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>> Home > Tags > fibreglass

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MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
As the stern needed the most reshaping, decided to tackle it first. Made up a wooden insert to reflect the correct deck stern contour and glued it in between the deck supports. This would give the stern be the correct shape and length. Once that was positioned pulled the hull up tight to the supports. As the stern is approached the sharper profile of the Teakwood requires the hull sides to be pulled firmly inwards and the transom be vertical. Decided this was not going to epoxy and stay in place satisfactorily once the strain was released, so cut a series of vertical slots in the rear hull to allow it relax and squeeze it together. One slot has to be quite deep, otherwise the lower hull will crack as it will not relax sufficiently. Used the Dremel cutting disc for this. The slots need to be quite generous as the the hull has to be pulled in some distance. Once this was all epoxied in place, wrapped “cling film” around the rear of the hull and poured liquid fibreglass resin around the slots and under the insert to bond everything together. Worked this onto all the vertical and horizontal surfaces as it set. The stern is now good and rigid. The attached pictures show the new stern profile and slots. The first pictures are “as is” to illustrate the process. Further work was also needed to true up the bulwarks and disguise the slots. This mutilation may seem a brutal way of getting the hull shape correct, but had tried all kinds of pulling and squeezing of the hull, none of which held in place after the clamps were released. Once the cosmetic aspects of the stern rework were complete, established the correct location for the rudder post and fitted it. The major stern work is now finished.

Schooner by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
[Score: 9/10] 60"/7600g Schooner - Comments: Scratch built with mahogany planks on the club's mould. Glass cloth and fibreglass inside and protected with G4 polyurethane resin all over. Uses a sail winch (Hitec) and travelling dolly for the two main sails and a separate arm servo for the foresails. Standard servo for the rudder. Power is from a 6.6v 1000mA LiFe battery. Taranis Tx using two sticks with the sail servos connected via an internal mixer to one stick. Ballast is fixed to the keel with two studs which extend into the hull where a steel bar is attached between both and acts as a carrying handle.

Kyosho Fortune 612 by AllenA Admiral   Posted: 4 days ago
Had this Fortune 612 delivered through the post while in Hospital and when unpacked found that the keel had broken at the base. Any advice please as to a suitable method of repair as I can't seem to find a replacement on 'tinternet'. Fibreglass comes to mind???

Brixham trawler IBEX by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
Hi Bellman My Club sail several similar boats as well as an Ibex. They are all fitted with detachable keels which are fitted prior to sailing but can be removed for transportation and display. Our sailing waters are large and exposed and without the keels the models would not be able to be sailed. On the water the keels can not be seen. I tried a long keel on my Cariad and it was not a success as the keel tended to keep the model in a straight line. I now use a detachable bulb keel. The amount of lead will depend on your model and its overall weight. The bulb keels are a fibreglass moulding that we fill with lead to bring the model to waterline after inserting fore and aft threaded rod into the bulb. You will need to have holes in the keel to let the rods thro and long enough to be above the waterline. I fit a plastic tube and wood support inside. A washer and nut hold the keel in place. Before filling with Resin weigh the resin in the tin and remove that amount of lead from the bulb. Once set I use silicon to make a good seal between the bulb and hull and which remains attached to the bulb. Attached are pics of my Cariad.

Plasticard boats by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
Hi Welcome to the site If it's plasticard using fibreglass or paint stripper may cause it to melt. What is your intention for the hull? Can you post a pic? If the hull paint is sound you may be able to rub it down with fine wire wool and overpaint.

Fairmile D - MGB623 and MTB741 by reilly4 Lieutenant   Posted: 9 days ago
Both Fairmile D boats 1/24 scale and are scratch built. They have both been about 6 years in operation. MGB623 is an MGB, flying the Norwegian flag and belongs to a good friend. Mine is MTB741. It is powered by 2 Graupner Speed 700 12V motors with NiMH batteries. The 6 pdrs and 20mm guns can rotate. It has a balsa planked hull and fibreglass skin. Decks and superstructure are also balsa. Guns are from tinplate and brass.

M.V. TEAKWOOD by Trillium Commander   Posted: 15 days ago
If I start a model using a fibreglass hull the first thing I do is bolt it down to a building board, just as RHBaker has done. Access to the bottom is not needed until painting, so the model can be worked on 'keel down'. I have two end boards that can be screwed on to the building board, and these allow me to lay the hull on its side, or upside down, and be stable, if I need to work on it that way. When the hull is ready for painting the holes in the hull are filled and sanded.

Huntsman fittings kit. by canabus Captain   Posted: 18 days ago
Hi Novagsio The only place that my help you out is Westbourne model.co.uk, but, they sell to full kit. May sell the fittings kit. The original handrails from my Precedent fibreglass hull are total rubbish, but, I only got with my second hand unfinished boat the air scoops. So I plan on making the hand bow rail and windscreen. My boat is in the BUILD BLOGS on the site. Canabus

HELP ME DECIDE PLEASE by terrymiff Apprentice   Posted: 29 days ago
The DF95 is too short at 950mm for IOM. I think that the Ragazza can squeeze into the IOM rules with a bit of tweaking. The supplied mast and sails fall between an A rig and a B rig in size. The mast is removable. If you decide to change the paintwork on a Ragazza you have two options. 1. Paint over the existing surface and add a bit more weight. 2. Strip the existing surface off and repaint on the bare fibreglass. Beware, this is not an easy job. The existing surface is VERY hard and takes a lot of sanding with very heavy sand paper to remove. Been there, done that. The Ragazza is a pretty boat and fun to sail but it will not stand up against the red hot competition IOMs.

What Gun? by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Half a rubber / plastic ball could mould the hemisphere using fibreglass or glass cloth and resin.Either inside or out. Out for a mould to make the finished article. Inside for the finished article. The barrel from successive gauges of brass and / or ali tubing to give the stepped effect . Regards John 😋👍

mystery yacht by basilsdad Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
hi all. I have purchased a yacht hull and deck as my next project from that well known auction site, but am struggling to find the maker or the name of the yacht?. it came complete with a fibreglass deck, measures 48" long 10" beam and 11" to keel bottom, I am sure some one out there knows what it is based on or who manufactured it. I have started the build and am going to loosely base it on the 1930 yacht enterprise, mainly the sail plan. have added a few photos if it helps thanks for any help. basilsdad

Graf Spee 1:20 !! All aboard ;-) by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Wayne I was not underestimating the capabilities, just pointing out that the hobby machines are small and not intended for printing large flat areas. Wood/Plasticard and Fibreglass are far better suited and much quicker for such jobs. If you really wanted such a job it would be better done professionally on an epoxy type industrial machine, might be a bit expensive, but then again at £20 per reel your costs must be escalating. Looking forward to the finished craft Dave

Glazing help by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Doug I used a trader (Steve Tranter- Model Boat Bits) to get the waterjet cutting done. The machine needs programming and I provided a spread sheet with the dimensions and they produced the file and did the cutting. As we were building two large models this was the only way we could get the project finished on time. I have been experimenting with crystal clear resin to produce portholes for a Confiance Class tug I am building. I made portholes out of brass on the lathe then filled the centre with the clear casting resin. I had bubbles in the initial attempt but by using a syringe and flicking the tube the bubbles all go to the top of the syringe and the result is to my liking. I do paint the portholes first. When dry I just glue in the fibreglass hull with epoxy. Mine are near the waterline and whilst cyano would work I don't trust it when wet as experienced with the Olympic. You could drill and fill your portholes with this, just need to place a blanking plate behind each porthole til the clear casting resin sets. I suspect this would be quicker than using acetate. Incidentally I used to cut my acetate portholes with a heated brass tube. I used a piece of stainless rod inside the tube to push the portholes out. Cheers Dave

fibre glass or not by reilly4 Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Fred, This all depends on the size and structure of the boat and the type of timber used as a skin. Fibreglass is generally used to strengthen and waterproof the boat.

waterproofing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi eric Welcome to the site. What type of boat have you bought? Is it a plastic, fibreglass or wood hull? Can you post a pic? We need a bit more detail please so we can give useful advice Dave