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>> Home > Tags > fuse

fuse
fuse
Proximity (Hall effect) sensor wiring by Escrich Apprentice   Posted: 5 days ago
Of you want to use a magnet, of course forget the Hall effect semiconductor, best, as appointed, is to use reed relays, looks a good idea to use a screw and a motor to remove the main fuse, place a second reed to make the motor put on place the fuse again

Proximity (Hall effect) sensor wiring by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Hi Haverlock, Quite correct. Nobody said it did! We took it as read that for operation main power drive would be connected and disconnected at the end of the run. Preferably by removing a fuse in the positive lead. Batteries should not be left connected in models anyway.😉 Cheers, Doug 😎

My other hobby by Hellmut1956 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 18 days ago
Hi. Mi private pilots license also does not include night flying. But interesting is to consider when they define what is included. When having a certain number of instructed night flights you are entitled to fly in the vicinity of an airport. Vicinity of an airport German definition is that you have to be able to see the traffic in the pattern of an airport. When I did my flight from San Jose, CA to Phoenix SkyHarbour, I was able to see the traffic being about 1.5 hours from the airport. The night definition is that the night begins 30 minutes after sunset. So was entitled to do this night approaches as you can see the traffic in the pattern, on a large airport like Sky Harbour, and in the Southwest of the USA from very far. But when doing these landing operations at a large international airport, shortly before touch-down you are flying into a black hole. Due to this on my first landing in Sky Harbour, I made an awful 3-point-landing making the plane jump 2 or 3 times. Fortunately, I was aware of how to react properly when this happens. The second special experience is when you are taxiing on the runway to get to its exit and report "runway vacated" in a small plane like a Cessna Cutlass the lights lose their structure. So I went to search for the yellow line on the left side of the runway until it curved into the exit. But this yellow line and the blue runway lights are hugely distant from each other so I had to focus my efforts to stay to the right of the blue lights but still being able to see the yellow line. Once I crossed the lines that mark that you are leaving the runway I could report back to the tower "runway vacated". My second-night landing was when I did try to fly to an airport next to the "Grand Canyon". As the report of the airport said expect gain or lose 40 knots of speed on final I decided not to land and flew back To Phoenix. What a wonderful experience. The landscape was already impressive on my flight to the Grand Canyon, but it was topped when I flew by night. First I was in contact with one center in charge while being above a certain altitude. Then this center passes you to one in charge below that altitude. Makes you feel like a professional pilot. Finally, this center did pass me to the tower of Sky Harbor. I was approaching from the north. Then, what controllers of large airports like they make you cross the airport midfield what ensures you stay away from the other traffic of the airport. You cannot imagine what a sight it is when you approach a large city like Phoenix by night. After he gave me its clear to land I was remembering my awful night landing earlier. When I did have the feeling that I was about to touch-down I did control the airplane so that all you felt on touch-down was the vibration of the wheels turning. A Geman friend of mine that was on the plane with me was so impressed that he said he would fly again with me at any time. One other fact I want to share is the importance to really dominate the phraseology of radio communication and what Americans call to know the system. On my first approach by night to Phoenix, I did confuse the last VOR with the ILS beacon. So when switching to what I thought to be the last VOR the needle got full to the right and stayed there. So I did a report I was not able to tune in the VOR and so tower did give me instructions for the further approach. When you fly in from the west you fly over a mountain full of antennas and the red lights on top of it. I felt very good being routed by the tower. Those of you familiar with night-flight and how to find the location of the airport know the rule of the black spot within the lights of the city is where the airport is. Well, Sky Harbor has the terminal building between its 2 runways and so Sky Harbor does not look like a black spot. So when the tower asked me if I had field in sight I did respond negative a couple of times until he reported that I was on the 45 for the runway. Then I finally saw the airport. Here is something that is the consequence of good radio training. My instructor always said to report negative until you are really enabled to say affirm. So Tower knows when you are really able to report affirm. Do not be shy, it is your and others life! The second time on that approach was when tower gave me the instruction: 3-60 to the right until further advice! My teacher played the role of the tower and one of the things he said to teach us the right behavior was to stay silent and fly as instructed until tower contacts you again. I do confess I had never done 3-60s neither by night nor during the day! So I put the plane into a standard curve, kept it there, watched my altitude and speed. Being so familiar with this instruction from the tower I felt "at home" and this being relaxed was very useful!

My other hobby by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 18 days ago
Just recalled one of my weirder experiences on a commercial flight! Was also on the memorable trip to Uganda end of the 80ies, just after Idi Amin had left the stage! Was on a hop from Nairobi to Kampala (Entebbe). Aircraft was a venerable Boeing 727of Kenya Airways. Had a funny feeling climbing aboard as I saw the oil streaks over the wings and underside of the fuselage. The smell inside and state of the floor was more like a public toilet than a commercial aircraft.😡 After taking my window seat I was joined by a large 'native' Momma, who took up the remaining two seats in the row, and then I realised why the floor was as it was.😲 She plumped herself down with a big grin all round and carefully settled a large wooden crate with slats on her expansive lap! The crate was full of LIVE CHICKENS!!!!!!!!!!!! At first my ghast was absolutely flabbered😲 I expected that next someone would start building a fire to roast one, but it turned out to be quite funny and even useful! When the 'In flight meal' arrived it looked to me like old British Rail sandwiches (banana shaped) that they had sold on around 1960! I spent the rest of the flight feeding them to the chickens to the delight of 'Momma' and others around us, not to mention the chickens 😁 If you fly around long enough, and to off beat places, all sorts of odd things can happen! 😉 Priceless memories 😊 Cheers all, Doug 😎

My other hobby by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
It was Ed 👍 we took off from an ex Luftwaffe field just north of Munich, flew SSW down to the Alps then East along the Alps, roughly following the Austrian border, to Salzburg and then north back to Munich. Great views 😊 My daughter was just 5 years old and absolutely loved it, the (then) wife refused to go!! Probably just as well, nobody needs a 'back seat pilot' 😁

fuse holder by DodgyGeezer Lieutenant   Posted: 20 days ago
Depends how fast you want it to go! Electrical kit is either rated continuous or intermittent. Continuous ratings are usually conservative - you can exceed them somewhat - but they also assume decent cooling. The inside of a boat is usually sealed, and so is poor for cooling unless specific provision is made. Chinese ratings tend to be a bit unreliable - and watch out for cheap kit with phenomenal specs that are only achievable if you plunge them into liquid nitrogen! I typically run my 12v rated brushless motors at 7.2v. That way they just get a bit warm in a sealed boat and need no cooling. For brushed motors the brushes tend to be the weak spot if you put a lot of amps through them. Check your motors for heat after a run and you'll soon find out if you're mistreating them... If you're thinking about Taycols, the smaller ones were definitely brush-limited. Though the bigger ones are typically rated at 12v, the initial review for the Standard reckoned it could take 20v or more. Open frame motors are easier to cool. But I wouldn't like to guarantee the paxolin bearings if you did that...

fuse holder by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
Depends what type of motor you want to use. If using a can type dc motor only power to the recommended battery, usually shown on the motor casing. If going brushless, again they are rated to battery size, ie 2s, 3s, etc, but the motors are a lot more flexible as to battery output. Some can cover 3 or 4 battery sizes.

fuse holder by teejay Commander   Posted: 20 days ago
Hi all thank you all for advice and comments , I have had a good look at all the suggestion and decided to go for the 3m scotch suitcase type and I will let you know if they are ok. now I have a question for all when choosing motors should you chose a voltage rating equal to the of the battery or higher then the voltage of the battery

fuse holder by Ianh Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 20 days ago
Try the 3M scotch ones suitcase type in line and take blade fuses I use RS components here in SA.

fuse holder by DodgyGeezer Lieutenant   Posted: 21 days ago
Well, perhaps I exaggerate a bit! I haven't got an example of the twin-output Comet that was mentioned in the 1956 line-up (and which i suspect was a short-lived prototype). But I do have a Marine, which is similarly rare...

fuse holder by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Wow! How did you manage that?😲 Must be worth a small fortune if they're in decent nick😉 I'm turning into a green hulk! Cheers, Doug 😎

fuse holder by DodgyGeezer Lieutenant   Posted: 22 days ago
All of them.

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Mornin' JB, Guess I'll have to remain 'agnostic' on this issue for now - I'm still to be convinced. This might explain a phenomenon I've noticed during testing of the Taycol Supermarine I've just renovated for Colin. More on that later in the 'Supermarine resurrection' blog. I'll do some experiments using my digital scope and see if I can trap and measure these elusive spikes for various wire lengths😉 Can't comment on the guy from Castle, don't know them, except to say that I found his comments a bit vague and without explanation. There are also contradictory posts on that link; some say before the ESC some after. Can't really see the point of putting the caps in front of the ESC, switching spikes SHOULD only appear on the output side I'll look at that on the scope, and after all a fuse to protect against fouled prop and jammed motor is standard fit between battery and ESC, or should be! So some wiring extension for that is essential. Also I would expect the battery to flatten any spikes that do appear at the ESC supply side. As you say the internals of several 'manufacturers' ESCs are often the same. Nothing new, branding and badge engineering has been going on for decades for all sorts of things and no RC kit manufacturer / distributor produces his own components. Important factors are; quality of his own assembly and where does he buy his components - originals or cheap copies? 28 ESCs! Wow 😲 and I thought I had a lot! As reported I have so far had good results with the Quicrun series, both brushed and brushless. Next one to test is their Dual Brushed version. Prior to going brushless I used a lot of Graupner ESCs - made in Korea., never managed to blow one of them either, not even the little micro and pico jobs. Thanks for raising this issue - I like a good debate and we can all learn something from it I hope👍 Plus; piquing my curiosity is always dangerous 😁 Greetings to Down Under from 'Up Over', cheers, 😎Doug PS Further thought just struck me (Ouch😡); if this is really a dramatic problem why have I never seen any warnings about it in any ESC instructions? Yes, I'm THAT guy who actually reads the instructions!!

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 22 days ago
Doug, you are probably correct and good thought regarding the polarised caps , but I was just thinking that if the battery input was going through a fuse system as it appears in Rowens photos (difficult to see) it may have caused a slight problem. I have seen mentions of up to 12" between batt and ESC being no problem at lower Amps. You might notice that one of the inputs was from a guy from Castle Creations (USA) which I thought would give a bit of weight to the information. I have always gone with the ESC manufacturers suggestions regarding wire length and have never had a problem in boats or planes (mainly in planes,-18 most 'converted' to electric from IC -3 capable of pulling 1200W) It's great to be able to chuck ideas and info around, as we can all pick something out of it all which will solve a problem, or perhaps stop us from toasting an electronic component or whatever. BTW, I saw somewhere that extending the wires could cause stuttering and that was one other reason for mentioning the info, as I know Rowen's had a problem with that. I'm sure it will be ok as is,- if its working fine, and it's not going to be run flat out every day it will probably last for years. Probably me thinking on the cautious side as my personal approach to building is to use the K.I.S.S method (may not be the flashest but usually keeps me out of trouble) Regarding the quality of ESCs, you will find that many have the same internal bits just with different cases and colours, (same with chargers) HK is bad for this. Many I have seen use an Atmega chip and you can tell differences by the programming method (some you have to do 1 step and disconnect power before the next step, others just with stick forward center back center etc. Most boards are made in China (Castle Creations and a few others being exceptions) and what you get depends on the quality of assembly/soldering etc in the plant they are made in (if you want to see how many of these items are made in China check out Made In China.com and search ESCs for example. I have cheap ESCs I've used in my planes for years with no probs which look like the HK Red Brick ESCs (except blue) and they are better than the TGY branded ones at 3x the price, and really let the power through !. Even CC have apparently made boards for HK with different cases as have Hobbywing. It's really a case of "you pays ya money and ya takes ya chances". In saying that you are pretty safe with Hobbywing, Tamya, SkyRc, or Castle Creations (USA) but there are other better non China ones around but a a much bigger price. Hope we aren't overloading you Rowen, you might have to get into the 'anti-freeze' to soothe the brain in that cold weather. Another site for you to check out which I have found to be very good, with prices to match HK is RCEcho.com (Hong Kong) Have bought most of my aircraft ESCs from them (around 28 from 30A-120A with no probs)

fuse holder by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 23 days ago
OK Roger Wilco Dodgy, Which Taycol(s) do you have? 😎