Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
December 2018: 4 people
November 2018: 11 people
October 2018: 9 people
September 2018: 13 people
August 2018: 5 people
July 2018: 8 people
June 2018: 8 people
May 2018: 7 people
April 2018: 24 people
March 2018: 11 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (18)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > former

former
transformer
former
Upper & Lower Chines by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
The next stage is to assemble and fit the upper and lower chines to the bulkhead formers. Each chine is made from three parts that are step jointed together, the instructions recommend using the plan to ensure correct alignment with a protective transparent paper between, however the cutting accuracy of the parts is such that having checked the alignment over the plan I was confident that assembling and glueing them together on the cutting mat would be OK. The upper chines were assembled first and when set were glued and pinned to the tops of the bulkhead formers with the fronts butting against the K1 keel former at the prow. The lower chines were assembled in the same fashion and when dry are glued and set into the slots in the bulkhead formers. Finally the stern former F7 is added and the whole assembly set aside to dry. The hull is quickly taking shape now and even at this stage is very rigid and yet remarkably light.

Assembling the keel & adding bulkhead formers. by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Now Plank on frame really sets my imagination going, I have to say that i am a builder rather than a sailor and get immense pleasure from problem solving and just creating structures. I will be looking for a suitable subject after the Crash Tender which at the moment is taking some time with fiddly bits that don't seem to advance the the overall vision of the project so apologies for the lack of "blog" Any suggestions?

Assembling the keel & adding bulkhead formers. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Hi Mike. The majority of Phil Smith's Veron designs were around this principle, just as the Aerokits/KeilKraft designs were based on the 'egg crate' method. Both methods are very successful and popular over the years as many modellers will attest, and the hull can be completed really quite quickly. 'Plank on frame' is probably as common if not more and a great deal more time consuming but far better able to reproduce complex hull shapes. Never tried the latter..perhaps one day.

Assembling the keel & adding bulkhead formers. by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
Looking good although I had not seen the method of building round a box before, it takes some time before the shape of the craft can be seen.

Assembling the keel & adding bulkhead formers. by rolfman2000 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Coming along nicely Robbob. As the saying goes "Don't talk to me about balsa bow blocks" 😆 And yes, you don't have to do those yet lol. I may just follow you with one of these to run alongside my original Veron one from 1966/7. Hope they have them for sale soon . Best wishes, Dave W 😊

Assembling the keel & adding bulkhead formers. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
With the box assembled and the glue fully cured the next stage is to glue the inner keel parts together and fix it to the underside of the box. The keel consists of four pieces that need to be jointed whilst on a flat surface, the instructions suggest that the parts are best assembled whilst laid over the plan with a transparent protective sheet between to ensure accurate alignment. A gap is left in the keel for the prop shaft and this gap is laminated over by some additional keel pieces on either side. I chose to deviate from the instructions here and fit these pieces after the prop shaft was in place to ensure a snug fit, I have it on order from Model Boat Bits along with the prop and rudder. The assembled keel is glued in place along the centre line of the inverted box and when dry the bulkhead formers can be added. The positions of all the formers are clearly marked on the box and the underside formers are added first followed by the side formers and lastly the bow formers, and the assembly set aside to dry. I’d almost forgotten how easy it is to work with balsa, it takes glue and pins readily and assembling this model is a joy, however, shaping the solid balsa bow blocks to the correct profiles will be an interesting challenge. But I don’t need to do that for a while yet.

Elizabeth by muddy Admiral   Posted: 13 days ago
Sorry chaps but canna remember how far into this build we progressed.. But hoping not to bore you, the decks were added, in Walnut planks 5mm x 3mm, edges lined with beech, ( this I named Bendy Beech ) it has been treated and one can tie this in a knot, no need for steaming or water soaking just apply glue and tack it down or clamp it until glue dries. BUT-it aint cheap.. Made a start on the cabin upperworks, this is veneered 3mm ply. Basic innards construction with formers trying to make it as light as possible. More to follow.. Muddy..

My other hobby by boaty Admiral   Posted: 13 days ago
Good to see other PPLs and former PPLs on the Model Boats website. I took mine at Liverpool Airport known now as JLA (John Lennon Airport) in June 1984 and completed it in January 85. Trained with Liverpool Flying School aka Keenair in Cherokee 140s and a PA 38 Tomahawk. Later I moved into Air Nova which was also a Liverpool club and the actor Lewis Collins was also a member of that Club. At the time I was a member of Merseyside IVC (Inter Varsity Club) thus had plenty of passengers. One of them was Victoria Field, my former psychology lecturer who later became famous as a psychologist and writer. Eventually Air Nova moved to Hawarden Airport near Chester but the Club folded shortly after. I then joined the in house Club based at the field and I ceased flying in November 2016. Best flights were going over Snowdon VFR and down the Dee Valley. I also flew over Colwyn Bay to have a look at the boating lake though I haven't sailed there. I also saw the lakes at Llandudno West Shore and LLanfairfechan. The latter I am considering for sailing my fast electrics. Downside to PPL flying was the crosswind component of the aircraft being 17 knots , At Hawarden there is only one runway the 04/22 and Liverpool the 09/27. I did have to cancel many times due to this. Thankfully sailing model boats is much more enjoyable as we don't have that many snags to deal with and if the motor stops we don't have to do an emergency landing.😎😁😁 Boaty

Constructing 'The Box' by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Phil Smith, the original designer of the Thames River Police Launch, based the construction on a rigid box structure around which bulkhead formers are fixed to give the hull it’s shape, a design feature of many of the Veron kits. In the Vintage Model Works kit all the components of this box are laser cut and require no additional trimming before assembly, I have used Titebond 2 aliphatic glue throughout the construction as it bonds wood very firmly and dries quickly too. I started by joining the edges of the two sheets of balsa that form the base of the box, these were held firmly together with some scrap wood and weighted down on the cutting mat and left to dry. Meanwhile the box sides were similarly glued together taking care that the two pieces that form each box side are in perfect alignment using the laser etched vertical lines that mark the bulkhead former positions, these were also wedged together and weighted while the glue set. Once the bottom and sides are dry the ends can be added to complete the box construction, a try-square was used to check the box for accuracy and everything was held together with some ‘push pins’ while the glue set. As this box forms the foundation of the hull it’s essential that there’s no twist or anything out of square. This was all done in one evening, clearly the assembly of this kit could be completed quite rapidly if you really wanted too!

PS Waverley by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Doug I will PM David. Been busy all day dealing with casting problems on the wheels of the Vincent and making dozens of dummy nuts'n'bolts. I would have thought you'd have used Modelling Timbers for pre-drilled stanchions. His prices were so low, but now, alas, he's gone. I would probably make a little jig to drill the cast stanchions. I think boredom would set in before I broke a drill, but you're bang on about hand held minidrills. They go too fast and cannot be held really firmly. I use mine for cutting and grinding, shaping and polishing. I have a very small pillar drill with a buggy motor adapted to hold a small Jacobs chuck and run off a variable transformer. Today I drilled 40 1mm holes in the pattern for the Vincent rear wheel to assist the mould maker. All went very well. Cheers, Martin

Voltage increasing via regulator by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
A somewhat confused question if I may say so Eric!😲 You can't 'regulate up' only down. The regulator's job is to produce a constant lower voltage from a range of higher voltages. I often use one to produce 5V for the RX and servos from a 12V SLA drive battery. A little 3 legged device (type LM7805) which looks just like the power FETs in a high current ESC. My version of a UBEC! 😉 What is this 'regulator' you have? Type number? Manufacturer? Photo? To get 12V from 7.2V you would need to use a Voltage converter (also known as an inverter). This works by converting the DC input from the battery to an AC voltage which can then be increased using a transformer. More elegant (and expensive!) versions use a transistor oscillator and amplifier. This uses hi-power transistors instead of the transformer. The AC output of the transformer (or amplifier) is then rectified back to DC. All this is very inefficient which is why it is normally only used for very light currents, where the losses are not so significant, and when there is no other alternative, not often the case! You can't beat the physics and you will never get the same power out that you put in. This leads to a basic design question:- What is the total current consumption of the load? I.e. the motors. A simple example:- Let's say that at 7.2V the motors draw 10Amps total, i.e. 72W (or VAmps). Assuming a utopian 100% efficiency at 12V this would equate to 6A. Due to the three stages of conversion; DC to AC, transformation / amplification of AC to 12V, AC back to DC, you'll probably be lucky to get an efficiency of around 60% to 70%. Thus if you stick 720W in you'll get around 430 to 504W out. Not much of a gain is it!🤔 Your battery would be exhausted in about 2/3 the time it is now 😡 If your motors draw more than 10A the problem just gets worse. So what is it you really want to do? If you just want to up the volts to your motors stick a 12V SLA or an 11.1V LiPo (3S) in and hope that you don't cook your motors! Frankly I don't really know why you're bothering, tugs aren't sprinters! If you want more pulling power with the existing setup try experimenting with prop sizes and pitch. Will probably achieve much more than fiddlin' about with voltage converters. BTW: All this assumes that the RX has it's own separate 5V battery supply or from a BEC in the ESC. Some clarification needed from your side. Cheers, Doug 😎

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
The weather has quickly turned colder, giving an excuse to get back to this model. Stripped out much of the interior and the prop. shafts to replace the nylon propellers with brass. These items all needed removing for painting, so decided to paint the hull before reassembly and then moving onto the superstructure. Fortunately, examining similar naval vessels and several U Tube videos, confirmed the hull as light grey, the deck a darker one of the 50 shades of grey and the lower hull below the waterline black. Used thin Tamiya masking tape to define clean colour separations, followed by regular tape, masked the hull into colour sections and sprayed using “rattle” cans. After the colours applied a light overall Matt coat to subdue any shine. The results are satisfactory. Will now reassemble and move onto building the superstructure and the other fittings. Prior to the season closing decided to experiment with my new Flysky Tx/Rx package, shortly to be fitted to this model. This Tx has a servo limiting function, which was hoping could also be used to restrict ESC output. Would like to make the full speed motor response correspond to full Tx control position. Currently can over power the model; which lifts the stern, causing it to come off the plane and then dig the bow in. Was thinking that if full throttle could be set at around 90% forward control movement and 40% sternwards the model would retain adequate performance, but without being overpowered or very sensitive to control lever movement. As the Brave was not available, tried the idea on my Daman Stan 4207 model. This is brushed motor powered and a good performer. Obviously the settings for the Brave will be different, but at least could try to see if the idea would work – it did! This Tx function is easy to use and adjustments can be made whilst the model is on the water. Once the ideal settings are achieved they can be programmed and then retained in the Tx. Will try this on the Brave when back on the water next Spring.

Styrene Allergy? by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Styrene fumes? You'll only get fumes if you heat it. My chum works a vac-former to make model car glazing and he thoroughly washes every sheet of PVC before forming it. Stops micro-bubbles forming. I use blue nitriles when epoxying. I always found latex melted on contact with most of the things I used, like enamel paint, Marineflex, etc. Nitriles stay put. Martin

Speranza 03 by muddy Admiral   Posted: 3 months ago
Hello Gerhard, and thank you for the interest. Unfortunately Speranza is on hold and no building has taken place since the last photo update. The reason being i foolishly did not follow protocol with the Spruce chine stringers, and fitted or attempted to fit them as a solid, instead of laminating. A short while after they were pinned and glued they sprang and cracked on the bow formers. This will be repairable with a laminate behind or inside the stringer then shape as drawing. At the moment i have near completion a Gentleman's Cruiser named Elizabeth.. There is a blog on her.. Speranza is a nice build and should be a good all weather sailor. If you are building her, good luck and please send in photographs.. Regards Muddy

A return to the hobby! by boaty Admiral   Posted: 3 months ago
SLEC do have a good reputation and its great that the classic kits of old are back in production. The Sea Commander is one of my favourites as I restored one many years ago but foolishly sold it to fund my karting activities four years later. However in 2011 I found another one and restored that. This one I am keeping along with the 34 inch Crash Tender of 1962 vintage that I restored in 2014 being one that the former owner was about to place in a skip. I am interested in a Sea Rover as its a boat I never had. In the early 1960s when we lived in Liverpool, dad would take us up to Fleetwood to see the Aerokits display and watch the steering event on the big lake. Nostalgia aint what it used to be. Boaty😆