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>> Home > Tags > filler

filler
wood filler
filler
How do I resolve my varnish problem? by Inkoust Admiral   Posted: 7 days ago
Hello, I recommend grinding the whole body with fine sanding paper, then take the "LORD NELSON" pore filler and then re-grind it again. Subsequently, the final lacquer of the best brand. I have been treated like a wooden boat DIVA and already for 6 years on the water without any problems. What happened to you is that you used a bad lacquer that does not resist water. Two-component epoxy lacquers are also good for large yachts. I'm sending a link to the Czech site where the varnishes are designed for ship modellers. Just use the Gogle translator and the same merchandise you can get at the shop. Or on EBay. https://www.modelylodi.cz/Laky-a-plnice-c11_86_2.htm😉

Paint removal by onetenor Commander   Posted: 7 days ago
If the deck is also GRP the best bet is to plank it with fine veneer strips then varnish that. If it needs filler between the planks use a black one. Carbon black or similar added to the filler .Brown would also look smart.Artists powder paint could also be used and be cleaner to handle.Lite filler from B&Q is very good .Light and easy sanding and I believe slightly flexible so should not crack out.

Steering wheel by Midlife306 Commander   Posted: 7 days ago
Well it's getting nearer, a little bit of filler to dress then all I need is a chrome dome nut👍 The 9 little nuts were made with Milliput in some rubber molds I have, my first practice using them. Cheers Wayne

Jet Sprint Boat by sonar Admiral   Posted: 14 days ago
So If things are still not going well It may be better to take the moulding you have and work from that. Chuck all the moulding away . Flat board screw the hull down on the edges. Filler and sanding and keep going til your happy with it then finer and finer sandpaper then wet and dry and finished off with G3 polish then wax and pva then make the mould. Bearing in mind any blemishes in the mould will be in EVERY moulding taken.. Making the mould is not as hard as you think.

glass cloth or tissue? by John Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Hi Mark, I used the tights to repair a small leak inside the hull (the result of someone crashing into the hull at speed). At the time I did not have any glass cloth. I secured the edges first then the middle. I then used filler on the outside. So far the repair has not given me any trouble. John.

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by HoweGY177 Lieutenant   Posted: 19 days ago
Hi John, Suggest you sand as this will flatten the planking, no doubt each plank has curved slightly as the wood had dried out. Hoover out all the dust from the cracks and fill with a mahogany filler and re-flatten. The inside of the hull will also need varnishing to stop the wood drying out again. Would not advise wetting the planking to raise the grain as is normal practice as this might swell the wood and loose the filler. First use a good quality polyurathene varnish, brushed on but avoid runs, lightly sand to give a key before recoating. At this stage do not worry about the brush strokes showing. After at least 8 coats use wet and dry paper to sand the surface flat. Now apply a yacht varnish that does not dry so quickly and brush strokes will on the whole disappear. I suggest at least 3 coats to finish lightly wet and dry between coats. The more coats you give the deeper the shine. Use a good quality brush, a cheap brush drops hairs and does not give a smooth finish. If you look at my harbour and look at 'River Dance' you will see the finish this method can achieve. Good luck and hopes this helps. Vic

Finishing by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Hi Martin, Bin round the Talisker ? 😉 @stwdv; ignore what comes next, go to the last paragraph 😎 The scale effect (as I understand it) has nothing or little to do with shine! It refers to lightening / fading the colour to fool the brain into thinking an object is further away than it is, and therefore think it is larger. Look at any landscape photo or 'in real', hills or forests further away look lighter or more grey than the green ones in the foreground. There are pros and cons to both as Dave says. Cellulose is history, except from some nitrated cellulose solvents. In the car restoring days of my youth I remember getting crinkling if I used cellulose thinners from a different manufacturer than the paint 😡 @stwdv: if you do it veeeery carefully in very very thin misted layers (barely wet) you CAN put put a different paint on others BUT you need flat of and prime the old paint first. Pay a bit more for your primer (universal types) and ensure that the coating is absolutely complete and totally dry and hardened. Some combinations work better than others. But essentially it is better not to mix and match. It's essenentially the thinners that does the damage, less is more sometimes! Try to avoid cheap aerosols, paying a bit more avoids a lot of heartache and extra work, or throwing things in the bin 😡 They tend to have a fairly wide spread on the nozzles which wastes a lot of paint through over-spray. They also tend to be a bit thick and difficult to control the flow which can cause 'orange peeling or even runs and 'splodges' if the spray stutters. To counteract this one has to spray thinner; i.e. back off more from the object - which causes more over-spray. 🤔 The little spray cans made for modellers are much better than this in all respects than the cheap jumbo cans from the hardware store. Get a decent air brush for the big bits, then you can control the paint viscosity, flow and size and shape of the spray cone. takes a bit of practice but is worth it if you intend to build more models. But I suspect you wanted tips on the preparation! So let's cut to the chase😉 Sanding and filling are the buzz words. Checking the surface very lightly with your fingertips is much more sensitive and accurate than relying on your eyes. 🤓 When you think you got it right put on a THIN coat of primer (matched type to the finishing paint!) and you will soon see the spots you missed! So back to the filling and sanding. Use a very fine filler at this stage. Prime again and flat it off with 240 to 400 wet'ndry. Take off the residue with a damp sponge and dry!!! Go round this loop a few times and when eyes and finger tips agree you are ready for the finishing colour coats. Thin, let dry. Check for blemishes. Fix if necessary, flat off -> next coat. ALWAYS take note of paint can drying / hardening notes. Don't rush or you'll end up doing it again 😉 Hope this helps, bon chance mon ami 😎Doug PS my larger model (mostly warships!) I use resin based paints in half litre cans from the DIY shops and an airbrush. They are hard wearing, come in all colours (RAL codes) and finishes and are easy to mix and thin with turps or white spirit. They take the enamel for detailing with no problems. Snags: take longer to dry, but they are hard wearing and cheaper than millions of 14ml cans 👍

Using old motors by Westquay Captain   Posted: 25 days ago
Doug, that looks lovely. I can't guarantee the performance would be anything but sedate with the Target, but that kind of boat in the real world would rarely be seen exceeding about 10 knots if that. It's essentially a river boat. I would be inclined to keep with the scheme it has as it's nicely period with the off white. Maybe line the deck with a Rotring a la period too and veneer the coach house sides. I certainly wouldn't strip it as there'll be joints and filler and boring old plywood underneath. No, paint is the Aerokits look for sure Delamination needs only epoxy, either the repair and build stuff or the liquid a la West, SP, etc.. slide a knife in the delamination and convince some epoxy in, then lightly clamp it twixt layers of greaseproof paper (when the GF's out) or plastic bag or similar. I use Plastikard, but I was given a box of lasered off cuts by Ivan at the Vintage Boat Company. He's now sold out to SLEC who are even nearer where I live! Anyway I have plasticard in three thicknesses to waste. If you stroke the surface with a scriber, it will make a weird hollow noise if delaminated. If it is, make a cut, persuade the edges up and insinuate some epoxy into the crack you've made. Ain't nuttn. you can't repair. You should have seen the window frames in my house when I sold it. A festival of epoxy, firewood and P38 car filler. Surveyor passed it with barely a look. Reallygood paint saved the day. Stupid waster! 400 quid Mr. Client, chching! As for the extra gizmos, I'd ditch them to save weight and complexity. You might find a 3 blade prop works better, but I'm no expert there. Finally instead of "this belongs to", I'd simply name her Jessica, in a nice script. I hope that helps. Cheers, Martin

glass cloth or tissue? by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
Hi again! I used tissue on my destroyer (1.35m) with success, light and strong and minimal filling and sanding of lumps and bumps :-) Don't make the resin mix too thick and sticky or it won't soak in properly. Brush a thin mix into the wood to seal it first. Start at the keel and work up. Not too much hardener or it can go brittle, apart from going off too fast ;-( Shame to cover up all that lovely woodwork though 🤔 Can't you use a suitable coloured wood filler then varnish it? 'Wood' 😉 look wonderful. Cheer Doug 😎

Ketch Irene by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
First photo a hit & miss vent, cut to make gratings, painted streaky brown. This is not my idea, but its a good one. The hawser hole finished & the stern ready for filler & paint. Will finish hull paint before completing topgallant rail. Although I have a stand still using the pillow, as it makes a good pin cushion.

Fiberglassing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi chugalone 100 Welcome to the site. You can fibreglass with different types of resin and cloth. If you are making and casting a fibreglass hull use fibreglass matting but to cover a hull lightweight fibreglass cloth is best. This is the type shown in the suggested video. Resin can be epoxy or polyester based but the latter is generally cheaper and in my opinion is easier to use and doesn't require thinning with alcohol. It is sold as layup resin and is supplied with hardener. Do follow the instructions re quantity of each part and mix thoroughly. If you are using epoxy Iso Propyl Alcohol is the type to use and is clear. The video shows using a brush to apply the resin and whilst this is OK it will give a very thick and heavy coating. I use the brush to apply and then a credit card sized piece of plasticard to spread the resin over and into the surface of the cloth resulting in an almost opaque finish with the weave showing through. You do need to have a good surface to work with as any imperfections will show when the resin hardens. Once dry give a light sanding all over to remove any imperfections and fill any holes with car body filler and sand smooth. I then apply a very thin top coat of the resin using a brush. When dry use wet and dry to sand and if necessary apply further thin coats until you have the finish you require. I have a local supplier and if you visit the site http://www.resin-supplies.co.uk/product.htm all the resins/cloths etc are listed. Using Google should bring up a local supplier. you do need to follow the safety instructions to protect yourself and wear appropriate protection for your hands, eyes and breathing, it is also best to apply in a well ventilated area and not on a cold day. The end result will be well worth the effort to keep your tug waterproof. You could also paint the resin over thye inside of the hull to protect the wood from any water that doeos find its way inside. Dave

Big Blue by sonar Admiral   Posted: 3 months ago
quite a few years ago I was asked if I could make a model boat hull for a friends son. As then a laminator it was an easy job after making the plug to the approx specs asked for. I made the plug and mould then cast a test moulding asked if i could keep the test mould and was told by all means have one. The mould was handed over when completed and payment ect was made. The test moulding i just stuck in the loft Not knowing I would ever start modeling boats so much later in life. So Now I am into the model boats hobby. Here is the hull with twin outlets for the propshaft. And progress so far with the superstructure. Approx 51 inches long 17 inches wide and a depth of 11 inches. As I was paid to do the job nothing in the end belonged to me except the hull I was told I could have. In writing I may add.. Made a flat sheet of laminate and enclosed the whole hull on the top. Cut out an area for the superstructure and as you can see I have started a rough looking superstructure. I have no plans or drawings for this so it will go where ever it ends up I guess.. Apart from the hull I plan on using ALL recycled materials from our local tip. Paint .Plastic and everything else... The big idea apart from saving material from the tip is to make the model at the lowest possible cost. Motors and some other electrical parts will be removed and put into this model from the Ayton cross So all the parts will be transferable from model to model. Well thats the plan anyway. Guess I will have to wait and see how that goes later. Prop shafts props and rudders will be new so NOT replaceable. The timber so far a lump of 4x2 from the tip Free all cut down and sanded. The superstructure I have used a large fliptop plastic white bin from the tip again £1.00 Superglue bought from the local £1. shop. Filler and sanding paper I already have. So I have started it. I will update as I go along..

Wheelhouse roof detail....and a paint problem ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Because of the curvature of the wheelhouse roof the searchlight, mast, aerial and other fittings need some shaped wedges to sit on so that they sit vertically, this is particularly important for the searchlight as it is designed to rotate. I cut and shaped some plasticard for these and when I was happy with the angles I superglued them in place on the roof and used a small amount of filler to blend them into the roof profile. Similar spacers were made for the anchor where it sits on the forward cabin roof as well. After masking off the surrounding areas I sprayed a coat of Halfords white primer on the roofs and immediately noticed that the paint ‘crazed’ very badly for some unknown reason. I had used panel wipe to clean the roof before painting and was spraying over previous coats of the same primer so this was really disappointing to see 😭 I had to leave the paint to harden for a couple of days and set about stripping it back to the base coats as much as possible and then re-masked and sprayed again….only for the same thing to happen again 😡 This was despite pre-warming the can and shaking it thoroughly for the prescribed two minutes. To cut a long story short I discovered that the new can of white primer that I had recently purchased was faulty and it was spraying considerably more solvent/carrier than pigment and this heavy overload of solvent was the cause of the problem. Halfords replaced the paint without argument but I had to wait another couple of days before I could remove the paint and start over again for the third time. Happily the replacement paint was OK, the re-spray was successful and the final gloss coat is to a reasonable finish but the whole process set me back a couple of weekends and was a very frustrating experience 😞 An isolated case I’m sure but after previously stating that Halfords paint was OK, I now reserve my judgement and remain cautious with their paint, and I now do more test sprays just in case…..

Kingfisher progress by Grandpa Lieutenant   Posted: 4 months ago
Sanded off the K 3 and will apply filler tomorrow. Installed prop shaft assembly and short skew. Removal of extra threaded sectionpast prop will to done too. Must make rudder and install it, the rudder will extend out past the stern.

The fire monitors by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
The fire monitors are supplied in three pieces that need to be assembled, there is the pedestal, the main body & handles and the discharge nozzle (my descriptions, they may have a proper technical term!) 🤔 Before assembly all the parts were filed smooth, and cleaned with my ‘suede shoe brush’ to remove flash and blemishes and to give a key for subsequent paint. I felt that just glueing the main body and discharge nozzle together would not be sufficiently strong so I bored out the centre of each and inserted a 4mm threaded stud to pull them together, some threadlock on the stud and then some filler at the join produced a good result. The hole at the end of the discharge nozzle also looks more authentic. The pedestal was also bored out at both ends, the lower end for a 3mm stud and for a 2mm threaded stud at the upper end. The arms need to be carefully bent to the correct angle, you only really get one attempt at this as the white metal will not stand repeated bending and will probably fracture quite easily. I also added a small 'lever arm' feature to the bottom of the pedestal that appears in some photographs of the real item, this was finished with a hand turned brass knob. The finished parts were sprayed with one coat of grey etch primer, a coat of white primer and finally two coats of Halfords ‘Toolbox Red’ acrylic gloss. I assembled the two pieces when the paint had hardened and put a dab of red paint on the top fixing nut. The handle ends will also be detailed with some black paint or perhaps some black heat shrink.