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>> Home > Tags > fittings

fittings
deck fittings
fitting led
fitting the side skins
fittings
Smit Nederland no 528 by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
Hi brimarboat There are two Billing sites. The link I posted was for the on-line shop, the other site is the manufacturer's site. They do not deal with the public direct and direct you to Amerang (Ripmax) in the UK. http://www.amerang.co.uk/ Hope you can source the fittings Dave

Smit Nederland no 528 by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
Hi Tid, i got some replacement fittings direct from Billings, email them for availability

Smit Nederland no 528 by tidtug Lieutenant   Posted: 13 days ago
I know a few years ago the fittings kit were separate.

Smit Nederland no 528 by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
Hi Brimarboat Just looked on The Billing website http://billingboats-direct.com/ and this model is advertised as: "All fittings included (e.g. position lights, anchors, life-belt, etc.)" They do sell all the electrical bits like motors, couplings, servos and Rc but the fittings should have been in the kit. Not sure of the scale but the measurements suggest 1:32 so you should be able to source suitable fittings. If it was a local shop I would be asking them to provide the missing parts Dave

Smit Nederland no 528 by brimarboat Petty Officer   Posted: 14 days ago
Anyone know where I can get a fittings kit for a Smit Nederland No528 kit, already got the two rudders

Secure the hatches and raise the flags ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
Having spent so much time adding fittings and detail to the removable cabin roofs and hatches the last thing I want is for them to be dislodged and see them sink without trace 😱! Having used some amazingly strong neodymium magnets to hold the foam tanks securely in the rear well I was confident that they would be more than powerful enough to hold the various roofs and hatches in place so I scoured eBay for some suitable sizes and shapes. I settled on two sizes, 25x6x3mm and 12x6x3mm and ordered 10 of each, more than I need but so useful to have in the bits box. A word of caution with these magnets, always slide them apart and avoid letting them crash together as the impact can easily break them into pieces, as I discovered. Thankfully I have some spares ! For the engine roof magnets I made a couple of small plywood brackets into which the larger magnets are fixed with epoxy and these were in turn epoxied onto the inside faces of the engine room walls. The mating magnets were let into the underside of the roof frame and firmly glued in place after double checking the mating polarity and orientation. An identical method was used for the forward cabin roof but using the smaller magnets. For the removable panel in the centre section over the motor I used a single pair of small magnets on the rear edge only as the front of this panel is held under the cabin door in a rebated part of the floor that forms the threshold of the door. I had to fit a small brass handle in the rear of this panel so that I could pull the panel up and away as there is no other means of doing so without, I made a ‘hook tool’ from some brass wire for this purpose. The floor panel in the rear cockpit is secured on it’s rear edge by a pair of the larger magnets, the forward edge being held down by the towing hook bracing stays. The removable hatch in the rear cockpit floor was also fitted with two pairs of the smaller magnets let into the underside of the hatch and the hatch framing of the floor. One of the brass handles that I that had previously set into the hatch was bent up slightly so that I could use my brass ‘hook tool’ to release it from the magnets hold. So now all the roofs and hatches are firmly secured by the concealed magnets and are easily removable without any fiddly catches or fixings and now there’s now very little chance of them coming adrift and disappearing! The final finishing detail are the two RAF ensigns, one on the mast and one on the stern flagstaff. The ensigns were made by Mike Allsop Scale Flags & Ensigns who was very helpful and advised me on the most suitable sizes for the 1:12 scale of my boat. His flags are extremely well made, excellent value for money and look very realistic when flying and fluttering !! Mike can be contacted at: scaleflags@outlook.com or by telephone on 01476 573331 They are hand made from a fine and flexible silk cloth that behaves like a real flag even in a slight breeze and are easy to fix with diluted PVA glue. The smaller flag was fitted to the lanyard on the mast as described in the supplied instruction sheet. The ensign on the stern flagstaff was very carefully formed and glued so that the flag was not fixed in one place and could rotate around the shaft of the flagstaff as this piece screws into a brass fitting on the rear deck and this will ensure that it will always find it’s own position. A small brass ring was formed and glued to the flagstaff below the ensign so it would always stay at the top and not slip down. So, all hatches battened down, flags raised and ready for action. That’s just about everything finished now barring any trimming and ballasting required and is ready for it’s maiden voyage. I hope that all of you that have been following my blog have had as much enjoyment reading about my build as I have had in the building and finishing process 😁 And a big thank you to all that have contributed so much with encouraging comments, suggestions and advice 👏 😍

The electrics, drive & radio by Rookysailor Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 20 days ago
Hi Rob, Many thanks for the info on the filling points, I did get a set of white metal fittings from Mike at VMW, but did not get an info sheet as to where they go,Mike kindly supplied me with many information sheets though, now I see yours, I will amend my Fireboat, but still not as perfect as yours,excellent workmanship.

Building a deck by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 30 days ago
I began laying the deck on April 5th. It had snowed as recently as the week before, but it finally warmed up enough to use glue. The strips were cut to 6-5/8" length, about 20' in 1:36 scale. I used a black marker on two opposite sides to represent the pitch in the seams. The deck was laid in a 5-plank pattern to mix up the butt-joints as much as I could. My research on her decking found she's had various styles and plank widths over her life. The earliest photo showing her deck that I could find, showed it straight planked with 7 or 8" wide boards based on the number of planks between her waterway and the main hatch coaming. Her waterway logs seem to be placed ON the decking, as there's no margin planks or joggling - even today. The planking was set with gel CA. Gorilla sells it in a nice bottle with a metal pin in the cap to keep the spout open. It would up taking 3 of these bottles to complete the deck. The planks are cut at a 45 on the ends along the fore and aft access hatches, to try and hide this seam as much as possible. Once the deck was down, I scraped it. The glue is more resistant than the basswood is, so sanding would have scalloped the wood between seams. Scraping makes everything level. Some lite sanding, more to polish than remove anything, was done last. I had planned to stain the deck a very light grayish tint, but an active naval vessel gets holy-stoned regularly and wouldn't be gray as the ships that sit at a dock today are. In all it took 455 pieces to complete the deck and there wasn't any scrap longer than 1 inch left over. In all I have 3/4" deck beams, 1/4" plywood, a layer of 4oz cloth and resin, and a 3/16" basswood deck - I don't recall why I designed it so heavy, but it certainly doesn't hurt the model at all, and I think the 3/16" square strip will prove to have been easier to set than the 1/16" x 1/4" planks Pride and Macedonian will get. The deck go a coat of water-based satin poly, and I stared working on hatch coamings, cap log, and waterways. The cabin skylight and two hatched forward of it, including the capstan, and all combined into one hatch where the battery is accessed, and which hides the aft ballast rod and main power switch. The cap logs Are 1/2" wide x 1/4" tall basswood that was tren'led, glued, and copper nailed, onto the deck, flush with the outside of the hull covering this seam completely. The the angled wood waterways were installed around the inside of the cap log, and the deck got a coat of oil-based satin poly. This actually leeched in and made the marker seams bleed a little. In hind sight, I think I'll go with paint over marker for seams in the future. The coamings got painted black. I'm not sure why the Navy painted deck fittings black. It was even common to paint to top surfaces of tops black. I wonder how many injuries and losses this cost the navy that white paint would have prevented. Anyway... Constellation didn't have "solid" bulwarks, but rather she had hammock irons bolted to her cap log. These were removed when Baltimore tried to pass her off as a frigate and tossed in the bilge. When the ship was restored as a sloop of war, they found all but one. These irons are designed to have wooden rails at their tops, inboard and out, and have holes so several lines can be run through them. The Navy in it's wisdom though, decided to wainscot them to appear as solid bulwarks, despite the additional splinter hazard that would be in battle. I wasn't making all those metal stanchions just to hide them under wood and tarps, so I made wood blocks sheathed in sheet bass, scribed to look like vertical wainscotting. It was the end of April by now, and the Baltimore Port Expo was in two weeks. I wanted to have hammocks in the bulwarks, as she appears in the portrait, but there was no time to figure this out, so I layered on some balsa and shaped it so it looked like tarps were laid over the hammocks. When I figure out how I'll represent the stowed hammocks, I can pull the balsa off easily enough. The bulwarks on, I made some fittings for the spencer masts; installed the eye bolts at the base of the masts; made some bollards (or whatever name they gave those posts), made and installed the catheads, which are laminated 1/16" basswood. I then started setting up a jury rig and her controls so she could sail at the Port Expo. I set her t'gallants and all three heads'ls this time around. By the night before the Expo, she was ready to go.

The suction hoses – part 4. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
After test fitting the hose ends to establish the correct lengths the hoses were trimmed to size and the fittings were then glued into the hose ends with some epoxy. On the real boat the hoses are arranged to lay on the tops of the foam tanks and they are supported on the stern coaming by a bronze hook. I formed this hook from some brass sheet so that it holds the hoses firmly one above the other, this was primed and finished in gunmetal grey and fixed to the coaming with a couple of brass rivets and a spot of epoxy. For a bit of extra security I cut some large diameter heat shrink to form some bands around the hoses to hold them together. So now the hoses are all finished and I think they look really good, I’ll probably re-polish the brass fittings and apply a light coat of lacquer to keep them nice and shiny at a later stage 😎

what fittings for a plane prop by octman Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Thanks Dave. Certainly got a weed problem, so will give them a call. Chris

The suction hoses – part 3. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
The remaining hose fittings are the male & female connectors and fortunately require nothing more than drilling to take the four short brass ‘turning handles’ which were soft soldered in place and then filed to length. The suction hoses themselves proved far more difficult to make to a satisfactory standard and after several experiments with different gauges of copper, steel and stainless steel wire I found a 1.25mm galvanised ‘garden wire’ that proved malleable enough to be formed into a long coil spring that when covered with some black heat shrink tube looked OK. I used a length of 8mm diameter aluminium tube as a former and hand wound the galvanised wire tightly around the tube to form a spring. This was a painful process, quite literally, and caused blisters on my thumb and forefingers despite wearing protective gloves 😭 The springs were then stretched out on the rod to space the coils evenly and then drawn through the heat shrink tube, and then a heat gun used to shrink down the tube onto the springs. While the newly formed hoses were still warm and pliable I put them on a former with the correct curvature and applied a little more heat and then left them to cool and set. The hoses were made over length so that, when finished, I could trim them to the correct lengths to fit into the rear well of the boat with the fittings attached. See part 4 for the final assembly...coming soon.

what fittings for a plane prop by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Chris and Sonar I bought mine at the Blackpool Show and Brian offered me the top at the same time. I believe he intends to make a part kit in time and the top I and my friend have were from the development stage. Perhaps if you give them a ring and speak to Ann or Brian they will also sell you the top. Certainly makes for a strong boat and is relatively quick to build if you have model aircraft experience. There are running formers on the base so they help keep the model relatively straight in the water. Great fun especially if there is no wind for the yachts or the weed is being problematic. Dave

what fittings for a plane prop by sonar Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Well that was my next question...

what fittings for a plane prop by octman Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Ref Dave M's airboat pics, did they come with the hull and the deck, or did you make the deck yourself? Mobile Marine only seem to sell the hull, and the two boats in your photos appear to have the same decks. Chris

what fittings for a plane prop by sonar Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
I was thinking along the same sort of boat So far as the drone goes that's about the starting price