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>> Home > Tags > fittings

fittings
deck fittings
fitting led
fitting the side skins
fittings
HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
Back to the build. Next milestone, to complete the superstructure and engine covers. The superstructure is essentially a cowl that supports the open bridge and serves as the air intake for the gas turbines. The engine covers fit into the rear of it. The superstructure is full of curves and will be interesting to make. Still trying to save weight, decided to make it out of glassfibre. Rather than first make a plug then a female mould and finally the cowl, wanted to try the technique of making a plug out of styrene foam sheet, then covering it in a glass fibre matt. Once the glass fibre is set, the foam is dissolved out using a solvent and the cowl remains – Inshallah! To ensure the foam did not react to the glass fibre resin, painted the finished cowl with enamel paint before sticking the matt down. See pictures. What a mess! The resin had crept under the paint and into the foam dissolving it. When the resin dried the plug had shrunk slightly and had the surface finish of a quarry. First thought was to hurl it and start again, this time in wood. On second thoughts, wondered if the plug could still be used. Decided to build it up with wood filler and from it make a female mould, as originally intended. The cowl would then be made from the mould. Built the damaged plug up and sanded it smooth. As the plug would be covered in fibreglass, the surface finish was not critical. Brushed a coat of fibreglass on the plug and, after drying filled any defects with glaze putty and sanded smooth. Once the finish and dimensions were satisfactory, applied a thicker coat of glass fibre to the plug. This was again smoothed down, waxed with carnauba polish and then covered in mould release. From it the cowl was made. Picture shows plug, mould and cowl placed side by each. The cowl requires reinforcement; the fittings and various mountings then adding before installing. A trial installation showed that it fitted properly the deck and was accurate. A lesson for the next time is to make the plug and mould much deeper than the finished item. That will allow any rough edges, on either the mould or the component, to be trimmed off leaving a smooth fibreglass edge.

Vosper RAF Crash Tender by RobbieMcKennan Petty Officer   Posted: 18 days ago
I recently bought this boat as a part built project. It was started by the previous owner in 1973 but then put in the attic in 1974 and stayed there till this year. Sadly many of the plastic parts have become very brittle or are missing so having to source replacements plus the fittings were made to british standards and are now made in metric sizes, but getting there slowly

Elizabeth Cabin/superstructure by muddy Admiral   Posted: 19 days ago
The cabin has now been finished off with a well deck, the well deck is made of balsa mostly, and the floor is oly, the well deck floor is lined as planks ( urghh ), firstly scored with a blunt Stanley type knife blade the the plank lines infilled with pencil, the floorboard nail marks are just scored with a sharp pin with a little cyno rubbed in the hole to colour the pin prick, decided to make this as an all in one removal unit, It still has to be glazed and fittings plus furniture, as in windscreen , door's consul etc: .. The deck and all other woodwork has been varnished and the cabin roof painted white, awaiting suitable weather to paint the hull, as this is done outdoors.. Muddy....

Boat shaft connectors (which stuffs to use and which is good) by DodgyGeezer Lieutenant   Posted: 21 days ago
1 - I concur with figtree7nts. You don't want a long length of unsupported floppy tube transmitting power. You will see that my illustrations show the unsupported tube to be very short. 2 - You also want thick tube to transmit power. if you have thin 2-3mm tube that will easily kink. I make my own connectors at the ends of each shaft to bring the internal tube diameter up to about 6-8mm. 3 - If you want to try a quick fix for what you have, I would suggest putting a small piece of wood or plastic inside the unsupported section of your tube, which will stop it collapsing when it is twisted. This may work if the torque is not high. And it's a quick, cheap thing to try. 4 - if you want to try making your own, you could get something like this - check the correct shaft size - https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Brass-Hexagon-Flexible-Coupling-C... or this: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Coupling-Inserts-for-RC-Models-Va... and then buy a length of something like this - https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1M-Food-Grade-Clear-Translucent-S... checking the diameters that you need, of course... Here is a similar Eezebilt to your craft. It's the OSA Missile boat. You can see that the unsupported length of silicone is short, and this boat at 32 inches takes quite a lot of power...

Mast fittings by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 25 days ago
I've sailed and re-rigged small full scale yachts and catamarans all my life and never seen a fitting like that. Perhaps it was put there as a halyard or stay 'tidy' for storage purposes? looks more like an upside down boat cover tie down clip or part of a latch. Perhaps try the door and lock section at your local hardware super store. Found this on google. As the other guys have said though, probably hand made. Usually, no rigging fittings on yachts have square edges unless they are part of a fitting.

Mast fittings by unknowndna Seaman   Posted: 27 days ago
Thanks for the ideas guys. I'll probably try and find a two horn cleat like you suggested, though finding one I can blind screw in at two points is proving a little more difficult. Like you said, it's looking like a handmade fixture. I suspect the whole boat, including all the fixtures were hand made. The joys of buying second hand.

Mast fittings by steve-d Commander   Posted: 28 days ago
I'm in the process of researching running and standing rigging for a boat of mine. I've not seen one of those anywhere so I suspect it is hand made. Closest i've seen. https://www.cornwallmodelboats.co.uk/cgi-bin/sh000001.pl?WD=...

Mast fittings by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
Looks like a simple 'Jam cleat', roughly half a normal Horn cleat. On a mast a form of Shroud cleat. Look in the Fittings section of any good model shop, e.g. Cornwall Model Boats. If all else fails just buy a normal two horn cleat and saw/file one horn off. Simple enough to make though. 😎

Mast fittings by unknowndna Seaman   Posted: 28 days ago
Thanks, that's great, but doesn't answer the question at all. Your lovely diagram fails to note the metal hook above the spreader on my photo and it's that that I would like to know the technical name of and where to buy them.

Mast fittings by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
Hope this helps I no expert but wikipedia explains it. Standing rigging on a fore-and-aft rigged sailboat. Key: 1. Forestay 2. Shroud 3. (Spreaders) 4. Backstay 5. Inner forestay 6. Sidestay 7. (Boom) 8. Running backstays

Mast fittings by unknowndna Seaman   Posted: 28 days ago
Can anyone tell me the technical name for the hook-like piece of metal on this mast and where to buy one from? It's approximately 24mm long by 6mm wide. I've tried searching for forestay hooks and jib hooks but nothing seems to come close to a match.

The wheelhouse navigation light. by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
This is a small item but very visible on the wheelhouse and since the standard for this item has been set I have to follow suit. So first of all get some 3mm blue LEDs ordered and then it’s on with preparing the white metal body. I used by hand as suggested a series of drills increasing in diameter until 3.1 dia was reached but only 2/3 down the length from the front the smaller hole (1.5mm) was bored right through for the wires to exit. Arrival of the LEDs, first check the LED using my power supply, just over 3 volts seems to illuminate to the correct level. Next was to remove the shoulder on its plastic casing so the whole body does not exceed 3mm over its length and lightly abrade the outside to give a diffused light. Next cut the LED legs to 2mm from the plastic casing noting which is positive, next prepare the wires. I used Futaba servo wire cable 22awg which is very flexible and with the white signal wire stripped off leaving a red and black wire. These were tinned and cropped to 2mm and then quickly soldered to the appropriate terminal. Next check the LED still works! first hurdle over, I now needed to check the that when the LED goes into the body it doesn’t short out so checking the diameter over the widest part which is over the soldered terminals this was 0.1 below 3mm. I decided that shrink sleeve was too thick so I mixed some epoxy resin and coated all around the terminals, this proved to be satisfactory in both non-conductivity and dimensionally. Now the final test, using some aliphatic wood glue I slid the LED into the body whilst it was illuminated as it was a tight push fit, bingo it’s still lit – leave to set. I used aliphatic glue, as it would be easier to remove should I ever have to change the LED. The body still needs painting white but this will be done with all the other fittings at a later stage.

36" Thames River Police Launch by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Rookeysailor. The kit is, I understand, due for release by Vintage Model Works any time now. I think that they are awaiting some of the white metal fittings from the manufacturer that are included in the kit. RE: price, probably best to contact Mike Cummings at VMW to confirm the above and the pricing. rolfman2000. I'm afraid you'll still need to carve the bow, but I bet you can get a better result than uncle Cyril now! I hope you enjoy my blog. Robbob.

36" Thames River Police Launch by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
After the successful build of the ‘Vintage Model Works’ RAF Crash Rescue Tender I was asked by Mike Cummings of VMW if I would undertake to build a prototype of their new model with the aim of checking the construction method and the assembly instructions for accuracy before the kit is put into production. The model is a ‘Thames River Police Launch’ and is based on the original design by Phil Smith for the Veron company, this was a very popular model kit in the late 50’s and 60’s and sold for the princely sum of 43 shillings and tuppence, approximately £2.15 in today’s money but an equivalent cost of £48.50 in 1960. This design has been updated to accommodate electric propulsion and radio control by Colin Smith, the son of the original designer and it has been re-scaled to be 36” in length where the original was 24” which gives much more scope for detailing and provides more ‘hiding room’ for the drive, control systems and all the associated wiring. The kit produced by VMW uses the same construction techniques as the original and the materials are a combination of balsa and plywood both of which a laser and CNC cut for precision. The ply and balsa materials supplied are of very high quality as one would expect from VMW and all the stripwood for the chines, rubbing strakes and deck detailing is included, even the dowel required for the mast is in the box, very comprehensive! The kit also includes white metal fittings such as the fairleads and stanchions, and the searchlight and horns. The glazing for the windows comes in the kit too. The instruction sheet supplied is in need of revision as it is largely taken directly from the original as written by Phil Smith and some of the terminology needs updating, for instance the ply bottom and side skins are referred to as ‘strakes’ but I understand that a re-write of the instructions is in hand along with an updated plan showing the best positioning for the motor, prop-shaft, battery, ESC, receiver, rudder and servo. During construction I have added a few additional pieces of ply or balsa as reinforcement or supports and substituted some balsa parts for ply where I thought a stronger material would be better. I also added some hatches to give access to the wiring at the bow and the rudder & servo at the stern but largely I have not gone ‘off plan’ to any extent. The pictures show the model in it’s present state (Nov 2018) and is ready for painting and finishing.

Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc.... by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
I think Hydrogen Peroxide is the active ingredient in Vanish and the like. It is regarded as "The Safe Bleach" in the cleaning products industry. It remains active on cleaned surfaces for up to 72 hrs.Hypochlorite types only for as long as you can smell them. It is safe to use on just about any surface or fabric and mixed with a small amount of say washing up liquid it will clean body fats from baths and showers and other fats from cookers and work surfaces. Also removes mould etc. It produces no toxic fumes and is safe on the skin. I worked for a company called Environmental Chemicals who were devoted to safer cleansing alternatives. You would be amazed at it's effect on a previously washed bread board. I won't list all they made but the one with the HP in it was very popular with industry and the public. I could identify most of their chemicals used by smell and Hydrogen Peroxide was one. Well not so much a smell but it's action on my nasal passages. Likewise with gas fire and boiler fumes. A very handy thing to have when I was plumbing/gas fitting. Anyway back to the point. You can bleach your sails safely with it as often as you like to make them as white (or_ grey) as you like. It also shifts grime from painted/varnished wood and metals. A mention was made by someone (Westie ?)of metal masts etc on a star Yacht. I thought all Star yachts had all wooden masts and spars. I knew the Denyes.Jean-Jacques in particular and was allowed into the hallowed halls once or twice but didn't see everything. I was told that after the war wood was in short supply and old mangle rollers that were made with apple wood were sought and used . I am waiting to get back on my feet to restore the two yachts I was given for my two boys at that time.Around '67/68. Only the smaller unnamed ones. I don't know what no they are. I've already made a mast for one but all metal fittings will need cutting out afresh and new suits of sails acquired. Regarding sails. Handkerchiefs are too fine a material to allow recovery in a blow down. They don't allow the water out so keep the yacht flat. Anyone know of an alternative solution? Sorry to go on but I hope this diatribe has been helpful to someone.👍