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>> Home > Tags > fitting led

fitting led
boating
coating
contra rotating
deck fittings
fitting the side skins
fittings
hull plating
lighting
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tinting
fitting led
Life Rings by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
The white metal fittings supplied with the kit are somewhat lacking in detail and some are overweight to say the least. I decided to produce some life rings to my specification I had tried to find suitable replacements on the web without success. So how to produce the ring part. I first tried with plywood but the finish achievable was not acceptable (can be seen in the pictures) so I then decided to use Bamboo (Ikea phone stand) for those who have followed from the start the same material as the grating on the foam tanks. First I cut some rough circles out of 10mm bamboo sheet and drilled a 10mm hole so it can be mounted on a 10mm screw mandrel. This allows the piece to machined on one side and then reversed and machined on the other side. The tool I used was ground with a 22 mm radius to produce the shape on one side of the ring and then when reversed and machined again the tool actually “parts off” the ring on the inner diameter leaving the ring free on the now remaining peg, the finish on the bamboo was good enough without any further sanding. The next step was to put a slot in the OD at 90degree intervals to hold the “rope” in position while the rope is bound in four places. The easiest way was to make a jig to hold the ring and to keep the rope in place while it’s glued into ring, it can then be removed and bound in four places each turn being super glued to keep it in place. Next job is to give a coat of sanding sealer that stiffens the rope and seals the wood. The rings are theoretically held to the cabin roof with clamp type brackets so again to ensure consistency I machined a piece with a suitable profile. I then cut radial slices to create individual brackets. The rings will actually be fastened to the cabin roof with 2 x 8BA bolts this is to enable them to be removed for painting of both the ring and the roof. At a later painting stage, I will be giving them two coats of grey primer and three coats of white, then hand painting the rope loops with red paint. The finished rings are much lighter and hopefully look more realistic.

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
Hi Pete, Thanks 😊 Yep, I decided to stick with 4 lights cos tha's all I see on the original 'WYEFORCE'. Yep again! I do intend to modify the two lights on the stub mast; 1 yellow 'Towing' and 1 white 'Stern'. I will also fit a wheelhouse light. Decided to do it 'fluorescent' style by fitting 2 white 3mm LEDs in the ends of a long block of 5mm perspex. After that the 2 work-deck floodlights, lower cabin lights and 2 deck lamps 1 each side of the main cabin. I'll probably link the cabin and deck lights so that they all come on together. Now pondering how to build a miniature working diesel genny to power them all😁 Good luck with your divider! You will have more wires to squash in than I did so I doubt there's room. Have fun trying. I separated the wires quite easily by keeping all the negative legs of the LEDs (that's the leg going to the larger electrode in the diode) on one side and soldering them to the brass wire negative rail first. Then I took colour coded thin 'hook-up' wire to each LED in turn; working from the top down. Cut the LED leg to 1/4", stripped the hook-up wire back 1/4", twisted the wire strands together and tinned it. Tin the LED leg as well and bend it 90° down the mast. Then it's easy to solder the wire cleanly to the LED keeping it well away from any other wires. When all was connected, and tested OK, I stuck the wires down with thick gel super glue so they can't wander about. To fit the LEDs to the mast, I removed the brackets; removed the dummy lights with a razor saw, filed the mounting flat and drilled holes for the LED legs in them, using a 0.75mm drill bit in a pin chuck, and glued the LEDs on with gluper sue. Then I bent the leads 90° back towards the mast and drilled 0.75mm holes horizontally into the mast so I could literally 'plug' the lamp bracket complete with LED straight in and glue it down. Painted matt black the leads become invisible, as in 3rd pic above😉 Winch: at least your version of the model seems to HAVE a winch! Or where did those two pics come from? Mine ain't got nuffink, just a big 'ole at the back of the cabin😭 All the best, Doug 😎

Boat lifting eyes by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Boat lifting eyes As has been said by others the boat lifting eyes are a small detail but an important one, somehow when detailing gets in your head its difficult not to seek it out. Anyway, there are six eyes three on each side, which I presume, are for lifting the boat out of the water, unfortunately there isn’t any detail on size so it’s down to “builders eye”. I made the six in a batch, that’s to say I first made six identical pieces 10.5mm x 20.5mm x 2mm thick and drilled the hole in each then the six pieces fastened together with an M4 screw and then machined together to ensure uniformity and ease of production. I then skimmed them to final size 10 x 20 followed by milling the concave and convex radii on the top. I intend to sink the eye into the deck and secure using a brass pin sideways into the gunwhale stringers and epoxied into position. To ease fitting I made a small jig, which will allow a 2mm slot to be cut in the exact position on the deck along with a drilled hole at 90 degrees. Two small grub screws fasten the jig to the gunwale stringers while the slot and holes are machined. After all the slots had been prepared I then made all the foot rails that run along the edge of the deck from bow to stern, the first set I used the obeche supplied in the kit, however as they are in a place that could get knocked I decided to rework then in walnut. Finally I pre drilled all the foot rails ready for temporary pinning. Having all the components ready it is time to assemble with epoxy resin, using sparingly and making sure not to get any on the visible part of the brass lifting eyes and using pins to hold in position while curing. PS sorry about some of the picture quality but I didn't check them until after assembly

Now Coating and Matting by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
On to Coating and Matting. (as well as sanding!) Now have at least finished all the stripping. Then did the ‘bright light in the hull bit’ to look for areas that needed patching. The major problem area was in the bow and that did not receive the light as it is a totally blanked off compartment. However, it was obvious from the outside anyway so, could I assume it was the only leak? Decided to put a fine matt over the whole hull, not deck, just to be sure of best chance of success. I can imagine what will be said here if it still leaks after all this! I had ordered some supplies ready for the next stage and drew up a plan view of the boat to help think through layout of electrics and other items. Made my usual mistakes about size. Some fittings purchased too small………However, never too large now that’s interesting. Some materials purchased too large. Now have a life’s worth of Resin……(when does it ‘go off’ by?) Also have a lounge floors worth of tissue matting! Also Sandpaper. Now there is a mine field. So now I know a bit more about that and which way the numbers work! When I forgot to put the mask on, I had some of the crispest 'bogies' in years.............. No images posted! On the plus side, although I never wanted to get into this stripping sanding, filling sanding, sealing sanding, matting sanding, painting sanding, painting, sanding bit……………. I now feel I started out with someone’s boat I had bought and now it has become “my boat” for real! I am at the stage now where I have put some filler in and applied the first coat of Eze-Kote from DeLuxe Materials To use Eze-kote read stuff from RNinMunich on this blog or the’ leaking boat’ thread. Washes out of the brushes very easily. There is such as this ..... Youtube link - watch?v=yP05qv3QtUk RNinMunich or Colin H. and the like have bits of extra comment and experience that is always very helpful. BTW, after that finer sanding before first coat, I did the dust down and vacuuming bit but it still felt a bit ‘chalky’ so I gave it a wipe with Methylated Spirits. Now I realise that has water in it, so if anything goes wrong it could be blamed on that................. Having left the first coat to dry I started to cut out the light matt to apply after the next sanding. The matting I have is called Glassfibre Surface Tissue EGlass from FibreGlass Direct. A part of Tricel Composites (NI) Limited. Available internationally in lengths from a metre upwards, it is quite fine in weave so we shall see what happens. I have left quite a wide margin at the moment but may reduce that when I have tried using it! This is another first for me so plenty of room for mistakes............... Will need to cover with the matt in stages as I cannot get around all the boat without changing its position. Going for the bottom of the vessel and stern board first as I figure they are going to be easier than some of the other bits. Then will leave that to cure before moving the boat. Really worried about the joins/overlaps and how well I will cope with those, not to mention the curved bit! Started to look at electrics and layout for a bit of a change. I will post again when I have had the first battles with the matting! TTFN. NPJ

Pilot Boat by MouldBuilder Captain   Posted: 19 days ago
Winter approaches again so what better than a new project,.......to go along with the other two yet to be completed. I have excuses. Honest!! This new one is a bit different again. No wood at all this time. It is the Aero-naut Pilot Boat. I thought it didn`t look too much of a task but I think I will have to re-assess as it is tricky in parts. I have assembled the hull frame, which although the parts are rather loose fitting until glued went ok. I have, however, stumbled slightly on the next stage, to fit the hull skins. The instructions suggest to cellotape them in place prior to glueing. Not as easy as it sounds as considerable bending of the parts is required to get them to fit, too much for the tape. Does anybody know of an easier approach please. The ABS is extremely difficult to hold in position when trying to tape it, which incidently, does not hold anyway. Should I warm up the skins or will this distort them and give a rippled finish. Any help here would be appreciated.🤓 I will continue with the refurbishment of the Patrol Torpedo Boat for now as I have been trying to manipulate the sides of the Pilot boat into place for hours, no, days!!.😡😤

Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 30 days ago
Hi folks, I've been filling in spaces in the Vincent epic with making deck fittings for the Chris Craft Special Runabout. I can't find or, probably, afford to get them nickel plated, so I will give the brass fittings to a chum who does casting of white metal, then I can a) get more than one of some and b) burnish them to look like chrome and then lacquer them. I'm assuming there might be a measure of interest in how these are done. I'm afraid I can't tell you how to do these without a lathe, because I've always had or had the use of, a lathe. They can be bought for a fraction of the price of a kit, off ebay. My No 1 son bought a lathe exactly like mine (a Peatol, which is same as the Taig), only on a huge base with a nice big motor, a tool rack to hold every supplied, additional tool they make for it and even the book on how to use it and make even more tools for it, virtually unused, for £200. Similar small lathes can be had for even less. It's the brass that costs these days! Anyway, the trick is to break down the shape to that which can be cut, turned or bent. You can do all those things, so all you need to be able to do is silver solder and soft solder. If you can't yet, learn, sharpish. Silver soldering has enabled to earn a living till I retired. It helped me bring up a family of 5, so it's clearly very useful. I won't describe it in boring detail as these days there's a Youtube for every damned thing if you can tolerate that ghastly delivery that so many of them have. I can't, so I'm happy to answer questions if anyone wants to be told straight what to do. Golden rules....make it totally clean with a Swiss file, have sufficient heat, use the right flux. In silver soldering, just sprinkle the powdered flux on, don't bother making a paste, it'll just fizz and shift your little parts. For this part, one of the various patterns of deck lights/flag pole holders that Chris Craft used, I started by turning the main shape of the bulbous bit to be rather like a thimble. I then cut gaps out of it in the vice with a junior hacksaw, so that it had three legs, oversized for now. Then make a teardrop shape out of 1/16th" sheet and cut a hole in it to match. Why the hole? Well, if this is to cast successfully, I don't need any undercuts or "hooks " in the mould so it has to be hollow. Also, I need to put the light lenses in after it's all finished as these units had riding or nav. lights in them. They also had a small jack staff in the top with a burgee or even a national ensign attached. To make the rather art nouveau-ish back end I made a cardboard pattern of what had to be cut from 1mm brass sheet to be folded, hammered a bit and rolled a bit to fit onto the back of the thimble section. I silver soldered the thimble on first, to make it easy to fit the back rolled and folded bit, which was itself then silver soldered on. After that, it's all down to filing to shape, then as you can see from the pencil lines, cut out the teardrop shaped holes in the back which leave a central spine shape. I would first drill a 3mm hole and then, with the piece in a vice use a dental burr in a minidrill and hand mill it out, but PLEASE make sure it can't slip or you could be the owner of a grooved thumb or worse. Finish with files and papers of various grades. More anon when I do the next bits, although you're already further on than I am! Cheers, Martin

Burpy Hapday! ;-) by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Thanks Fred 😊 Actual birthday was Friday, but I'm stretching it over the weekend😁 Yesterday was also a good day, out with the GF and then dinner at her place😉 Also started modding the mast of my Southampton tug for fitting LED lights. After working out how to do it for Pittsfieldpete I thought Why not!? Cheers, Doug 😎

20th Scale ELCO 80ft PT boat part 6 by CB90 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Dry fitting pro-shafts (Note, all shafts parallel with the keel) Drilled with an old prop-shaft which I modified to a cutting tool then finished with a round file and cut slots for propeller-shaft support bracket with a hacksaw, file and knife. Note these shafts are lightweight aluminium tube with steel liners and steel shafts. props at currently 40mm but as with all things scale things are not always practical in scale size such as propellers and rudders and in this case the direction of rotation (not all going round clockwise).

Deans Robert E. Perry Libertyship by Mikep Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Started building Deans Marine Libertyship Robert E. Perry finished Lenth 54 1/2” beam 7 1/2” weight 35 lbs. Power is Deans motor Falcon 3671 6 volt 1500rpm 3.19mm shaft and prop 147-18 brass propeller 50-L-4bl-M4. Kit is very nicely done all fittings and hardware are included with the kit. The hull is detailed and I have lined the inside of the hull with 2 x 2 oz. fiberglass cloth and resin to give it more rigidity. I have installed the motor and prop shaft along with the rudder which I replaced since the kit supplied rudder was cast resin and only had a 3/32 dia shaft, I’m sure it would work fine but felt better with something a little more substantial. Added 5 lbs of ballast I used shot and installed sub floor in hull. Equipment installation and deck fitting, added 1/8” plywood as deck and styrene on top.

Range Safety Launch? by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Evenin' Neville, Re Leak- Where did the water collect? Anywhere near the end of the prop-shafts? Whatever; as soon as it's dried out give it a good internal coating of EzeKote from Deluxe Materials, no pong and no hardener resin. Brush it on generously and leave to dry/harden overnight. Put PLENTY down in the bilges around the keel boards. Brushes you can simply wash out in warm water. Very 'People friendly'👍 After that carefully inspect the outside of the hull for flaked paint, cracks and delamination of the skin or keel wood. Re scale for fittings- "Some of the 1/16th look better than the 1/12th and 1/24 is in with a change for some bits!" Don't quite get the last bit! Whatever 😉 The original was LoA 43' = 516". So your model with 44" is without doubt as near as dammit 1/12. (1 to 11.727😁) Owt else for the fittings would look a bit 'Gulliver's Travels' 😲 Re Build Blogs; the most comprehensive one I've seen here on Fireboats is Robbob's outstanding build and incredibly detailed and informative blog 👍👍👍 https://model-boats.com/builds/view/23951?goto=44797 Can't wait to see what electrics you've ordered, another big white delivery van full of surprises?😁 Bon chance mom ami, Cheers, Doug 😎

Cabin by muddy Admiral   Posted: 1 month ago
Continuing with the cabin, trying to keep it light in weight. The sides and inner former's made up, started on the front windscreen's. Forgot the procedure about cutting the windows and then fitting the veneer, fitted the veneer and had to cut out the windows veneer and 3mm ply all glued up. Once the apertures were marked out, purposely drilled though from the veneer side just trying to avoid any splitting of the veneer, it worked. Fitted the front screens and reinforced the framework with 5 min epoxy, a quick sand down and all was well. Next item was the roof, as i wanted a light as possible upper works decided on .8mm ply, it looked and felt a little fragile, but once the Titebond glue was applyed all held down with elastic bands, also using 3 strips of 3/8" x 1/8" Obechie longitudinally down the top of the cabin roof to help stop ant edge "Barrelling" at formers. Regards Muddy.

Outboards...and then some! by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi all, I don't know if anyone on here is interested. many may even be unaware, but there's a thing called 152VO. Scale 1:5.2 scale models of vintage outboard motor-powered kneeler hydros. It's been around since 2011 as far as I can make out. It is superbly organised with the ultimate point of competition of a friendly kind. VERY popular in Germany and The Netherlands. There are a few kits now available, loads of plans of real boats and a lot of very nice fittings and accesories. There a few outboard motors available which can be fitted with brushless motors if you prefer. The models have to fit a certain mathematical formula, to give choices, but remain reasonably well matched to make for driver skill being more important than money-ruled boats. Kind of the opposite of F1. If you need any help with imagining these things, here's a pic. of a MODEL pits. Right down to the floating moorings. I would SO like to see this take off in Britain. Here's their website. Iffy translation, OK, but pretty much understandable if you don't speak German or Dutch. https://152vo.de/ Cheers, Martin

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Unless described as flat, paint was more often a brighter satin than matt and rarely actual gloss. White will always have been an off white as the components of paints were such that it was not possible to get a really bright white. I know that for a fact as my grandad always made his own and until PEP in the mid 60s (Plastic Emulsion Paint) there was no such thing as brilliant or appliance white. Unfortunately getting an decent off white is not easy these days since Plastikote went acrylic and their previously excellent paints started eating themselves on recoating. I now use enamels exclusively. They are densely pigmented, flexible and modern enamels dry pretty quickly. I am using a black enamel primer on my Crash Tender, which I will then spray with black "gloss" from the same range, which, once thinned with white spirit, will dry a little less than glossy. I still don't have a matt brick red for the undersides, but it can be made matt-ish with a careful rub down with 1000 grit wet and dry used wet and soapy, but be careful not to sand through, so very lightly does it, even 1000 grit can cut well when new. Decks were said to be Cerrux Light Deck Grey, anti-slip, which means a textured surface. That would be darker looking due to the surface texture's way with the light. The cabin sides were described as "smooth", i.e. same as the decks but not anti-slip. The roofs? Well, on Vosper's drawing "white" is crossed through and "Grey" written in. But, some pics do look white, the best pics look darker by a whisker than the sides and the roofs are clearly textured as they show evidence, as do the decks, of filth which will sit in the texture. You choose. NOBODY has yet given us chapter and verse. The fact is, an already very handsome boat looks so very pretty with white roofs. But they too should be off white if you can get it! Good luck. Fittings, btw can be had from SLEC in Watton in white metal. Basically the old Yeoman fittings, masters now owned by IP Engineering who bought them to cast when they owned Vintage Model Boat Company. Now they've sold that to SLEC, but I don't think SLEC have white metal casting facilities, so probably cast by Ivor still. I have just had a set for my birthday and they're excellent. They do need careful cleaning up as in mould lines need to be filed/scraped/sanded to a decent finish and then given good primered surface. No hook though, but it does include nav and riding lights. This site also has masts for sale in plastic, but I made my own in brass as I will the hook and davit. I have also just had a set of crew figures cast from my patterns and they will be available soon...a driver(Helm), a boss with binoculars and a lazy slob laying around in the after cockpit. Needs a roll-up to finish his look. No idea of price yet as don't know how much rubber to mould or resin to cast for a set. Yes, 1/16th scale. All this to finish a model I had 55 years ago! But I reckon it deserves it. Martin

Cabin roofs by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Theoretically this should be a very straight forward process and a change from rubbing down the hull so let’s look at the instructions – what instructions! First of all fit some thin card to the sides of the cabin walls to allow for a clearance fit (cornflakes packet) then some minor trimming of the spars to give an exact ,(not tight) fit across the side supports, I decided to pin each of the parts together as well as epoxy in the joints. I always find the best approach is to use a jig to drill pilot holes for the pins ensuring that the pins do not split the wood and the construction is accurate. The frame is then glued up and placed back in the boat and left to dry next job is to fit the corner strengthening pieces, the easiest way I found was to put a card support for the corners to rest on whilst they set still in the cabin structure. Looking forward I had decided to retain the cabin lids with Neodymium magnets so I machined a slot in the corner pieces underside to house the magnets, to be fitted at a later date. Next job is to fit the roof skins which again will be pinned using the 0.7mm brass pins. The roof skins are now epoxied in place so I need to mark out the position of the secondary panels. Looking at the pieces and the instructions the spacer frames seem to be the same size but I was sure I’d read somewhere that these overhung by 2-3mm, reading Robs blog conformed this to be the case. So some trimming required before fitting and marking out the appropriate position then being glued into position. The mid cabin was assembled in exactly the same way

Spektrum, new, useless... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
As reported elsewhere, I have today received the FlySky RC set and it works...perfectly.....straight outa the box as it's PRE-BOUND! And my dear bride has let me have it before my birthday. Although I still have to wait for the Crash Tender Yeoman fittings kit! I would like to use something old in the Crash Tender as it is old itself, so I guess I'd better have a look at your circuit diagrams Doug,as far as suppression and even ESCs are concerned. I have found 3 ESCs today. One I knew of and 2, WITH their instruction in best Chenglish that I had no memory of! Water -cooled too! I'll send you a photo of them. Cheers, Martin