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>> Home > Tags > fitting led

fitting led
boating
coating
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deck fittings
fitting the side skins
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fitting led
CG-40564 by circle43nautical Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 6 days ago
[Score: 9/10] 35"/4500g CG-40564 Capable of 15mph and a runtime of 45mins Twin Propellors (4 Blade 50mm) Direct Drive to a 775 JOHNSON-TYPE 6-12V (4 Blade) Powered by NiMH (8.4v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through HOBBYWING (15Amps) ESC - Comments: DUMAS 1:14 USCG 40' UTB. REPRESENTING US COAST GUARD UTILITY BOAT CG-40564, WHICH CAPSIZED DURING A RESCUE ATTEMPT ON THE COLUMBIA RIVER BAR ON 17 JAN 1961. HER CREW WAS FORTUNATELY RESCUED. SHE WAS ASSISTING CG-52301, A 52' TYPE F WOODEN MLB, WHICH FOUNDERED WITH THE LOSS OF ALL HANDS. IT REMAINS THE WORST SMALL BOAT RESCUE DISASTER IN COAST GUARD HISTORY. THIS IS AN UNUSUAL SCALE BALSA PLANK-ON, COVERED BY 2 OZ FIBERGLASS. I USED MINWAX POLYURETHANE FOR AN ALTERNATE TO RESIN, WHICH TURNED OUT WELL, AND CAN BE DONE WITH MINIMAL VENTILATION. WITH BIRCH PLY DECK & CABINS, 1/8" SCRIBED SHEATHING COVERS THE DECK BOW TO STERN AND MAHOGANY TRIM LEFTOVER FROM ANOTHER DUMAS KIT IN MY SCALE SHIPYARD. STOCK D/C FITTINGS WITH SOME SUPPLEMENTAL PREMADE AND HANDMADE ITEMS. SHE FEATURES TWIN RABOESCH 4-BLADE WIDE FLUKE WHEELS AND MATCHING RUDDERS; WORKING HATCHES WITH STOWAGE AREA FOR ANCHOR & TOWLINE, LIGHTHOUSE 9V LED NAV LIGHTS AND FLASHING LED LAW ENFORCEMENT BLUE LIGHT (RC CONTROLLED). I'M ADDING A MOUNT FOR A SCALE BROWNING M2 50 CAL THAT I WAS ABLE TO PRODUCE ON MY 3D PRINTER. THAT'S AN ADVENTURE IN ITSELF. THIS WAS MY FIRST REAL PLANK ON BULKHEAD, AND BALSAWOOD CAN BE A LIL TRICKY, BUT WILL ALWAYS BE THE STANDARD OF WHICH I COMPARE ALL MY SUBSEQUENT BUILDS. MY FATHER BUILT RC AIRCRAFT, AND ALWAYS PREACHED THAT YOU SHOULD OVERBUILD IN ORDER TO SURVIVE A CRACK-UP AND FLY ANOTHER DAY! THAT'S MY CREED WITH BOATS. OVERBUILD!!! THANK YOU DAD!

USCG CG-44345 by circle43nautical Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 6 days ago
[Score: 8/10] 28"/1400g USCG CG-44345 Capable of 14mph and a runtime of 45mins Twin Propellors (3 Blade 40mm) Direct Drive to a MAB 540 (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (8.4v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through HOBBYWING (10Amps) ESC - Comments: VINTAGE BILLING BOATS (MY FIRST RC ENDEAVOR 1989) 1:20 US COAST GUARD 44' MOTOR LIFEBOAT. ABS HULL & DECK WITH PLYWOOD CABINS. ALL STOCK RUNNING HARDWARE AND FITTINGS. I'M CURRENTLY OVERHAULING HER, HULL IS DECORATED AND MARKED WITH NEW DECALS. THE ORIG KIT WAS CG-44329, WHICH SAILED OUT OF US COAST GUARD LIFEBOAT STATION MANASQUAN INLET, NJ. I CHANGED THE HULL NUMBER AND RELOCATED HER TO USCG LIFEBOAT STATION LUDINGTON, MI., WHICH WAS MY DREAM STATION WHEN I WAS A PROUD US COAST GUARDSMAN, '80-86. THERE WERE 110 OF THESE MLB'S BUILT BY THE COAST GUARD YARD IN CURTIS BAY, MD, AND THE DESIGN WAS SO SUCCESSFUL, IT WAS DUPLICATED BY THE RNLI AND STILL IN SERVICE TODAY. THERE ARE EVEN A COUPLE FOR SALE THE LAST TIME I CHECKED. OTHER THAN THE 40' UTB, THE 44 IS MY FAVORITE COASTAL RESCUE CRAFT.

Motor problem by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Hi Richard, that lead acid is way too big and heavy. I Remember going on hols as a kid, car was loaded up, all family, roofrack, deck chairs, tent and so on, and Dads old Moggie Traveller would barely climb the Welsh hills! Same here, its just dead weight, ideal for a tug etc, no speed required, and ballast needed. This boat wasn't any slouch in its day, As Havelock says, it was originally built as a ic powered model so could stand being heavy. To achieve balance, its a matter of moving things around, not adding, so just move things forward, you will be surprised how the weight increases once you start adding Deck clutter, fittings and so on. Lightweight, is good. Your comment, stood up in the water at half throttle isn't going fast, its just bad weight displacement causing the bow tyo be too high. That setup would never have been that fast, the motor/battery combo will never cause a heavy ply boat to be going that fast its standing on end Couple of things to consider. Your nimhs, how many times have these been cycled, and what sort of charger are you using? A reasonable charger will give the information, if I know what you are using, Ill advise accordingly as you might not be getting the best from these batteries what prop are you on Think of an rc plane (if you fly them its easier) If the cog is too far back, the nose is pitching up, and its almost impossible to control, it almost porpoises in the air, and is very bad. COG is vital on a rc plane, nose heavy is better, only because its more controllable. COG is equally important with a boat, but harder to see the implications, the hull will give us false info, such as if the bow is up its on the plane, no, not necessarily, its not planing due to speed, its just out of balance. Shifting the weight radically will let you see this, sorry for the ramble, Wish you where closer to me I would love to help hands on👍 Ive tried to find a suitable video of my Huntman to display what I'm rambling on about. This video is poor quality, but it displays that boat moving very fast (25mph with on board data logger) but look how flat it is, its planning, as the forward 1/3 of the hull is out of the water, but its not standing on its tail, this is because its balanced. You boat is pretty similar in design to this so whilst you wont want to go this fast, the picture should look the same. This Huntsman weighs 6kg with batteries (lipos, you will NEVER get a nimh or lead acid to do this) and is 4 foot long, so quite a heavy old girl first constructed as an IC model in the early 70's. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5-YmmElIfk&t=34s and here is a picture of my 3 foot aerokits fireboat, bow up, is it planing, no, its way out of balance, it wasnt actaully going that fast Hope that helps Paul

Motor problem by RichardSReade Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 13 days ago
Thank you gents, I will get a bigger motor and reduce the prop size as I do not want it any faster than it is, also a smaller prop as everyone has said will reduce the power drained from the battery, I have a water scoop and tubing so will be fitting that today and will fit a water jacket around the motor, also I am thinking weighing the lead weight fitted in the compartment behind the motor and replace some or all of it and fit a 12 volt 7 amph sealed lead acid battery, presumably this will last longer than the present batteries fitted, or will it?

Aero Kit - Sea Queen by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Andy Welcome to the site. There are many posts re building and fitting out Sea Queens on the site. You can search and browse. The boats in Harbour section will alsos give yousi details of the motor/prop/battery set up. I have an original Aerokits version and in my 48" Sea Queen I use a brushless 42 size 850Kv water cooled motor of 700 watts and it is happy driving a Prop Shop prop of 42mm at 45 amp on full throttle. Power is from an 11.1v Lipo of at least 2200 mA but Nimhs would work, just not as fast and less duration.

Removing The Deck by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Neil, I heartily second all of what Dave has written ESPECIALLY NOT CHARGING IN THE HULL! 😡 I also considered fitting the battery across the hull but came to the conclusions that it was too high and impossible to remove for charging, so I settled for between the shafts as Jarvo did. I have also dumped the smoke idea, my older version Southampton does not have this. Instead I will concentrate more on sound, lighting and possibly a working winch. As Dave says slow down! Get the basics working and the ship sailing first. THEN you will know how much freeboard, and space(!) you have left for the special effects. Cheers Doug 😎

Fittings and finishing by Novagsi0 Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Have been making steady progress on the Huntsman. Few additional fitting I acquired and me mom has been busy knitting boat fenders front and for the sides. Amazing she can almost knit one as faster than I can chamfer a cork in the lathe to fill it with. (pictures attached). I'm not sure the masking tape she attached them will cope with the speed and the wet. I guess I need to secure then with some brass cleats or posts. My next Job. Also attached the windscreen not as much trouble as I thought. Radio is in and the Torpedo 850 motor installed.

Hobby Engine 'Richardson' Tug Upgrade by NPJ Captain   Posted: 1 month ago
This is the beginning of a ‘diary’ of events. It involves a small Tug, the Hobby Engine Richardson and my attempts to improve its performance. This is my first attempt at such a project and would not have been possible without the assistance of certain members of this site. For those not familiar with this model here are the basic details......... Pic1&2 At 1/32 scale ( 1 metre = 31.25mm; 1 inch = 2 feet 8 inches), it has a Length of 54cm (21.25 inches) beam 17cm (6.75inches) height to radio aerial top 37cm (14.5inches) and weight at 1924grams (4.5 lbs) with standard battery and fittings. It comes with 2.4 digital radio, 7.2v 800mAh rechargeable battery and charger. Features include:- Twin 280 motors, functioning internal lights, external lights, smoke and horn. So some (such as Rallyst) have quite rightly said “Why change it”? My answer is that I can never ‘leave well alone’ , that I found the transmitter controls rather ‘rough’, the battery life too short, the horn sound very weak and the smoke almost non existent. Plus the fact that it has been reported elsewhere that the steering when going astern was very hit and miss. So I started to take it apart! Pic3 It is easy to remove the Wheelhouse by sliding the dark grey locker at the front of the wheelhouse/bridge and the stairway. Once the unit is released, the white electrics connector underneath can be difficult and needs very gentle prising with a small screw driver. The other two plugs come easily. This is where members ‘Jarvo’ and ‘RNinMunich’ came to my aid............. However, some of the screws are obvious but others have been well hidden. They are to be found under some of the fittings on the deck. Pic4,5,6,7. The next move will be to remove the deck, but that is for next week. What am I hoping to achieve.....well from zero knowledge I would like to have engine sound connected to the throttle control, good horn sound, better control of steering when going astern and a six channel receiver with new transmitter that feels good to use!

SCRATCH FISHING BOAT by basilsdad Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
I have for sale my model fishing boat which was scratch built from a model boat magazine plan, forgot who designed it though. it is built from balsa for the hull sides covered in a pair of the bosses tights before sealing and painting.The stern and deck are ply then painted to seal. all the deck and cabin fittings are scratch built from photos found on line. it is quite heavy about 10Lb of lead if I remember correctly, the length is 30" by 16" to keel bottom and beam 9", fitted with a 12v to 14V motor, 70 mm prop. Batteries and 320 amp fan cooled speed controller included, currently running off 12v 6 amp batteries. space needed for new project £150 or reasonable offers collection from Lincoln would be advisable due to size and weight. But could arrange delivery if required.

Display stand and transport case. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Simply magnificent, museum+ quality, and too good to hide in a museum 👍👍👍 I too have learned much about fixtures and fittings from following your immaculate blog Would love to know where the wheeled flight case came from, could help me with my 4 and 5 foot ships!! Cheers Doug 😎

Secure the hatches and raise the flags ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Having spent so much time adding fittings and detail to the removable cabin roofs and hatches the last thing I want is for them to be dislodged and see them sink without trace 😱! Having used some amazingly strong neodymium magnets to hold the foam tanks securely in the rear well I was confident that they would be more than powerful enough to hold the various roofs and hatches in place so I scoured eBay for some suitable sizes and shapes. I settled on two sizes, 25x6x3mm and 12x6x3mm and ordered 10 of each, more than I need but so useful to have in the bits box. A word of caution with these magnets, always slide them apart and avoid letting them crash together as the impact can easily break them into pieces, as I discovered. Thankfully I have some spares ! For the engine roof magnets I made a couple of small plywood brackets into which the larger magnets are fixed with epoxy and these were in turn epoxied onto the inside faces of the engine room walls. The mating magnets were let into the underside of the roof frame and firmly glued in place after double checking the mating polarity and orientation. An identical method was used for the forward cabin roof but using the smaller magnets. For the removable panel in the centre section over the motor I used a single pair of small magnets on the rear edge only as the front of this panel is held under the cabin door in a rebated part of the floor that forms the threshold of the door. I had to fit a small brass handle in the rear of this panel so that I could pull the panel up and away as there is no other means of doing so without, I made a ‘hook tool’ from some brass wire for this purpose. The floor panel in the rear cockpit is secured on it’s rear edge by a pair of the larger magnets, the forward edge being held down by the towing hook bracing stays. The removable hatch in the rear cockpit floor was also fitted with two pairs of the smaller magnets let into the underside of the hatch and the hatch framing of the floor. One of the brass handles that I that had previously set into the hatch was bent up slightly so that I could use my brass ‘hook tool’ to release it from the magnets hold. So now all the roofs and hatches are firmly secured by the concealed magnets and are easily removable without any fiddly catches or fixings and now there’s now very little chance of them coming adrift and disappearing! The final finishing detail are the two RAF ensigns, one on the mast and one on the stern flagstaff. The ensigns were made by Mike Allsop Scale Flags & Ensigns who was very helpful and advised me on the most suitable sizes for the 1:12 scale of my boat. His flags are extremely well made, excellent value for money and look very realistic when flying and fluttering !! Mike can be contacted at: scaleflags@outlook.com or by telephone on 01476 573331 They are hand made from a fine and flexible silk cloth that behaves like a real flag even in a slight breeze and are easy to fix with diluted PVA glue. The smaller flag was fitted to the lanyard on the mast as described in the supplied instruction sheet. The ensign on the stern flagstaff was very carefully formed and glued so that the flag was not fixed in one place and could rotate around the shaft of the flagstaff as this piece screws into a brass fitting on the rear deck and this will ensure that it will always find it’s own position. A small brass ring was formed and glued to the flagstaff below the ensign so it would always stay at the top and not slip down. So, all hatches battened down, flags raised and ready for action. That’s just about everything finished now barring any trimming and ballasting required and is ready for it’s maiden voyage. I hope that all of you that have been following my blog have had as much enjoyment reading about my build as I have had in the building and finishing process 😁 And a big thank you to all that have contributed so much with encouraging comments, suggestions and advice 👏 😍

Building a deck by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 5 months ago
I began laying the deck on April 5th. It had snowed as recently as the week before, but it finally warmed up enough to use glue. The strips were cut to 6-5/8" length, about 20' in 1:36 scale. I used a black marker on two opposite sides to represent the pitch in the seams. The deck was laid in a 5-plank pattern to mix up the butt-joints as much as I could. My research on her decking found she's had various styles and plank widths over her life. The earliest photo showing her deck that I could find, showed it straight planked with 7 or 8" wide boards based on the number of planks between her waterway and the main hatch coaming. Her waterway logs seem to be placed ON the decking, as there's no margin planks or joggling - even today. The planking was set with gel CA. Gorilla sells it in a nice bottle with a metal pin in the cap to keep the spout open. It would up taking 3 of these bottles to complete the deck. The planks are cut at a 45 on the ends along the fore and aft access hatches, to try and hide this seam as much as possible. Once the deck was down, I scraped it. The glue is more resistant than the basswood is, so sanding would have scalloped the wood between seams. Scraping makes everything level. Some lite sanding, more to polish than remove anything, was done last. I had planned to stain the deck a very light grayish tint, but an active naval vessel gets holy-stoned regularly and wouldn't be gray as the ships that sit at a dock today are. In all it took 455 pieces to complete the deck and there wasn't any scrap longer than 1 inch left over. In all I have 3/4" deck beams, 1/4" plywood, a layer of 4oz cloth and resin, and a 3/16" basswood deck - I don't recall why I designed it so heavy, but it certainly doesn't hurt the model at all, and I think the 3/16" square strip will prove to have been easier to set than the 1/16" x 1/4" planks Pride and Macedonian will get. The deck go a coat of water-based satin poly, and I stared working on hatch coamings, cap log, and waterways. The cabin skylight and two hatched forward of it, including the capstan, and all combined into one hatch where the battery is accessed, and which hides the aft ballast rod and main power switch. The cap logs Are 1/2" wide x 1/4" tall basswood that was tren'led, glued, and copper nailed, onto the deck, flush with the outside of the hull covering this seam completely. The the angled wood waterways were installed around the inside of the cap log, and the deck got a coat of oil-based satin poly. This actually leeched in and made the marker seams bleed a little. In hind sight, I think I'll go with paint over marker for seams in the future. The coamings got painted black. I'm not sure why the Navy painted deck fittings black. It was even common to paint to top surfaces of tops black. I wonder how many injuries and losses this cost the navy that white paint would have prevented. Anyway... Constellation didn't have "solid" bulwarks, but rather she had hammock irons bolted to her cap log. These were removed when Baltimore tried to pass her off as a frigate and tossed in the bilge. When the ship was restored as a sloop of war, they found all but one. These irons are designed to have wooden rails at their tops, inboard and out, and have holes so several lines can be run through them. The Navy in it's wisdom though, decided to wainscot them to appear as solid bulwarks, despite the additional splinter hazard that would be in battle. I wasn't making all those metal stanchions just to hide them under wood and tarps, so I made wood blocks sheathed in sheet bass, scribed to look like vertical wainscotting. It was the end of April by now, and the Baltimore Port Expo was in two weeks. I wanted to have hammocks in the bulwarks, as she appears in the portrait, but there was no time to figure this out, so I layered on some balsa and shaped it so it looked like tarps were laid over the hammocks. When I figure out how I'll represent the stowed hammocks, I can pull the balsa off easily enough. The bulwarks on, I made some fittings for the spencer masts; installed the eye bolts at the base of the masts; made some bollards (or whatever name they gave those posts), made and installed the catheads, which are laminated 1/16" basswood. I then started setting up a jury rig and her controls so she could sail at the Port Expo. I set her t'gallants and all three heads'ls this time around. By the night before the Expo, she was ready to go.

The suction hoses – part 3. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
The remaining hose fittings are the male & female connectors and fortunately require nothing more than drilling to take the four short brass ‘turning handles’ which were soft soldered in place and then filed to length. The suction hoses themselves proved far more difficult to make to a satisfactory standard and after several experiments with different gauges of copper, steel and stainless steel wire I found a 1.25mm galvanised ‘garden wire’ that proved malleable enough to be formed into a long coil spring that when covered with some black heat shrink tube looked OK. I used a length of 8mm diameter aluminium tube as a former and hand wound the galvanised wire tightly around the tube to form a spring. This was a painful process, quite literally, and caused blisters on my thumb and forefingers despite wearing protective gloves 😭 The springs were then stretched out on the rod to space the coils evenly and then drawn through the heat shrink tube, and then a heat gun used to shrink down the tube onto the springs. While the newly formed hoses were still warm and pliable I put them on a former with the correct curvature and applied a little more heat and then left them to cool and set. The hoses were made over length so that, when finished, I could trim them to the correct lengths to fit into the rear well of the boat with the fittings attached. See part 4 for the final assembly...coming soon.

3D printing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi Doug No I use silicon to make my moulds and Fast cast resin for the castings. The beauty of the 3D is the speed with which I can get an original to make my moulds. Also I can then rescale to the correct dimensions for a different model. Add to that the fact that I can add lots of fine detail that may be challenging if I was making each original. Technological advances are great but it does tend to make us lazy and lose the some of the skills we have developed. I do admire the true scale modellers who make all their own fittings and there are many on this site who produce stunning models from whatever materials they can find. It is good to see Build Blogs that cover a multitude of techniques and skills and it is always interesting to see how others have approached and tackled their project. Such knowledge is fast disappearing and it is sites like this where members share their projects that keep the hobby alive. Dave

The suction hoses – part 2. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
The next piece I tackled was the bulkhead connector to which the assembled hose is connected. This is not a particularly complex piece but I had to engineer it’s attachment to the bulkhead to allow for easy removal. As with the suction pickup I added four short pieces of brass as turning handles to the ‘cover cap’ for the want of a better description, this cap would be undone to reveal the male connector of the pump intake and the cap would have a retaining chain. This chain would presumably be attached to the bulkhead in some way but I needed it to attach to the base of the fitting. I drilled a hole through the spigot on the cover cap and formed a loop from some brass wire for the chain attachment. Similarly I drilled the base and made another wire loop for the chain attachment there. I didn’t have any suitable chain so I thought I would have a go at making some by winding about 20 turns of brass wire around a piece of thin brass rod which I then cut through lengthwise with a hacksaw to produce some brass loops. These loops were then flattened, linked and closed to form the chain and a short length of the finished chain attached to the fitting. Very fiddly work and a test of the eyesight 🤓 As mentioned, I needed to make the fitting easily removable without using screws or a threaded stud as it needs to be removed without tools to allow the cockpit floor to be lifted out. To achieve this I put a 3mm thread into the rear of the fitting and then threaded a piece of 3mm brass rod to go into that. I made a retainer to go into the bulkhead that would provide a friction fit for the hose connector. This was made from a short length of 3mm I/D brass tube set into another short supporting piece of 4mm I/D tube and a piece of 14 swg brass plate, all the parts were silver soldered together with the 3mm tube protruding the plate by the thickness of the bulkhead. The 3mm tube was cut crossways to form some ‘fingers’ that will grip the 3mm shaft of the fitting. To provide extra grip I used a piece of rubber sleeve and a small pipe clip over the ‘fingers’. This piece was glued into a 4mm hole in the bulkhead with the end of the tube flush with the bulkhead. The hose connecter is then pushed into this retainer with a firm friction grip but is easily removed without any tools. Definitely getting the hang of working with brass now 😁 Still not inclined to by a lathe though 😜 The remaining fittings should be a lot easier...I hope.