Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
June 2018: 5 people
May 2018: 7 people
April 2018: 24 people
March 2018: 13 people
February 2018: 8 people
January 2018: 25 people
December 2017: 7 people
November 2017: 11 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (8)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > former

former
transformer
former
Charging NiMhs, one for Doug?... by Wingcoax Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 days ago
"Heat getting ridder" Just what you don't want your craft to do "SINK" Wall wart is usually used to describe any plug-in charger or transformer i;e;crimbo lights.

Wheels by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
May be someone may want to make paddles using this method. If you do & you have a lathe should be no problems. First turn wooden blanks & mark centre & number of spokes required. Rap strip brass around the former cut & join to a tight fit. it is important as this will keep them the same size. Align the drill accurately to the spokes. Drill one & pin it with a short piece of spoke material, so the strip doesn't move wile drilling rest. The centre hub was divided in the lathe. On assemble three spokes in my case immediately aligned the rings, that is if the holes are right. If not fettling is the order of the day. I soft soldered mine as the structure is inherently strong. Note soldered away from the marks on blanks, to preserve them. The dishing can be seen on the finished upright wheel. This was achieved by a thick washer under the hub, & clamping the outer ring down on to the former. I did try bending the spokes before fitting. But had trouble as the rings didn't align automatically. Clean up by hand. Only Three more to make.

Wheels by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
I though I had posted about wheels but cant find it. so am repeating. I have cut wheel from aluminium plate in the past. This is a waste & a tedious job. This time I am building them up with strip & rod. Wooden formers turned up for inner & outer rims. Strip raped around & Joint soldered. then holes drilled for the spokes. A hub tuned & drilled, the accurate holes have aligned every thing in the right position. One ready for soldering. Inner wheel almost flat. Outer dished to stop lateral movement. Spokes marked in red from board for bends.

Gunwhale rubbing strakes by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
Gunwhale rubbing strakes As these pieces will be under stress they need to be steamed into shape prior to fitting so out with the wallpaper stripper and modified tube (1/4 BSP fitting in the bottom of an old piece of IKEA cloths rail).For the gunwhale strakes I used the same former as I used for the stringers so 20 mins in the steamer then into the jig for 2 days drying. The chine rubbing strakes will need a different jig but this time a left and right hand version as not only do they bend round but also up at the bow. I was however disappointed with the quality of the 3/16 square obeche as the grain was nearly at 45 degrees to its length – it snapped before I started to bend it, just pushing it into the jig I bought some better pieces from the local model shop. I temporally fitted the gunwhale rubbing strake slightly proud of the deck level in order to drill all the pin holes then remove and mix up some epoxy, coat the length and hook into the brass bow and start tapping in the pins along the length of the boat, repeat on the port side. Chine rubbing strakes are still in the jig!

Sloop Gypsy by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Improvements: Added weight to keel Removed all silicone from deck and port holes Cut off former cabin and replaced with fully tape sealing cabin Changes to sheet line exit Plus more

Bits n pieces arrived / Aft Deck Mk 2 built ;-) by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
6mm lime wood planks from Krick and 4mm tap from Conrad arrived on Wednesday so Full Speed Ahead. This time formers were made from the 6mm lime so no bending or slitting required, new piece of mahogany cut so that this time no inserts left an right were needed. 😊 Formers attached using Rocket cyano and a bag of clamps and left overnight. The 'Riva' tank filler caps were tapped 4mm and appropriate holes bored in the deck piece. Neodymium magnets attached to forward edge. Deck fitted and trimmed in situ for flush fit all round. Transom got scratched during this process so will need a respray🤔 Underside sealed with two coats of EzeKote and sealing / varnishing / lacquering process started on the topside. Last two pics show current status; So Far So Good.😉 Next step; fit windows made of 3mm green tinted acrylic 'glass', which also arrived Wednesday. Will now have to start thinking about what to do in the cockpit 😲 All I have so far is a 25mm ship's wheel. Furniture building is not exactly my Forte! First time for everything I suppose! Suggestions gratefully received!! Ciao for now, Doug 😎 Almost forgot! While waiting for varnish to dry I tackled an old problem with the rudder. Namely; asymmetric rudder throw caused by the rather bulky connecting rod binding on the rudder arm! Suddenly remembered I still had some E-Z Connectors from old aircraft days. Been hanging around for 35 years or so waiting for something to do! So replaced the old plastic linkage with 1mm spring steel rod and two E-Z connectors. Works a treat 😊

After Deck / Hatch - If at first you don't succeed ... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Evenin' MT, Go to the Top of the Class! 👍 I came to the same conclusion so I built Mk2 like the Proverbial Brick S..t House 😲 Pics 1 & 2. In the meantime my 6mm lime boards had arrived from Krick so this time I cut formers and didn't bend or slit anything so it's good an' rigid 😊 Pic 3 clamping, Pic 4 trial fit prior to final trimming, Pic 5current status; 3 coats pore filler, 2 coats Lord Nelson gloss varnish flattened with 3000 grit. Still a little way to go, CU tomorrow, Cheers Doug 😎 BTW: had never thought of filling the slits, 🤓 damn good tip, must remember that 👍👍 Could come in handy on my HMS Manxman build - last pic is from the the Deans Marine instructions for the hull preparation! Reckon I can do it a bit neater 😉

Roof Skins by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
do it!! I regretted it the minute I had finished my 4 footer. So this is a 3 foot boat, glass hull (cant remember where it came from) the rest is scratch. Superstructure plastic, with ply formers etc, virtually all fittings hand made from brass. Davit worked, windows opened (inc rear ones) and so on. Sadly he passed away prior to paint, so I finished it, and returned to his wife in a glass box.

Roof Skins by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Having sorted the windows out, they can now wait until the detailing is finished before final fitting. The roof skins are all compound curves so they will need to be steamed and formed before fitting as they will definitely have to hold their shape as there isn’t as much to fasten them to in terms of framework. After final fitting I will glass both inner and outer faces which will ensure the shape is retained and also help strengthen them to withstand any bumps /knocks during its lifetime. I made formers out of some softwood to match each of the roof profiles. Each piece was then soaked in hot water for around 5 mins and then clamped on the formers and left to dry for a day or so.

HMS HOOD by Trumpeter by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Peter, 'Hellgrau' is German for light grey. And DKM means Deutsche Kriegs-Marine. UA603 /DKM50 is in the Set 1 that you have. I also have the Lifecolor Set 1 (Surface Ships) and also the Set 2, Cammo colours, these are for my U-Boat. Attached is a colour chart of the former White Ensign Colour Coats naval paints, now sold by Sovereign Hobbies in UK. See 'KM01 Hellgrau 50'. So if the Lifecolor set runs out you can restock from them 😊👍 Happy spraying, cheers Doug 😎 BTW: Re 'Collection'! that was only the half of it😲 I've started an Excel 'Stash Log' to keep track, I should live so long to build them all - I've come to regard some as an investment as many are originals and rare 😉 Did I mention Cambletown, German Narvik destroyer, T45 and Illustrious in 1/350 and a Fletcher class at 1/144, Scharnhorst at 1/400 ?? 😁 NTM the original Revell 1/72 Flower Class, and a whole box load of PE to go with it - much more than is in the later 'Premium' version 😉

Thanks for a warm welcome by CB90 Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
I Have just joined the Darlington & District Model Boat Club on Wednesday 14th March 2018. What a great bunch of lads. The club house is on the sites of a Victorian former reservoir which is about 88m x 85 m and about 2m deep. The water is accessible all the way round and has launching area on one side. The club house is a brick building with a meeting room, toilet, storage area and a building/repair area. Sailing/meetings are on: Wednesdays 9.00am -16.00 Sunday 8.00am - mid day. Membership fee is £50 Per year adult and £5 for a junior. This includes Third party public liability insurance very important and often overlooked. Location The Waterpark, Middleton St George, Darlington, Co. Durham DL2 1JG

WTF by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Thinking the former lol

Devil in the detail! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
I'm with you there Skydive 👍What Boatshed means is the part of the rudder in front of the stock. Thinks: are you building an Offshore Power Boat or a scale Lifeboat? If the former then follow Boatshed's recommendation. If the latter and the rudder is 'scale' then leave it alone. Any braking effect, which usually is only significant in a fast racing boat model or other fast planing types, can be diminished by reducing the rudder servo throw at the TX. One should also consider how the original behaved, maybe they did 'dig in' maybe not. There has to be a reason why such rudders were developed, and surely not just to annoy modellers 😁 One more minor point that struck me - Ouch 😭 Your prop struts! "not that it provides a huge amount of support but adds to the scale appearance." Even in a model they can be important. To help reduce potential whipping of the propshaft, especially if the model is overpowered. Actually in the originals they were vital, especially in larger vessels. The purpose of these struts, in larger vessels 'A' frames, is to provide support to the end of the shaft which carries the prop weighing several tons and, more important, to carry the bearing for the outer end of the shaft! Actually in the originals the shaft tube, or 'Stuffing Box' would not extend significantly beyond the hull. Thus the strut or A frame was vital for the shaft end bearing, fitted immediately in front of the prop for maximum stability. Attached pics of my HMS Belfast (sorry don't 'ave nutt'n smaller with this feature🤔) show the arrangement. Have witnessed such construction in various shipyards around the world. Last one in UK was the first T45, quite an experience! 😲 In the end she's your boat, if it feels good do it! 😉 I would leave the rudder alone if it is 'as fitted'. 👍 I make my struts and A frames from brass sheet and tube. Cheers Doug 😎 PS Stick with the brass Donnie! 👍

Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build by Smiffy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Andy I am interested to read about your plans for a dog boat as I am thinking of doing the same (when my Thames steam launch is eventually finished....!). One reason that I am considering this is that my headmaster, when I was at Maidenhead Grammar School in the 1960's, was a former skipper of MGB 658 and I am lucky enough have autographed copies of two of his books. "Motor Gunboat 658" is a fascinating read if you haven't already come across it, as is "Dog Boats at War" with plenty of useful information and photographs - just two of the books by Len Reynolds DSC. (He rose from Navigating Officer to Captain during the war in the Mediterranean theatre and served on MGB 658 from its commissioning in 1943 to the war's end.) Apologies by the way if you already know all this! Two questions if you don't mind - are you going to do a complete scratchbuild from plans or complete a fibreglass hull, and which/whose plans are you using? This may help my own decisions later on. I have seen that there are plenty of the appropriate weapons in 1/24th scale on the Deans website which should make life easier with the fiddly bits! Very best wishes with the build. Smiffy

The Smoke Stack by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Mornin' Ed! Glad it helped 👍 Dumas was more 'respectable' than I was when I first built my HMS Hotspur destroyer. I used squashed 'bog roll' tubes for the funnels😲 I guess that's probably 'hygiene paper' and 'smoke stacks' to you guys over there. In my defence: I was 15 and used whatever was in my 'line of sight' 😉 30 odd years later I replaced them with 1/32" balsa wrapped around several 1/4" formers, and lots of wood sealer! We live and learn 😉 BTW: 2nd coat of lacquer on the Sea Scout deck, see pic, some might be happy with this surface finish but after the success with the cabin roof I want to push my limits!! Could be a long night 😁 Will post details of the technique in my Sea Scout blog, main ingredient is PATIENCE! Cheers Doug 😎 PS: just opened a bottle of French 'elbow grease'; Rosé de Loire!!!