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>> Home > Tags > fibresanding

fibresanding
funding
sanding
sanding sealer
fibre glass
fibreglass
glass fibre
fibresanding
Fiberglassing by Trillium Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
I should clarify my comment about 'no sanding' since it's not all 'plain sailing'. The first coat goes on easily and did not, and should not, require any sanding. For the second and subsequent coats, the fibreglass is essentially smooth and does not hold the resin in place so well. So these coats will be fine on a horizontal surface, but on a slope the resin will tend to run, and overlap on a hard edge. If you can ensure that you don't apply too much resin it's fine, but if you get runs, you'll have to sand.

Fiberglassing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi chugalone 100 Welcome to the site. You can fibreglass with different types of resin and cloth. If you are making and casting a fibreglass hull use fibreglass matting but to cover a hull lightweight fibreglass cloth is best. This is the type shown in the suggested video. Resin can be epoxy or polyester based but the latter is generally cheaper and in my opinion is easier to use and doesn't require thinning with alcohol. It is sold as layup resin and is supplied with hardener. Do follow the instructions re quantity of each part and mix thoroughly. If you are using epoxy Iso Propyl Alcohol is the type to use and is clear. The video shows using a brush to apply the resin and whilst this is OK it will give a very thick and heavy coating. I use the brush to apply and then a credit card sized piece of plasticard to spread the resin over and into the surface of the cloth resulting in an almost opaque finish with the weave showing through. You do need to have a good surface to work with as any imperfections will show when the resin hardens. Once dry give a light sanding all over to remove any imperfections and fill any holes with car body filler and sand smooth. I then apply a very thin top coat of the resin using a brush. When dry use wet and dry to sand and if necessary apply further thin coats until you have the finish you require. I have a local supplier and if you visit the site http://www.resin-supplies.co.uk/product.htm all the resins/cloths etc are listed. Using Google should bring up a local supplier. you do need to follow the safety instructions to protect yourself and wear appropriate protection for your hands, eyes and breathing, it is also best to apply in a well ventilated area and not on a cold day. The end result will be well worth the effort to keep your tug waterproof. You could also paint the resin over thye inside of the hull to protect the wood from any water that doeos find its way inside. Dave

Planking the hull. by sandkb Admiral   Posted: 3 months ago
Timber hull construction finished. Now the sanding and filling of imperfections to prepare for the next stage which will be the application of a fibreglass cloth skin to waterproof the hull and obtain a steel-plated like finish.

Planking the Hull by sandkb Admiral   Posted: 3 months ago
Various wood used ie, Ramin, Mahogani, Annegre, Veneer ply, Balsa. Strip planking is Obechi. Glues used: Cyno, Aliphatic wood glue where sanding required and where strength and waterproof glue is required I've used EpiGlue two pot Marine glue. The planking is used because of the many difficult shapes and curves of the hull construction. Once the sanding and shaping of the hull is completed the hull will be sheathed with a fibreglass cloth skin and resin then sanded smooth and spray painted replicating the steel hull of this vessel. Cheers, Kevin

Bridge Build by Pav403 Commander   Posted: 4 months ago
Hello all, I've been busy with the Bridge build, this has proved a little tricky as the forward structure is at a slight angle when not on the ship. I've used a combination of 1/8 ply and 0.75mm plastic sheet. I needed the ply in this section as this will be where I will have hull access for batteries and needed the strength. The walls of the upper structure are plastic sheet which I think have come out well. There is still more to add (look out wings at the rear of the bridge need walls etc) I can the start to connect this to the decking before adding finer details. Coming on slowly is the hull, I will spend a bit more time here over the coming weeks to get it ready for sanding and then fibreglass coating. Good luck with your builds. Dave

Moving again.. well, just a bit by ThatSinkingFeeling Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 4 months ago
So, having saved the kit from being put in the loft with the Xmas decorations and associated detritus Cordene is moving again. I've invested in a few additional hand tools, and also (thanks to those who helped with my propeller 101 question) in a shiny new brass prop, which is a lot more confidence-inspiring that the white metal one that came with the kit. Task now in hand is sanding off the excess fibreglass around the gunwales. To assist with achieving a straight edge where required I am applying lengths of PVC electricians tape as a guide to where to stop.