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>> Home > Tags > frames

frames
frames
Aerokits P.T Boat by canabus Lieutenant   Posted: 8 days ago
Hi boaty I maybe able to get the original plans, but, you would have to workout the frames as with Aerokits they did not include these. I do have the Sea Hornet and Swordsman plans with frames!! Canabus

Ship's Boats by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 15 days ago
Building a model ship often means building several models because most ships have boats. Constellation had six. My method for building boats is nearly the same for building larger hulls and real boats - planks over forms. I have a 1:12th scale drawing of Constellation's boat's in particular from the National Archives. They not only printed me a copy, but gave me a .tif image which I easily re-scaled to 1:36. I reproduced the lines as forms extended to a baseline so the boat could be built upside down. I drew each boat's patterns and arraged each to fit on a sheet of copy paper. I print this on a full sheet label so I can rough cut them, stick them on the form material, and then cut the forms. I had a few sheets of 1/8" balsa sheet and that's what I cut the forms from. A pine plank was used for the building-board, and marked where each station would go, then the forms were glued on making sure each was 90° to the form and square to the center-line. A note on the build-board, it doesn't have to be as wide as the boat, and should, in fact, be narrower. Then you can access inside the sheer and planking and removing the boat from the forms will be much easier. A small plank of 3/4" stock will let you get rubber bands completely around the model, and it will also fit in a vice which is very convenient. The edges of the forms are shaped so the planks will lie flat on the surface, and not teeter on the corners. Using balsa makes this easy work, though you have to be careful not to snap them off the build board. I started with the ship's 1st cutter, which is a lap-strake, or clinker-built boat. (Only the launch is carvel planked) It's frames are 1/16" thick bass strips 3/32" wide. Each frame is dipped in ammonia and bent over it's form. I put a dab of glue at the ends that would eventually be cut off to hold it to the form, but for the frames on the wine-glass and hollow forms at the ends I used rubber bands to pull them into shape. Part of the reasoning behind using balsa for the forms is if anything gets glued that shouldn't, it's the form and not the model that will give-way first. The stem, stern-post, and keel are 1/16" bass, assembled together while flat. First the top corners of the keel were planed off to make a sort of rabbet. The transom is also bass as it stays in the boat. The transom is cut taller to reach the build-board, and partially cut at what will be it's top to make it easier when it's time to detach the boat. It's glued to the stern post and the build-board, the keel is glued to each frame, and the stem is glued to the build-board. This pretty much forms the rigid skeleton of the boat. There's two ways to represent lapstrake planking on so small a model. One way is to sand each plank so it's half as thick at it's top edge as its bottom. The planks are butted on the boat, thick against thin, giving the impression of overlapped planks. I chose to actually overlap the planks because the inside of the boat is open to view. Since each plank of a lapstrake boat overlaps the one below it, each plank has to be spieled, or shaped to fit, and the boat must be planked from the keel to the sheer. I divide the length of the widest frame from the keel to the sheer into the number of planks I want, then divide the lengths of the stem and the stern by this number. You'll find the planks will get narrow forward, and flare wider back aft. You may have to experiment a bit with the number of planks so maintain at least 2 scale inches forward and not more than 5 scale inches aft, or the planking will look nonsensical and out-of-scale. I planked the cutter in 1/32" thick bass. The first planks are the garboards, next to the keel. The next plank I places a strip of card along side and used a piece of plank against the edge of the wood plank to mark the card. The marks are actually the bottom edge of the plank. Each plank is shaped on it's bottom edge to the plank before, and it's top edge is straight. Then I dip it in ammonia and clamp it in place, where "clamps" are rubber bands, blocks of wood, pins, clothes pins, whatever works. Again, a narrow build-board allows the rubber bands to pull in as you reach the sheer rather than pulling them away from the boat. Once your brain gets wrapped around spieling, the planking will move along. But don't try to do too much too fast or you'll just get frustrated and ruin everything. Take lots of breaks. The planks need to be sanded thinner at their ends, almost to nothing, depending how much of a rabbit was cut into the stem. At the stern they run right off the transom and are cut flush. You can notch the transom into step for each plank to fit into, of fill the little gaps where they overlap with putty later. Since they're getting painted, I used putty. When the planking is done up to the sheer, it's best to add rub rails and strakes while the boat's still on the forms. I then finished the cut in the transom, cut off the stem near the build-board, and nipped off each frame where it was glued to the form. Then carefully lift the boat off the forms. Some form may have come off with it, and some spots may need to be reglued. I installed frames between each of the ones the boat was built on, putting a frame about every scale foot. Seat clamps, floor boards, seats, oar notches, lifting eyes, mast steps, etc, are all added bit-by-bit. before you know it, you've got another model boat. I'll get into the launch next.

Talacre plans by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
Hi Doug I did acquire this as a part built model and followed the plan. My scale ship model club quickly advised me the plan was wrong! Should be easy enough to alter, the main problem is I have the lights installed and they use the outer frames to make the connections. Sails well on a calm day so I will probably defer until the winter. Caldercraft kits do make into nice models Dave

Progress Mark 2 by Pav403 Commander   Posted: 29 days ago
Hello all, So I've managed to get back to somewhere near where I was last time. The frame work is of a slightly thicker Ply (1/4") The Keel is straight, frames are all 100% level and I've now used balsa block for the Bow and Stern to give the planking a bit more support and to assist in getting a better shape at both ends. Fingers crossed I will have the hull build in the next few weeks, I can then get on with Sanding and filling before applying fiberglass and Resin to make the hull solid. Uploaded a few photos to show where I'm at. Good luck with your builds. Dave.

Constellation by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
This model was started in February of 1999, and has been worked on, at best, in fits and starts. While progress has been made, and it's capable of sailing, it's far from finished. It began as plywood paneling pulled from the walls of my first house and cut into frames. It was to be planked with white pine strips, also scraps from remodeling, but I was distracted by a book. Nasty things books, put all sorts of ideas in your head. I got the idea of making a plug for a mold so I could turn out THREE hulls! One for me, one for sale, and one to be donated to the real ship. To that end, and with the inspiration of the book, instead of planking, I battened the hull and sheathed it with brown paper wet-n-stick packing tape. Let's just say, that wasn't a good idea and leave it at that. A lot of life changes happened; moved to a farm; got unmarried, sold the farm, got an apartment, got a house with a workshop, and 10 years later, recommenced work on the model. I continued on with the original plan for about a day when I shifted gears and decided to glass the "plug" and make it a hull. I proceeded to prep it to that end, but looking back, what I should have done was strip it down the the forms and start again, planking it properly. Instead, I covered the outside with 4oz cloth, filled between the battens with poly resin and glass matting. The images show the model from it's start to it's glassing, though the site won't allow me to dictate the order in which they're presented - sorry for that. The model is of the American sloop of war Constellation launched in 1855, and as she appeared in Naples in 1856 based on a painting of her by Thomas deSimone. She is 1:36 scale; 1 inch = 3 feet. Beam: 13-5/8" (34.6 cm) Length on deck: 61" (154.9 cm) Length between perpendiculars (American): 59-1/8" (150.2 cm) Draft, without ballast keel: 7" (17.8 cm) With 3-1/2" ballast keel: 10-1/2" (26.7 cm) Weight, with ballast: Approx. 100 pounds (45.36 kg) Length over the rig: 95" (241.3 cm) Width over the rig: 30.5" (77.5 cm) ~ Main yard w/o stuns'l booms. Height bottom of keel to main truck, without ballast keel: 65" (165.1 cm) With ballast keel: 69" (175.3 cm) Total Sail Area: 2,807.01 square inches in 17 sails (19.5 sf, 18,110 scm, 1.8 sqm) Working Sail Area: 1,836.1square inches in 13 sails (12.75 sf, 11,845 scm, 1.2 sqm)

Gentlemans Cruiser by muddy Captain   Posted: 1 month ago
Started on the upper-works/cabin. Ring saw came into its own again. Followed up by the small mini drill, similar to a Dremil but with a bigger chuck which is handy, using Dremil 1/2" drum sander to clean up the window inner edges. Used 1.5mm ply for the cabin sides as they are going to be veneered, found a pice of veneer under the bench it nearly had roots, and i think, think, it's Teak. This was all glued up under weight using a PVA glue, probably the one in the pics, but an Alphatic. then when glue well and truly dry, Using a No10 scalpel blade to remove the innards of the window frames, and a quick swish with some fine grade sandpaper, not sure about any window frames as yet. ( to many windows for me ... ! ) Regards Muddy....

Shelduck by muddy Captain   Posted: 2 months ago
This Motor/Sailor was started in 2014 after a pal went on holiday to the New Forest, and arrived on the day when the Setley Pond MBC were there.. He Photographed two of these models, and when they were viewed, I was hooked. Plans and a CD were organised from the club/members, What a great set of Guys at Setley Pond Club. Scratch build was the order of the day . She was built with whatever materials i had here, mainly 5mm ply and Obechie strip, 3mm x 5mm.. The keel is laminated , three pices of 5mm and the bulkheads are 5mm. Some bulkheads had patterns made but most was traced then pin pricked onto the ply. A lot of dry fit's took place before the bulkheads were hollowed out , egg-box fashion framing was fitted to the top of the frames again in 5mm ply with some strip Obechie 10mm x 20mm forming the hatch openings. The prop shaft was slotted and built in as the keel was laminated. Regards Muddy....

The window glazing & frames. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
??....not sure I understand you comment but thanks anyway 👍

The window glazing & frames. by Inkoust Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Luxurious work, I have not seen a man so muddy for a long time. Hats off. Zdeněk

The window glazing & frames. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Boatshed. I have been using a product called 'Procan', I don't recall offhand where I bought it but it's clearly a very similar to the Deluxe product, please excuse the pun 😜

The window glazing & frames. by BOATSHED Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
What glue are you using for the windows ?? I haven't used a up to now but I purchased this for gluing in windows. deluxe materials glue & glaze

The window glazing & frames. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
A full set of laser cut perspex windows is supplied in the VMW kit along with corresponding frames for all and they are all a pretty good fit in the window apertures of the engine room, forward cabin and wheel house rear walls, only requiring a light easing with a file for a secure fit. I left the protective film on the screens whilst gluing them in place with a very small amount of canopy glue applied to the window edges with a dressmaking pin and pressed into place so that they were flush with the outside of the cabin walls. The wheelhouse windows were a bit trickier as they are glued to the inside face of the panels and I had to remove the protective film around the edges of the outer face of the windows by running a fine sharp blade around the window aperture with the perspex held in place by hand. Canopy glue was then used very sparingly on the face of the perspex and the windows clamped in place. The central screen of the wheelhouse has the Kent Clearview in it and this needed to be carefully centred before fixing in place. When all had dried and set the protective films were peeled off to reveal nice clear ‘panes’ without any unsightly glue smudges. The CNC cut window frames are made from a flexible plastic material with accurate and well defined edges. They were all given a light sanding with abrasive paper as a key for the paint and were then laid out on a large piece of card paying particular attention to getting them the correct side up, in particular the wheelhouse frames which are ‘handed’ for either port or starboard. They were all held to the board with small pads of double sided foam tape and sprayed with two coats of Halfords metallic silver paint followed by two light coats of Halfords gloss lacquer. After a couple of days to dry they were removed from the board and fixed in place with canopy glue applied with a pin as very small dots around the inside face, aligned with masking tape ‘guides’ and a straight edge and then held in place with small tabs of masking tape. The installation of the glazing in the wheelhouse was made a lot easier because I had previously cut away some of the bulkhead and rear wall to give better access to the wheelhouse interior for detailing. This is not mentioned in the building instructions but is well worth doing for all the above reasons 😁

Speranza 01 by muddy Captain   Posted: 2 months ago
This is one that i,ve yearned after for some considerable years. Had the plans in the 1960's, I think, but it was always put on the back burner. But needs must, we have a big sailing lake now and a Sea Queen looks ideal on this water. Speranza, built from Plans, first thing source the timber, 5mm ply for keel and bulkheads,and Obechie 6mm X 3mm laminated for stringers and chine lines. Transferring bulkheads/frames to the timber can be daunting, but several methods can be applied. Personally i prefer to Trace the outline and detail then pin prick the outlines onto the timber, you can do this direct from the plan, but using tracing paper or drafting film saves the drawing from disintegrating. Have used carbon paper in the past, but I did find this a bit messy, a personal choice.

Er slight Problem by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Dave I don't think I am that but we did a build blog and the pics are from that. Yes you do need to support the frames and keel and plank equally on each side and wait until the glue has dried before removing. No stringers needed as 1/4 ply frames screwed to the baseboard. Once planked the inside was fibreglassed and the outside covered in glass cloth so the structure was very light and robust for a 9' model. Hope you manage to get your hull made on the next attempt. Dave

Er slight Problem by Pav403 Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Hello Dave, Thank you for the advice, have you written a book as you are the oracle :) I was using 4mm balsa for the walls but I think when applying I've not had the frames back in a solid / secure support? Lesson learnt now, the frame is staying in their secure mounts until I am satisfied it's not warping. One thing I did notice with you models of Titanic and Olympic was the lack of stringers, I take it the frames were thick enough and the Balsa thin you did not need any lateral support? Again thank you for your advice on this one. Regards Dave