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>> Home > Tags > fibreglass

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Fibreglass the hull- continued by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 days ago
Now the Chine rubbing strakes are fitted, dry and filled and I have attended to the minor lumps and bumps the next job is to give another coat of resin, taking the issues of the first application into account I intend to apply a thin coat, this has the effect of filling in the pattern of the glass cloth. Another two days have passed and it’s time to do some rubbing down. I have found that the surface is very hard, more so than I recall some of the other fibre glass projects I have done but these have been using Polyester resin. It’s a first for epoxy, so is epoxy a better choice than Polyester? According to my mini research –  Epoxy is more versatile  Epoxy has fewer fumes  Epoxy is stronger  Epoxy shrinks less Conclusion Epoxy is the better choice for repairing/covering either wooden hulls or repairing fiberglass boats. It has excellent adhesive qualities, wets out fiberglass fabrics and it is tough. It has great thin film cure characteristics, cures in cool temperatures. After the first coat I wasn’t 100 % happy with the finish but I just thought that some dust had landed on the surface before the resin had dried, (this was proved not to be dust but because of the matting pattern still been visible it disguised the real problem) however this was easily sanded out with wet & dry. Now the hull and deck were looking really smooth with very little sign of the matting pattern it was time to give a final coat. I had decided to coat both the deck and the hull in one go so I mixed enough resin to do the lot. Starting with the deck I started to apply the resin but to may horror it started to pin prick all over the deck surface, panic, panic what was causing this? So was it the brush which I had previously washed out with cellulose thinners after applying the last batch of resin. I decided to remove the resin and use a new brush (I had 90 mins cure time to do this) so cleaning of with paper towel and finally with a wipe with thinners I started to apply resin again – but it happened again as I sat in despair I looked into the pot of resin wondering where to go next when I saw a film on the top of the remaining resin It was then I noticed a ridge in the cups side. It was the wax coating that had melted into the resin and subsequently appeared as pin pricks in the newly applied surface. At this realisation I removed all the resin again and took a breather hoping I had found the problem. Another day and a light rub down of the deck to make sure the surface is ready to receive its final coat. Resin weighed (in a glass container this time) and well mixed I started to apply again and fortunately it was OK and all surfaces were coated.

Wherry hull in GRP by kmbcsecretary Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Hi Dave thanks for your response, I do like the fin idea for the ballast plus there's no ugly bulp sticking out the bottom spoiling the lines. That's a good weight of fibreglass your using so it must be the light not doing you any favours in the picture making the hull look distorted. I have been researching the wherry for sometime now for a future build at 1.12 scale with clinker hull . Cheers Ron

Wherry hull in GRP by kmbcsecretary Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Hi Dave and welcome to the mad house, looking at the picture of the hull the hull sides look like they are collapsing, what weight of fibreglass are you using for the hull? What is the finished thickness of the hull? Is there a reason for the fin running the length of the hull ? Ron

Sea Commander restoration tips by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Get yourself a small pack of epoxy resin from ebay and seek out all slight delaminations of the plywood frames. Get the epoxy in those split bits and clamp them up. A clothes peg is sufficient if you're short of space. You can put a piece of cling film twixt peg and wood so the peg doesn't stick. Then use the rest of the epoxy to waterproof the insides. Be thorough and methodical. If you sand the model back to wood, use epoxy on that, either through fine model aircraft fibreglass cloth or just squeegee epoxy on all over with an old credit card. It goes much further and gets forced into the grain. It's not necessary to use GRP cloth on everything if it's well built. I have several over-50 year old model boats that are perfectly water tight with decent paint jobs (enamel, of course). Cheers, Martin

Fibreglass the hull by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
That looks painful, I will take your advice and do the deck and superstructure reinforcement as well as the nose. I've already done the roof and its certainly strengthened it really well.

Fibreglass the hull by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Michael. I was also a bit nervous when glassing the hull, I did a few trial pieces first to test the application method and the curing time but I actually found the process very straightforward and gave excellent results. Next time I'll use the faster curing hardener now I have the technique and confidence. I do regret not glassing the deck and superstructure as they would have benefited from a stronger surface. If it's not too late you might want to consider insetting a piece of steel or brass on the tip of the prow on the upper strake to protect from any accidental knocks. I managed to do that while carrying the boat through a doorway😡. It was quite easy to repair but a bit late for me to add a reinforcing plate around the nose. Keep up the great work. Robbob.

S10 by Will-I-Am Seaman   Posted: 1 month ago
[Score: 5/10] 36"/1500g S10 Twin Propellors (3 Blade) Direct Drive to a Graupner jumbo 540 (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (6v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Mtronik (10Amps) ESC - Comments: Built from a Vic Smeed plan in 1986, fibreglass hull, wood and plasticard and plasticard superstructure and various plastic, wood and metal fittings.

Fibreglass the hull by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
I purchased as recommended by Robbob the fibreglass package which consisted of 750g of epoxy resin and 250g of hardener, I also went for the 90min cure as this is the first time I have ever done a boat hull, I’ve done plenty of stranded fibre cowlings/air intakes etc. where you lay a gel coat first then stranded matting which is so different to laying a fine matt on its own. I also ordered some mixing sticks and throw away brushes. First I cut the matting to the slightly oversize for one of the side skins, then loosely taped the matt to the bottom skin and checked the coverage - and checked again then fold over to the opposite side, this then leaves the surface clear to apply the resin. Mixing the resin should be done accurately, so borrow the kitchen scales and here we go. I wasn’t sure how much to mix for a side skin but 25g of resin and 7.5g of hardener looks about right. So mix well and then brush onto the side skin, then I gently lifted over the matting and laid it on the skin and gently brushed the matting down, the matting is almost sucked onto the resin so minimal brushing is required to ensure a smooth surface A previous blog said that “Less is More” how true this is, the temptation to spread the remainder of the resin on to the already adhered matt is something to be avoided, however learn by my mistake as I did just that (only in a small area on one skin) leaving rather a lot of sanding later after the resin had fully cured as it leaves a rather lumpy surface. So onward and upwards the following three surfaces were relatively easy with only minor difficulty keeping the matting in close to the 90 degree angle between the keel and skin and I had to keep going back to it pressing it in with a steel rule until the resin started to go off but minimal resin left a surface that was flat and the weave of the glass matt can be clearly seen and felt but minimal sanding is required if at all. Then a further 2 coats of resin with sanding in between will leave a smooth surface ready for final preparation of painting. The final picture is of the roof that in a previous page I said to add strength the roof would need a coat of glass to reinforce the unsupported edges – To be continued

Unknown by Ballast Captain   Posted: 2 months ago
Looks like it could be a Thames Steam Tug, I'm not sure ! I have just acquired this lovely hull and I am not sure of it's build or origin. It is fibreglass and is 57" (1450mm) LOA X 14.5" (370mm) Beam. It has a very basically built superstructure which I don't think is appropriate. I would be very grateful if anyone has any idea what she is and any other information as to weather it was a kit that has been modified. I would love more information as to scale etc. Regards your shipmate. Ballast AKA Alan.

looking for a Mersey Ferry Model by 4clubs Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
The model is 1.48 scale scratch built on a fibreglass hull.Very detailed and accurate. Radio Controlled 2.4Ghz with working lights. She is 38 inches long For sale complete with the radio and batteries ready to sail.She is very weatherproof and can sail in rough conditions. The top is sealed on and released with four screws, no need to get inside to charge her up as there is a charging point at the top of the funnel. A display stand is also included I am asking £800. If you are interested you can come and have a look before committing yourself. email me direct on maxferrie@hotmail.com

Wianno Senior by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Progressing well. The removable roof above the cabin was just clamped; seats have been started; exterior of the hull will be fibreglassed and resin applied to the interior. I have received mast lengths from the Wianno Senior Association and the gaff and boom too. These will be made from Sitka Spruce later in the month.

MTB741 Fairmile D by reilly4 Captain   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 9/10] 58"/9000g MTB741 Fairmile D Capable of 9mph and a runtime of 65mins Twin Propellors (2 Blade S Type 40mm) Direct Drive to a Graupner 700BB 12V (2 Blade S Type) Powered by NiMH (12v) 9Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through MTroniks 30A Tio x 2 (10Amps) ESC - Comments: 1/24 Scale. Scratchbuilt from John Lambert Drgs & photos. It took 3.5 years. Plywood bulkheads, pine stringers & balsawood planking, then fibreglassed. Superstructure balsawood. Guns scratchbuilt from tinplate and brass. There are 2 motors and drive trains powered by 2 x 9cell NiMH D cells x 9Ah. 6 pdr guns rotate. 20mm oerlikon rotates and elevates. Radio is Futaba 2.4 GHz

Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by kmbcsecretary Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
The strengtheners for where the main mast will be fixed in place through the deck were glued in place with gorilla glue and fibreglassed in once the glue had gone of again this timber was an of cut that was to hand but this needed to be substantial as I would be using 12mm dowel for the main mast.

Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by kmbcsecretary Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
The next job was to fit the bulk heads and the deck shelf strips around the edges. I had some scrap pieces of 8mm OSB board so I used this for the bulk heads which were glued in place using gorilla glue then fibreglassed in once the glue had gone of. The shelf strips are 10mm square oak that were fixed 6mm below final deck hieght as I will be using 4mm ply for the sub deck followed by 2mm planking strips in walnut and beech.

Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by kmbcsecretary Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hello all this is my latest build of the Kingston mouldings Bristol pilot cutter 'mascotte' was purchased from a forum friend who no longer had time to build it. Sadly Kingston mouldings has now closed down. The first job was to glue the lead ballast into the bottom of the hull, this was done by using fibreglass resin then a couple of layers of fibreglass to seal the lead shot into the built in keel