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>> Home > Tags > fitting led

fitting led
boating
coating
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deck fittings
fitting the side skins
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fitting led
Cabin roofs by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
Theoretically this should be a very straight forward process and a change from rubbing down the hull so let’s look at the instructions – what instructions! First of all fit some thin card to the sides of the cabin walls to allow for a clearance fit (cornflakes packet) then some minor trimming of the spars to give an exact ,(not tight) fit across the side supports, I decided to pin each of the parts together as well as epoxy in the joints. I always find the best approach is to use a jig to drill pilot holes for the pins ensuring that the pins do not split the wood and the construction is accurate. The frame is then glued up and placed back in the boat and left to dry next job is to fit the corner strengthening pieces, the easiest way I found was to put a card support for the corners to rest on whilst they set still in the cabin structure. Looking forward I had decided to retain the cabin lids with Neodymium magnets so I machined a slot in the corner pieces underside to house the magnets, to be fitted at a later date. Next job is to fit the roof skins which again will be pinned using the 0.7mm brass pins. The roof skins are now epoxied in place so I need to mark out the position of the secondary panels. Looking at the pieces and the instructions the spacer frames seem to be the same size but I was sure I’d read somewhere that these overhung by 2-3mm, reading Robs blog conformed this to be the case. So some trimming required before fitting and marking out the appropriate position then being glued into position. The mid cabin was assembled in exactly the same way

Spektrum, new, useless... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 18 days ago
As reported elsewhere, I have today received the FlySky RC set and it works...perfectly.....straight outa the box as it's PRE-BOUND! And my dear bride has let me have it before my birthday. Although I still have to wait for the Crash Tender Yeoman fittings kit! I would like to use something old in the Crash Tender as it is old itself, so I guess I'd better have a look at your circuit diagrams Doug,as far as suppression and even ESCs are concerned. I have found 3 ESCs today. One I knew of and 2, WITH their instruction in best Chenglish that I had no memory of! Water -cooled too! I'll send you a photo of them. Cheers, Martin

Christian Radich by pjarrett Petty Officer   Posted: 21 days ago
[Score: 5/10] 22"/600g Christian Radich - Comments: My model of the Christian Radich a Norwegian full-rigged ship. I don’t recall the manufacturer’s details of this model kit but I believe it was of Spanish origin. Construction of the model is a double plank hull and deck with most of the small fittings being supplied in the kit of parts, the build time was 680 hours. The vessel was built in Sandefjord, Norway and was delivered on 17 June 1937. The owner was The Christian Radich Sail Training Foundation established by a grant from an officer of that name. The vessel is a full-rigged three masted steel hull, 62.5 m long, with an overall length of 73 m including the bowsprit and a maximum width of 9.7 m. She has a draught of about 4.7 meters and a displacement at full load of 1050 tons. Under engine power she reaches a top speed of 10 knots, while she can make up to 14 knots under sail. In 1939, the ship sailed across the Atlantic to visit the World Trade Fair in New York. The ship and the voyage created huge press coverage and made Christian Radich famous. When the ship came back home in September 1939, she was taken over by the Norwegian Navy. After the German invasion, the Nazi’s used the ship as an accommodation ship. At the end of the war, Christian Radich was towed to Flensburg in Germany where it was later bombed and sunk. At the end of the war, Christian Radich was hoisted up and towed to Kiel with a minesweeper as a protection ship. She was later towed to Norway and fully restored in 1947. There is a rich source of information about this beautiful ship on the internet if anyone is interested to learn more about her.

54 year old Crash Tender by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
I would like first to say that this is NOT a restoration. It has always been mine and followed me around all those years, been used extensively on Oyster beds on the Essex coast and Valentine's Park in Ilford, Essex...even the great Victoria Park, of which my Granddad was a founder member. It has eaten its way through lantern batteries out of number which my Dad, who was in the business could magic from thin air. There was always a nook in the boot of the Triumph Town and Country saloon and then the Austin Westminster for another new lantern battery, which the Taycol would destroy in about 20 intermittent minutes of left, centre, right, centre from the REP single channel gear. How I wish I still had that, but it was stolen. The REP, that is, the Taycol remains, restored and cleaned and like new again waiting to go back in the boat. I finally decided I should finish it. My wife bought me a set of white metal fittings by Yeoman out of IP Engineering, so I have no excuse. Not that I need one. It has suffered a bit over that half a century, losing odd panels, but they are easily remade and replaced. First, I had to clean out the insides of the detritus and loft life of decades. Vacuuming, scraping with a pointy thing and brushing with a stiff brush, followed by more vacuuming using a clever attachment that my dear wife thought might be useful and it was, being at least a dozen stiff, but small diameter tubes poking out of the end of a nozzle. It both pokes and nudges the old dirt and dust and sucks it away. After that the old thin mahogany deck planks, my friend thought to add in the late 60s were removed and saved where salvageable as I quite like them for trim on other boats. The deck was rather brutalised with a coarse rasp and any loose nails punched back in flush or slightly below. Then some way too old, but still good, epoxy (WEST) was used to slar all over the decks and most of the insides, even some of the cabin sides. That will be finished before dark today. I can hardly believe the epoxy still works, but it does, perfectly and so is pressed into use. In this warm weather it set very quickly. I did my usual trick of squeegeeing it on into the grain with an old credit card or Gummi, which is a sample block of silicon. Styrene will also do. I use some spare 2mm stuff I was given (that guy at IP Engineering again). The roofs had already been corrected the other evening and heavily cellulose sanding sealed. The forward cabin removeable roof was unwarped by having a tight fitting diagonal piece of pear pressed in under the top skin and glued. The new hatch on that roof was made and the shape of the roof and hatch runners changed slightly, as per drawings from this site. Here are pics. of the work today. The above resinning, the remade cabin panels a new wheelhouse bulkhead and the tow hook base panel, finally a new aft cockpit rear coaming which it never had but should have. Cheers, Martin

Chine rubbing strakes by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
As the hull glass matting is really dry and has had some minor filling done it’s time to fit the chine rubbing strakes. which have been in the jig now for some days and consisted of a two dimensional curvature jig. In order to make sure the strakes were equally balanced on each side I made a cardboard template that followed the Chine stringers line and rested on the Gunwhale rubbing strakes, having drawn a line on the port side I flipped the template over and drew a line on the starboard side giving a perfectly equal curve on each side So now to prepare them for fitting. The jig had made a curve that was a really good fit without much spring. I decided to use some very small brass pins (0.5dia x 10mm long) to hold them whilst the epoxy sets. I pre drilled the whole length of the strake and lightly inserted pins along its length, then applied the epoxy and started to fix from the bow and followed the pencil line back to the stern. This was repeated on the other side, when set there was some minor filling to be done/filling pin holes.

Amsterdam by Hybrid Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 29 days ago
Hi.all.new to.my.fleet is this lovely 42"x11 tug called Amsterdam. I' am going to put her back to original and use her for towing. But before I start the over hall. I need some help people can't find this kit Any where all the ones I van find are pvc hull and thus one is full wood plank hull and and top and all the fittings are.led.and.brass. So want to no.the.age make and any other info someone has.to make.her.right

Fittings & Detail Parts by pittsfieldpete Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Greetings, everyone: I’m looking for an online sources that offer fittings & detail parts, especially for modern tugboats. I have Hobby Engine’s 1:36 scale Richardson tugboat which is already pretty well detailed, but I’d like to replace its two deckhouse life rings with better looking ones & add a few others in appropriate locations. I’m also looking for a life raft drum & a few other detail parts here & there. Most of all I’d like to find navigation lights for the mast. The housings can be most any material but the lenses must be clear. I’m going to remove all of the “dummy” navigation lights on the mast & replace them with LED-lighted ones. The boat came with working port & starboard sidelights so they won’t need to be replaced. I’ve got a dredging barge designed (in my head) to use as a companion for tug. I’ve got all of the basic materials stockpiled for the barge itself plus a nice lattice boom crane for the dredge. I found a beautiful metal clamshell bucket that’s a work of art to use with the crane, too. Although I could scratchbuild things bitts & bollards I’d consider buying some as a time saver. I’ll need portholes for the deckhouse, ventilators, etc. as well. I live in western Massachusetts which is a beautiful area but there aren’t any hobby shops nearby that stock ship fittings of any sort. I used to buy fittings from A.J. Fischer & Bliss Marine but they both went out of business a long time ago. I’ve found several online shops that sell ship kits & fittings but they’re mostly for small scale sailing vessels. I’d appreciate any suggestions. Thanks, Pete

Tamar deck colour by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Alan, Ford Polar Grey looks about right 👍 See pics of original here http://modelslipway.com/tamar/tamar_fullsize_arles_gallery/i... Maybe a final coat of matt or semi matt lacquer to tone down the gloss a little? Spigots are a good idea. For the small deck cleats on my Sea Scout I drilled 1mm holes using my mini milling machine as a drill press😉 Then Loctited 1mm spring steel rod into them. Deck was varnished and polished before fitting with Deluxe Materials Roket gluper sue! The larger tank filler caps on the aft deck I drilled and tapped 3mm fitted studs with Loctite and glued domed nuts into the frame underneath, cos I need to be able to remove the deck for rudder servicing. Happy spraying, cheers, Doug 😎

Totnes Castle 1894 by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Change of plan, bent up tin plate angle to strengthen the sides on boiler room roof. Milling the brass would be wasteful I don't like waste. Another thing I disliked was the safety valve not being upright. So made a angle fitting, turned the male end in normal manner & parted off. Set in pillar drill at the required angle drilled down to meet the hole from other end. Started tap wile still in drill (by hand) then completed with wrench. Threaded a bar to fit & attached fitting in lathe, turned so the safety valve fitted flat.

Vanity, Victorian Cutter by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Thanks, I used to make top end model furniture for the Home Miniaturists. It's my way of finding a connection with my cabinet maker Granddad, who was a big model boat fan too, in fact he was a founder member of the Victoria Model Steamboat Club. She is 48x9x11 plus bowsprit. Height of rig is about 4 feet also. And yes the fitting on the keel is a piece of ally box section cut in half so it becomes U section, drilled through at equal spacing for the fin keel. Then the U section is screwed with brass screws and Marineflex sealer/adhesive to the keel, which is all solid hardwood. I did my sums and gave up, so once she was waterproof I put her in my son's fish pond and kept piling stuff in until she floated on her marks. Rigging won't be that heavy, but I made an allowance for it. Once it was floating right it turned out to need 14 1/2lbs. of ballast. BUT, that's inside. On the end of a 15" inch(ish) fin it will be less. I have 2 half bulbs cast by my other son in his back garden from my patterns. They will be bolted to the fin and faired in. Cheers, Martin

FS: Robbe PT-15 KIT by bustedknuckles Apprentice   Posted: 2 months ago
From my personal model stash: PT-15 This kit is the 1/40 scale Robbe kit approx 34 long and 9 inches wide when built. A new kit, but I do not have the original box for it. . It APPEARS that everything is in the box including the ROBBE PT-15 Fittings Set 1098 (For PT-15 Kit, No 1097). Stuffing tube, motor and prop are included. The plans and an instructions book that does have English instructions is also included. Contact me if you have any questions about the kit, or would like detailed pictures. Price is $200USD plus shipping ( keep in mind it is a large box...) The price of this new is $390 plus tax see http://www.loyalhannadockyard.com/ROBPT15.htm for more information I also will be listing a Robbe SCHNELLBOOTE KIT shortly, for the same price.....

RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch by ronrees Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 10/10] 16"/500g RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch Capable of 15mph and a runtime of 90mins Single Propellor (2 Blade X Type 25mm) Direct Drive to a Turnigy 2211 x 1400kv (2 Blade X Type) Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) 2Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through HK 10 Car For/Rev. (5Amps) ESC - Comments: This is another article for MB magazine. The model plan had to fit across 2 pages (A3) Hence its length. This one is built using the old Keil Kraft Eezibilt methods of the late 1950's. Made using mainly Balsa wood and covered in nylon tights and dope. It is fully detailed mainly using odds and ends . The plexiglass gun turrets are made using 21mm Carp fishing 'Ball' floats. Masters in plastic were fitted to the model after mouldings were made for the Oerlikon 20mm and all the Lewis guns as well as shrapnel padding and most fittings. 2 sheets of highly detailed plans will be free in the Winter Special hopefully with a full photo and build write up. It goes like a rocket. Great little model and all for under £25.00!. (Inc ESC, Motor and battery!)

Grimmershorn II by CB90 Captain   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 5/10] 40"/5000g Grimmershorn II Capable of 7mph and a runtime of 60mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 70mm) Direct Drive to a 950 (3 Blade) Powered by Lead Acid (12v) 12Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through 15A 24v (5Amps) ESC - Comments: The Motor vessel 'Grimmershorn' was built in 1956/57 by Hansa Stahlund Schiffbau GmbH at Koln-Deutz for the Waterways and Shipping Administration at Cuxhaven.Her Daimler-Benz four stroke diesel engine had an output of 500hp. permitting a speed of 11.5 knots. The model hull and deck are vacuum formed ABS, timber work of precision cut ply, 2 full size plan sheets and a construction manual along with a fittings pack complete this kit. Technical Data Scale: 1:20 Length: 1038mm Beam 305mm The Grimmershorn was the second major kit I purchased from a model shop on the outskirts of Harlow in Essex back in the 1980s. The Krik kit is still produced and sold today. My build was a slow and lost enthusiasm so after completing the hull, deck, motor and bow thruster installation I gave the boat to my father in-law who completed the superstructure and sailed the boat for a while, eventually the boat was given back to me when the father in-law moved house. I then repaired the rudder, added a moving radar, a adjustable water cannon and pump also various extra fittings such as a detailed life raft and crane, buoys and captain figure. thus renamed the boat as Grimmershorn II a Search and rescue fire boat.

Cabin roof mechanism by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
As I mentioned in a previous post I want to put some detail into the cabin and in order to do this I wanted the roof to open so that the detail can be seen and also giving good access for construction and detailing. So I looked at various lifting lever systems and the one which gave greatest access and took minimal room was a simple parallel bar mechanism. I first made a card model to ensure it worked before investing a lot of work in making the real thing. I used some brass plate cut into 3 x 2mm strips and using 10BA fastenings I constructed the levers and securing plates. Before fitting the mechanism and cutting any roof trusses I tried the mechanism using the brass bars and a card roof replica to once again prove its operation. I then added further cross beams to ensure the roof frame stays stable when the roof is lifted and that the roof skins had sufficient support when closed. All through this design and make session the cabin frame was only secured by temporary pins and had and no roof skins fitted, this enabled it to be lifted off in one piece whilst working on the frame. Now the mechanism works the cabin detail can be finished before finally fitting the roof skins.

Decks by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Templates were made out of cardboard, good job that I like Weetabix, a bit of messing about but eventually I got a good fit, these were transferred onto the 3mm ply for the deck. Before fitting the deck the ply was given a couple of coats of Z-Poxy finishing resin rubbing down in-between coats, this filled in the grain ready for painting and also made it waterproof. After the glue had dried the deck and bulwark were given a coat of primere, then two coats of the finishing colour. After a week of the paint left to harden the coamings (if that's the right spelling) were glued in place.