilot comes aboard is his white hair, followed by his red nose..... full lighting system. Plus nav lights