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>> Home > Tags > fitting led

fitting led
boating
coating
contra rotating
deck fittings
fitting the side skins
fittings
hull plating
lighting
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fitting led
Grimmershorn II by CB90 Commander   Posted: 17 days ago
[Score: 5/10] 40"/5000g Grimmershorn II Capable of 7mph and a runtime of 60mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 70mm) Direct Drive to a 950 (3 Blade) Powered by Lead Acid (12v) 12Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through 15A 24v (5Amps) ESC - Comments: The Motor vessel 'Grimmershorn' was built in 1956/57 by Hansa Stahlund Schiffbau GmbH at Koln-Deutz for the Waterways and Shipping Administration at Cuxhaven.Her Daimler-Benz four stroke diesel engine had an output of 500hp. permitting a speed of 11.5 knots. The model hull and deck are vacuum formed ABS, timber work of precision cut ply, 2 full size plan sheets and a construction manual along with a fittings pack complete this kit. Technical Data Scale: 1:20 Length: 1038mm Beam 305mm The Grimmershorn was the second major kit I purchased from a model shop on the outskirts of Harlow in Essex back in the 1980s. The Krik kit is still produced and sold today. My build was a slow and lost enthusiasm so after completing the hull, deck, motor and bow thruster installation I gave the boat to my father in-law who completed the superstructure and sailed the boat for a while, eventually the boat was given back to me when the father in-law moved house. I then repaired the rudder, added a moving radar, a adjustable water cannon and pump also various extra fittings such as a detailed life raft and crane, buoys and captain figure. thus renamed the boat as Grimmershorn II a Search and rescue fire boat.

Cabin roof mechanism by mturpin013 Admiral   Posted: 1 month ago
As I mentioned in a previous post I want to put some detail into the cabin and in order to do this I wanted the roof to open so that the detail can be seen and also giving good access for construction and detailing. So I looked at various lifting lever systems and the one which gave greatest access and took minimal room was a simple parallel bar mechanism. I first made a card model to ensure it worked before investing a lot of work in making the real thing. I used some brass plate cut into 3 x 2mm strips and using 10BA fastenings I constructed the levers and securing plates. Before fitting the mechanism and cutting any roof trusses I tried the mechanism using the brass bars and a card roof replica to once again prove its operation. I then added further cross beams to ensure the roof frame stays stable when the roof is lifted and that the roof skins had sufficient support when closed. All through this design and make session the cabin frame was only secured by temporary pins and had and no roof skins fitted, this enabled it to be lifted off in one piece whilst working on the frame. Now the mechanism works the cabin detail can be finished before finally fitting the roof skins.

Decks by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Templates were made out of cardboard, good job that I like Weetabix, a bit of messing about but eventually I got a good fit, these were transferred onto the 3mm ply for the deck. Before fitting the deck the ply was given a couple of coats of Z-Poxy finishing resin rubbing down in-between coats, this filled in the grain ready for painting and also made it waterproof. After the glue had dried the deck and bulwark were given a coat of primere, then two coats of the finishing colour. After a week of the paint left to harden the coamings (if that's the right spelling) were glued in place.

Skinning the hull (bottom) by mturpin013 Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
The boat has to be placed upside down so first thing to do is to modify the base board so the hull is firm to be able to do any final trimming. Before the skins are fitted the bow areas have to be sealed being careful not to seal the parts which are to be glued The instructions say that the lower skins are fitted first and as they are 6mm oversize this allows for trimming to achieve a good fit. After some time I got a fit I was happy with from the stern to the start of the bow curve so at this point I pinned the skin at the B2,3,4,5 leaving enough material to trim to the bow curve prior to bending . The bending was done simply by soaking in hot water for 5 - 7 mins and then forming around a suitable paint tin and left overnight to dry. Before fitting I decided to trim the skin at the front bow area where it has a butt joint with the side skins, easier than trying to cut it out after it had been glued. Point to note was that while the bending was being carried out, I also bent he side skins as well. Having pre drilled all the holes for the pins and ensured the fit is as good as I can get I can now epoxy the first skin on.

Rudder, water pickup and skeg by mturpin013 Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
At this point I decided to fit the rudder tube, water pick up and skeg. I was able to mount the boat in the machine vice by gripping the keel; this ensured that the holes are drilled absolutely true and square, 2 x 8mm holes are needed to take both the rudder tube and water scoop. I purchased the rudder assembly from a well-known supplier but I didn’t like any of the proprietary water scoop tubes on offer so decided to make my own. Whilst the boat is in the vice I also decided to machine the slot for the skeg to fit in. This required drilling a series of 2mm holes and then opening them up into a slot using a long series slot drill again giving an accurate slot which the skeg can locate into. Water scoop Having dealt with the woodwork, I turned my attention to metalwork. To bend the ¼” brass tube successfully it has to be annealed, (cherry red and quenched in water), then inserting a tight fitting spring inside the tube to stop any kinking I gently pressed it round a former to the correct shape. Springs removed I filed the end to the correct angle which gives an oval opening, but the end didn’t look finished, so I machined a thin spacer and then squashed it to suit the oval end and silver soldered it to the end of the tube, this gives a much better visual appearance.

When to paint bits? by veganhouse Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
thank Dave - there are HUGE access covers both at the front and rear of the tug, so not too worried about aligning motors & prop shaft. the only cramped space as you will eventually see is when fitting a bow thruster.... but more of that in due course ( the blog is catching up with th build!) Space inside the 1st tug was OK till the deck was sealed in place, then it was really tight!

46" Firefloat What Motor/Battery by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi John, you might now be scratching your head, and wishing you have not asked the original question! This seems to be a common issue, as the boating community is light years behind the other disciplines, rc cars, planes helis and so on, its probably due to the facts general boating doesnt really need the later generation technology, the average boater age is probably higher than the other disciplines so budgeting might be an issue, and there is less younger blood in the clubs to explain the lipo/brushless etc. We see posts with a load of numbers, specs, warnings etc, its enough to put people off. Im a big fan of brushless/lipo/ 2.4 etc, been doing it for years, its cheaper and more efficient (once you have the basics) but for the average guy, who just wants to spend an easy afternoon at the local lake gently cruising around, brushed motors, nimhs batteries, even lead acid, will do the job👍 Your 4 foot ply boat, once painted, with fittings, will be heavy, I know, I own one. Those 600 motors are not big enough, they are better suited to the smaller 3 foot boat, then, pushing them with a 6v lead acid, just cant do it. The battery will be screaming HELP!! I started 15 years back exactly the same, 600 motor, 6v battery, massive 50mm prop, I knew no better and took advise from people who didnt know what they were talking about😡, remember those gold hi tech speed controllers!! I had one, it melted, literally melted on the first use😭 Get 700 size motors, they will need to be water cooled, as mentioned by jarvo, the nominal voltage or below isnt good enough, power them at the max voltage. Brushed means you can use one apropriate esc, look out for electronize (are they still in existance?) or mtroniks, preferably use nimhs batteries over lead acid with a high mah. If after all this you want to venture into lipos and brushless motors, go to a club, spot a boat that is similar in size to yours, if you like the performance talk to the owner and gain experience and knowledge that way, it will save money, lost time and a lot of disappointment, I have been there so feel your pain. I say I would never go back to brushed motors and none lipo batteries, but I always want silly speed, not runtime, after 15 minutes Ive had enough and am bored. Rambling over! My 4 foot boat is twin brushless and uses 4 lipo 5000mah cells per motor, it will do 25mph for 15 mins, then I go home😁 Message is, you can get a "reasonable" performance from brushed motors, with the correct batteries, right props, but weight is the enemy. Looks lie you are at Biddulph, get onto Dave M a moderator on here, and arrange to go over to see the crewe and district boys on one of their sailing days, take your boat with you, they will help👍

More Bulkheads by mturpin013 Admiral   Posted: 3 months ago
All the bulkhead parts are made ready for assembly. I decided at this point modify CF2 and B2. B2 to enable easy access for further detailing of the cabin at a later stage and CF2 I cut out what will be the door opening into the cockpit. Each of the bulkheads had 2 x 12 mm holes drilled just below deck level for future wiring runs; they also needed support to secure them at 90 degrees so I made a number of right angle squares to support them squarely and at equal height at each side, these were secured with a temporary brass pin. The spacing at the keel was pre-determined when building the keel components, however the tops need correct spacing by dry fitting the cabin sides and just checking that each side measures the same height, finally the back end of the keel needs supporting to keep everything square. Each of the cabin sides and bulkheads can now be dismantled and reassembled with epoxy resin. NOTE at this stage only the bulkheads are epoxied to the keel, the cabin sides and CF2 are only there to ensure the bulkheads are square and correctly spaced at this stage.

Bulkhead by mturpin013 Admiral   Posted: 3 months ago
Bulkhead Time to fit the B1 bulkhead, at this point I was advised (by a well-known crash tender builder, more about him later) that I should dry fit the entire front end and to chamfer the appropriate parts prior to final assembly leaving only final trimming when fitting the skins (a good call). Again keeping all components square, vertical and level by using height gauges squares etc. they are pre-drilled and temporally pinned to ensure that they fit correctly. Its then all taken apart before final assembly with epoxy and pushing the brass pins fully home and clamped where required.

The Vosper 46” RAF Crash Tender Kit By Vintage Model Works by Lyle Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
Dear Modellers and builders of the Vintage Model Works kit series. You will find my earlier pictures and various writings on the original earlier postings by me in OZ of my still some 30/plus years Crash Boat in which I wore out several I/C motors and my girl still runs in Salt Water at the local LAKE ILLAWARRA in New South Wales and you are somewhat fortunate with ready made fittings. I did not ever know of the "page" ( wish I had a copy ) on your wall of the rear well of fire hose details and fittings , wow what a bonus, as a colonial had several years till Peter Dimberline and I had contact and he helped me to authenticate my vessel. The ESSENTIAL secret of the Crash Boat is the spray rails. So many look toy in the videos and TOOOOOOO fast . The spray rails are doubled at width protruding from the hull and lesser at the point of "rise of the wood " towards the upper bow point. The depth is not too critical at a bit of about an eighth of an inch thickness or a bit thinner for the whole length as you do not want to see a "thick log ", rather again it is the width rather than depth. I know I have written on this before on this webb site in the past. The turns thus on the go become when starting on and STAY more on the go are more flatter rather like a full sized hull which has a planing/ flatter hull turn to the flatness of the water than a typical poorly behaving model boat hull which invariably heels TOOOO much and somewhat digging in , (in turns). The HARD CHINE hull design was meant to not only rise to a comfortable plane attitude but ALSO to turn without that annoying behaviour of "digging in" when it should still perform and exhibit that hard chine design attitude when in a turn . "Digging in" equals water resistance AGAINST the hull and loss of performance and loss of plane attitude and against wave resistance when the hull designers team is trying to maintain hard chine performance in the forward turning direction. I harp on this point that this hull design is one to respect . The older I get the more I expect of all my model machines that I am lucky to see on computers, as we certainly have more need to respect the masters, the likes of Peter Du Cane and T E Lawrence and Hubert Scott Payne of Vospers and Thornycroft and The British Power Boat Company and ELCO and Higgins, all of whom I have researched so much over my life and I have been to the memorial of Lawrence in the desert in Wadi Rum. I try to do it right. Regards to all builders Lyle. My mates and I have to run in 2 to 3 inch chop at times, such is the Lake Channel ! My wife has reminded me that some of my fleet do seem to have BLACK hulls and I only would build one model boat, when I bought the Aerobats Crash Boat home, the pictures are of some of my scratch built fleet.

TRIUMPH (CG-52301) USCG Type F MLB by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Laser cut kit from Barracuda RC Boats, N Carolina, USA. Baltic birch plywood false keel, ribs/frames, hull sheathing, deck and cabins. No formal plans; I was able to source a handful of B&W archival photos from the USCG website. Fortunately I was able to procure a motherload of archival photos and a few hard to read layout drawings from Mr. Timothy Dring, LCDR, USN (Ret.). He is co-author of "American Coastal Rescue Craft", which is the "bible" if you will, of such. I do sometimes thank the internet. I am certain that without his assistance, my efforts on this wouldn't have been as enjoyable. The kit was also void of fittings, which I was aware of prior to purchase, so I invested in a 3D printer. That I've used to a limited degree, due to searching for parts in the correct file format is mind-numbing! I have globally sourced fittings; USA, UK, ASIA. As a matter of fact, the searchlights I got from this Model Boat Shop were 3D printed, and I was able to fit 5mm LEDs into them. I'd like to get a couple more and put some superbright 12v LED drone lamps in them for use on my 35" towboat. Many deck fittings are handmade when possible, the cleats and fairleads are from Cornwall Boats, UK. (Very reasonable & diverse source, if you didn't already know.) I try to keep wood natural when detail allows it, as I never have enjoyed painting over natural grain. Her decks are covered with 1/16" scribed basswood sheathing from earthandtree.com, which is normally used for wainscoting dollhouse walls. All my boats that have wood decks are covered with scribed sheathing; I feel it makes 'em look "sexy". Believe it or not, the idea for wainscoting came from finding 3/16" at Hobby Lobby's dollhouse department. A couple of feet x 3.5" was about $16, so I found a less expensive source that also had more selections (earthandtree.com) The rail stanchions are 3/16" square dowels with 2 corners rounded over on the Dremel router table. Leaving their base square, I fit a square peg into a round hole with no glue to facilitate removal, and also for ease of replacing broken ones, which is inevitable. The rail is 1/16" brass rod that also is readily removable. The stern rail is stationary on the lower half, and the chain & wire stanchions are removable for towing ops. The deck coamings and knuckle are African mahogany strips, other mahogany accents came from leftovers of a prior build. I also try on all my boats, to incorporate vintage leftover scribed sheathing salvaged from my late Father's builds, so I know he's got a part in my builds. Note-the raised deck section between the aft ladder trunk and towing bit is actually a laminated deckhouse he made for the Frigate Essex. Unfortunately, he was unable to build that kit due to Alzheimer's disease in his latter years. (I blame that mostly on the hazardous fumes from the airplane "dope" & glue he used when building RC planes in the 60s & 70s.) I use polyurethane instead of resin due to COPD, 37 yrs of smoking, I quit 2.5 yrs ago. The driveline consists of: 775 Johnson DC main (3500 RPM@12V), Harbor Models 4mm x 14" shaft w/brass stuffing box, Raboesch 75mm 5-blade brass wheel (not OEM), 5mm U-joint couplers, Dimart 320A fan-cooled ESC. Handmade wooden teardrop rudder on a 3/8" sternpost, 1/4" tiller arm steered by a Halcion sail winch servo and cable system. Flysky 6 channel. The nav lights and other illumination are Lighthouse 9v LEDs, also a GoolRC Receiver controlled flashing blue Law Enforcement light. Obviously, I put the cart before the horse and completed the topsides and below deck before finishing the outer hull, but the Wx and season change dictated such. Can't wait for Spring!

CG-40564 by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
[Score: 9/10] 35"/4500g CG-40564 Capable of 15mph and a runtime of 45mins Twin Propellors (4 Blade 50mm) Direct Drive to a 775 JOHNSON-TYPE 6-12V (4 Blade) Powered by NiMH (8.4v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through HOBBYWING (15Amps) ESC - Comments: DUMAS 1:14 USCG 40' UTB. REPRESENTING US COAST GUARD UTILITY BOAT CG-40564, WHICH CAPSIZED DURING A RESCUE ATTEMPT ON THE COLUMBIA RIVER BAR ON 17 JAN 1961. HER CREW WAS FORTUNATELY RESCUED. SHE WAS ASSISTING CG-52301, A 52' TYPE F WOODEN MLB, WHICH FOUNDERED WITH THE LOSS OF ALL HANDS. IT REMAINS THE WORST SMALL BOAT RESCUE DISASTER IN COAST GUARD HISTORY. THIS IS AN UNUSUAL SCALE BALSA PLANK-ON, COVERED BY 2 OZ FIBERGLASS. I USED MINWAX POLYURETHANE FOR AN ALTERNATE TO RESIN, WHICH TURNED OUT WELL, AND CAN BE DONE WITH MINIMAL VENTILATION. WITH BIRCH PLY DECK & CABINS, 1/8" SCRIBED SHEATHING COVERS THE DECK BOW TO STERN AND MAHOGANY TRIM LEFTOVER FROM ANOTHER DUMAS KIT IN MY SCALE SHIPYARD. STOCK D/C FITTINGS WITH SOME SUPPLEMENTAL PREMADE AND HANDMADE ITEMS. SHE FEATURES TWIN RABOESCH 4-BLADE WIDE FLUKE WHEELS AND MATCHING RUDDERS; WORKING HATCHES WITH STOWAGE AREA FOR ANCHOR & TOWLINE, LIGHTHOUSE 9V LED NAV LIGHTS AND FLASHING LED LAW ENFORCEMENT BLUE LIGHT (RC CONTROLLED). I'M ADDING A MOUNT FOR A SCALE BROWNING M2 50 CAL THAT I WAS ABLE TO PRODUCE ON MY 3D PRINTER. THAT'S AN ADVENTURE IN ITSELF. THIS WAS MY FIRST REAL PLANK ON BULKHEAD, AND BALSAWOOD CAN BE A LIL TRICKY, BUT WILL ALWAYS BE THE STANDARD OF WHICH I COMPARE ALL MY SUBSEQUENT BUILDS. MY FATHER BUILT RC AIRCRAFT, AND ALWAYS PREACHED THAT YOU SHOULD OVERBUILD IN ORDER TO SURVIVE A CRACK-UP AND FLY ANOTHER DAY! THAT'S MY CREED WITH BOATS. OVERBUILD!!! THANK YOU DAD! BTW-FYI-MR. ARNOLD PALMER WAS A US COAST GUARDSMAN (YM3) 1950-53

USCG CG-44345 by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 28"/1400g USCG CG-44345 Capable of 14mph and a runtime of 45mins Twin Propellors (3 Blade 40mm) Direct Drive to a MAB 540 (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (8.4v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through HOBBYWING (10Amps) ESC - Comments: VINTAGE BILLING BOATS (MY FIRST RC ENDEAVOR 1989) 1:20 US COAST GUARD 44' MOTOR LIFEBOAT. ABS HULL & DECK WITH PLYWOOD CABINS. ALL STOCK RUNNING HARDWARE AND FITTINGS. I'M CURRENTLY OVERHAULING HER, HULL IS DECORATED AND MARKED WITH NEW DECALS. THE ORIG KIT WAS CG-44329, WHICH SAILED OUT OF US COAST GUARD LIFEBOAT STATION MANASQUAN INLET, NJ. I CHANGED THE HULL NUMBER AND RELOCATED HER TO USCG LIFEBOAT STATION LUDINGTON, MI., WHICH WAS MY DREAM STATION WHEN I WAS A PROUD US COAST GUARDSMAN, '80-86. THERE WERE 110 OF THESE MLB'S BUILT BY THE COAST GUARD YARD IN CURTIS BAY, MD, AND THE DESIGN WAS SO SUCCESSFUL, IT WAS DUPLICATED BY THE RNLI AND STILL IN SERVICE TODAY. THERE ARE EVEN A COUPLE FOR SALE THE LAST TIME I CHECKED. OTHER THAN THE 40' UTB, THE 44 IS MY FAVORITE COASTAL RESCUE CRAFT. YES-MR. ARNOLD PALMER WAS A US COAST GUARDSMAN (YM3) 1950-53

Motor problem by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi Richard, that lead acid is way too big and heavy. I Remember going on hols as a kid, car was loaded up, all family, roofrack, deck chairs, tent and so on, and Dads old Moggie Traveller would barely climb the Welsh hills! Same here, its just dead weight, ideal for a tug etc, no speed required, and ballast needed. This boat wasn't any slouch in its day, As Havelock says, it was originally built as a ic powered model so could stand being heavy. To achieve balance, its a matter of moving things around, not adding, so just move things forward, you will be surprised how the weight increases once you start adding Deck clutter, fittings and so on. Lightweight, is good. Your comment, stood up in the water at half throttle isn't going fast, its just bad weight displacement causing the bow tyo be too high. That setup would never have been that fast, the motor/battery combo will never cause a heavy ply boat to be going that fast its standing on end Couple of things to consider. Your nimhs, how many times have these been cycled, and what sort of charger are you using? A reasonable charger will give the information, if I know what you are using, Ill advise accordingly as you might not be getting the best from these batteries what prop are you on Think of an rc plane (if you fly them its easier) If the cog is too far back, the nose is pitching up, and its almost impossible to control, it almost porpoises in the air, and is very bad. COG is vital on a rc plane, nose heavy is better, only because its more controllable. COG is equally important with a boat, but harder to see the implications, the hull will give us false info, such as if the bow is up its on the plane, no, not necessarily, its not planing due to speed, its just out of balance. Shifting the weight radically will let you see this, sorry for the ramble, Wish you where closer to me I would love to help hands on👍 Ive tried to find a suitable video of my Huntman to display what I'm rambling on about. This video is poor quality, but it displays that boat moving very fast (25mph with on board data logger) but look how flat it is, its planning, as the forward 1/3 of the hull is out of the water, but its not standing on its tail, this is because its balanced. You boat is pretty similar in design to this so whilst you wont want to go this fast, the picture should look the same. This Huntsman weighs 6kg with batteries (lipos, you will NEVER get a nimh or lead acid to do this) and is 4 foot long, so quite a heavy old girl first constructed as an IC model in the early 70's. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5-YmmElIfk&t=34s and here is a picture of my 3 foot aerokits fireboat, bow up, is it planing, no, its way out of balance, it wasnt actaully going that fast Hope that helps Paul

Motor problem by RichardSReade Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 months ago
Thank you gents, I will get a bigger motor and reduce the prop size as I do not want it any faster than it is, also a smaller prop as everyone has said will reduce the power drained from the battery, I have a water scoop and tubing so will be fitting that today and will fit a water jacket around the motor, also I am thinking weighing the lead weight fitted in the compartment behind the motor and replace some or all of it and fit a 12 volt 7 amph sealed lead acid battery, presumably this will last longer than the present batteries fitted, or will it?