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>> Home > Tags > glass fibre

glass fibre
fibre glass
fibreglass
fiber glass
fiberglass
glass
trent class
glass fibre
Hull off the build jig by steve-d Lieutenant   Posted: 13 days ago
I didn't know I was building a canoe for a small child but that's how it's come out. Now needs strong points for the keel mount, a step for the mast and reinforcement for chain plates etc. I will then glass fibre the inside before making some deck beams.

Spraying Again....... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Agreed Boaty 👍 With a plastic or glass fibre hull it's a slightly different kettle of fish. However I'm still wary of the primer absorbing moisture.🤔 Sealing with a matt or silk lacquer seems to give an extra knot or so as well😉 But here we were discussing wooden hulls. Cheers, Doug 😎

St Canute Planking Help? by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Richard, Unless you are planning to finish the hull with varnish, to show off the wood, the easiest way is to fit hard balsa or obechi blocks and cut, file and sand to fit. This is the 'way out' I chose on the renovation of my Billing fish cutter. See pics. Pic 1. The mess I started with, Pic 2. Block fitted and shaped, new keel fitted, whole hull then covered inside and out with glass fibre tissue and EzeKote, Pic 3. Preliminary priming prior to final filling (minimal) and sanding, Pic 4. Nearly there 😉 Otherwise you are faced with some tedious steaming, bending and pinning😲 Hope this helps some. Good luck, keep us up to date with progress please👍, Cheers, Doug 😎

Clyde Puffer by lesliebreame Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Correction on details of Hydro. Gordon tells me the boat is Japanese from the 1980's made by Gunze Sangyo . It has the original Mabuchi motor and mechanical speed wiper controller [gets very hot ! ] . The hull is fine glass fibre not plastic.

Now Coating and Matting by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
On to Coating and Matting. (as well as sanding!) Now have at least finished all the stripping. Then did the ‘bright light in the hull bit’ to look for areas that needed patching. The major problem area was in the bow and that did not receive the light as it is a totally blanked off compartment. However, it was obvious from the outside anyway so, could I assume it was the only leak? Decided to put a fine matt over the whole hull, not deck, just to be sure of best chance of success. I can imagine what will be said here if it still leaks after all this! I had ordered some supplies ready for the next stage and drew up a plan view of the boat to help think through layout of electrics and other items. Made my usual mistakes about size. Some fittings purchased too small………However, never too large now that’s interesting. Some materials purchased too large. Now have a life’s worth of Resin……(when does it ‘go off’ by?) Also have a lounge floors worth of tissue matting! Also Sandpaper. Now there is a mine field. So now I know a bit more about that and which way the numbers work! When I forgot to put the mask on, I had some of the crispest 'bogies' in years.............. No images posted! On the plus side, although I never wanted to get into this stripping sanding, filling sanding, sealing sanding, matting sanding, painting sanding, painting, sanding bit……………. I now feel I started out with someone’s boat I had bought and now it has become “my boat” for real! I am at the stage now where I have put some filler in and applied the first coat of Eze-Kote from DeLuxe Materials To use Eze-kote read stuff from RNinMunich on this blog or the’ leaking boat’ thread. Washes out of the brushes very easily. There is such as this ..... Youtube link - watch?v=yP05qv3QtUk RNinMunich or Colin H. and the like have bits of extra comment and experience that is always very helpful. BTW, after that finer sanding before first coat, I did the dust down and vacuuming bit but it still felt a bit ‘chalky’ so I gave it a wipe with Methylated Spirits. Now I realise that has water in it, so if anything goes wrong it could be blamed on that................. Having left the first coat to dry I started to cut out the light matt to apply after the next sanding. The matting I have is called Glassfibre Surface Tissue EGlass from FibreGlass Direct. A part of Tricel Composites (NI) Limited. Available internationally in lengths from a metre upwards, it is quite fine in weave so we shall see what happens. I have left quite a wide margin at the moment but may reduce that when I have tried using it! This is another first for me so plenty of room for mistakes............... Will need to cover with the matt in stages as I cannot get around all the boat without changing its position. Going for the bottom of the vessel and stern board first as I figure they are going to be easier than some of the other bits. Then will leave that to cure before moving the boat. Really worried about the joins/overlaps and how well I will cope with those, not to mention the curved bit! Started to look at electrics and layout for a bit of a change. I will post again when I have had the first battles with the matting! TTFN. NPJ

Taymar by Brianaro Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 months ago
[Score: 10/10] 39" Taymar Twin Propellors Direct Drive to a Graupner 600 x2 - Comments: Recently purchased Model Slipway Taymar Lifeboat and just started working on the glassfibre hull

Seaplane Tender 360 by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi Bryan, If you want to do the SOE version she was most likely painted all matt black! The colour of skulduggery 😉 What ever you do, despite your good intentions to retain the 'old patina', judging by the photos you are in for a complete strip back and redo. Just as I have discovered with the PTB I bought. Thought it would just be a 'cosmetic job', flatten back and respray with Pacific green camouflage. Ho ho ho! Pics show what she currently looks like after cleaning off layers of enamel, and discovering that the prop shafts and rudders were misaligned and the chine strakes glued to the paint. 😡 Never mind an engine room fire when I tried to test the 'as bought' motor installation. 😭 Since those photos I have fitted new a new chine strake and started reinforcing the thin hull with glass fibre tissue. Next issue; set prop tubes properly and make an alu bracket to mount both the motors. Then set the rudder stocks correctly. Last thing I want is to dampen your enthusiasm, but that hull looks like it needs oodles of TLC. 🤔 Be aware of what's ahead of you and plan accordingly👍 Deck looks pretty neat, if unusual for a WW2 in service boat! As far as I can tell from the photos it's not just the cabin roof which is warped 😲 cabin and window frames will also need some attention by the looks of it. Before you run that motor I would strip it, clean all parts and check brushes and commutator for wear. See my Sea Scout blog 'Taycol Target motor' for a 'How to'. Should run well with a 3S LiPo, 11.1V. These boats weren't the fastest, 28 - 30 knots I believe. Which is why ST360 was reduced to more mundane duties after try outs by SOE. Don't forget some spark suppression!! Good luck, whatever you decide to do have fun doing it, Cheers Doug 😎

Fibreglass the hull- continued by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Now the Chine rubbing strakes are fitted, dry and filled and I have attended to the minor lumps and bumps the next job is to give another coat of resin, taking the issues of the first application into account I intend to apply a thin coat, this has the effect of filling in the pattern of the glass cloth. Another two days have passed and it’s time to do some rubbing down. I have found that the surface is very hard, more so than I recall some of the other fibre glass projects I have done but these have been using Polyester resin. It’s a first for epoxy, so is epoxy a better choice than Polyester? According to my mini research –  Epoxy is more versatile  Epoxy has fewer fumes  Epoxy is stronger  Epoxy shrinks less Conclusion Epoxy is the better choice for repairing/covering either wooden hulls or repairing fiberglass boats. It has excellent adhesive qualities, wets out fiberglass fabrics and it is tough. It has great thin film cure characteristics, cures in cool temperatures. After the first coat I wasn’t 100 % happy with the finish but I just thought that some dust had landed on the surface before the resin had dried, (this was proved not to be dust but because of the matting pattern still been visible it disguised the real problem) however this was easily sanded out with wet & dry. Now the hull and deck were looking really smooth with very little sign of the matting pattern it was time to give a final coat. I had decided to coat both the deck and the hull in one go so I mixed enough resin to do the lot. Starting with the deck I started to apply the resin but to may horror it started to pin prick all over the deck surface, panic, panic what was causing this? So was it the brush which I had previously washed out with cellulose thinners after applying the last batch of resin. I decided to remove the resin and use a new brush (I had 90 mins cure time to do this) so cleaning of with paper towel and finally with a wipe with thinners I started to apply resin again – but it happened again as I sat in despair I looked into the pot of resin wondering where to go next when I saw a film on the top of the remaining resin It was then I noticed a ridge in the cups side. It was the wax coating that had melted into the resin and subsequently appeared as pin pricks in the newly applied surface. At this realisation I removed all the resin again and took a breather hoping I had found the problem. Another day and a light rub down of the deck to make sure the surface is ready to receive its final coat. Resin weighed (in a glass container this time) and well mixed I started to apply again and fortunately it was OK and all surfaces were coated.

Fibreglass the hull by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
I purchased as recommended by Robbob the fibreglass package which consisted of 750g of epoxy resin and 250g of hardener, I also went for the 90min cure as this is the first time I have ever done a boat hull, I’ve done plenty of stranded fibre cowlings/air intakes etc. where you lay a gel coat first then stranded matting which is so different to laying a fine matt on its own. I also ordered some mixing sticks and throw away brushes. First I cut the matting to the slightly oversize for one of the side skins, then loosely taped the matt to the bottom skin and checked the coverage - and checked again then fold over to the opposite side, this then leaves the surface clear to apply the resin. Mixing the resin should be done accurately, so borrow the kitchen scales and here we go. I wasn’t sure how much to mix for a side skin but 25g of resin and 7.5g of hardener looks about right. So mix well and then brush onto the side skin, then I gently lifted over the matting and laid it on the skin and gently brushed the matting down, the matting is almost sucked onto the resin so minimal brushing is required to ensure a smooth surface A previous blog said that “Less is More” how true this is, the temptation to spread the remainder of the resin on to the already adhered matt is something to be avoided, however learn by my mistake as I did just that (only in a small area on one skin) leaving rather a lot of sanding later after the resin had fully cured as it leaves a rather lumpy surface. So onward and upwards the following three surfaces were relatively easy with only minor difficulty keeping the matting in close to the 90 degree angle between the keel and skin and I had to keep going back to it pressing it in with a steel rule until the resin started to go off but minimal resin left a surface that was flat and the weave of the glass matt can be clearly seen and felt but minimal sanding is required if at all. Then a further 2 coats of resin with sanding in between will leave a smooth surface ready for final preparation of painting. The final picture is of the roof that in a previous page I said to add strength the roof would need a coat of glass to reinforce the unsupported edges – To be continued

Clyde puffer by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Eveni' Marky, Re Tights! What's handy will surely depend on the Missus or ..? 😉 Frankly I would dispense with the tights altogether (the Missus may of course have a different opinion😁), more trouble than they are worth and don't contribute much or anything to the construction if the basis was soundly built. It only costs you more resin to fill in the mesh of the tights. If you must use tights then the higher the denier the better (at least 40 - 50) anything less will have a very open mesh and contribute virtually nothing to the hull strength, the Missus will explain denier to you This seems to me to be a 'hangover' from 50s style construction when glass fibre was more expensive relatively speaking. I tried it back then with a scratch built Sopwith Camel fuselage and it was a total disaster. Instead planking with 1/32 balsa and a thin resin coat worked a treat. Nowadays, 30 years or more, I use glass fibre tissue instead; density and therefore strength imparted to the hull is more even cos it don't stretch like tights! Whatever, have fun, and greetings to the Better Half (tights donator!) Cheers Doug 😎 PS: if you feel you need tights😲 (or FG tissue) fit the rubbing strakes after this, and after sanding the tights / tissue to shape. Otherwise the strakes will just get in the way and be a nuisance to sanding and will get damaged / deformed. PPS: shame about the amber nectar, my commiserations 🤔 My current tipple is more tawny port colour; a rather nice Lagavulin 😜

H.M.S BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
My only experience of a vacuum formed hull was a slightly smaller Tyne class lifeboat. Was satisfied with it, but glass fibre seems more robust, stiffer and stronger. Imagine a Vac formed hull will need full size stiffening bulkheads, which can be avoided with the GF version. Weight is very much a concern on this model and whilst Vac formed is probably lighter, this advantage may be offset by the additional structure.

H.M.S BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Thinking of a future project and decided upon another launch type vessel. My earlier Daman 4207 project gave an interesting model with good performance. The Brave class of FPBs (Fast Patrol Boats) caught my attention. Can remember the incredible performance they offered when entering service. Only two of the class were used by the RN, although variants were used by other navies. Have decided to use proprietary Glass fibre hulls in future as they probably cost little more than building from scratch using wood and resin. They give a robust and watertight hull, but one which still requires thought to complete properly. There are several companies that offer a “Perkasa” hull, a Brave class derivative with an almost identical hull. From previous experience have decided to limit my models to 40” long, larger vessels become difficult to transport and handle. After much research considered the hull offered by MTB Hulls in Gibraltar met my requirements best. The inquiry to MTBHulls was well handled; the quotation acceptable, so placed an order. Was pleasantly surprised at the shipping costs. From the UK these often approach the cost of the hull, but from Gibraltar they are much more reasonable. Delivery only took 7 days.

Hull identity???? by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
Evenin' Colin, a nice 'roly-poly' hull you've got there 👍 I could imagine it as an Admiral's Barge or Pinnace 😉 Re frame fixing etc. I'll send you some pics of typical Dean's instructions for preparing glass fibre and plastic hulls. My experience of the 6V Decaperm in my Sea Scout was that it was decidedly sedate so it might suit a barge or pinnace style!? Cheers, Doug 😎

Interceptor by CB90 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 24"/2000g Interceptor Capable of 15mph and a runtime of 10mins Single Propellor (2 Blade X Type 35mm) Direct Drive to a 2958 watercooled (2 Blade X Type) Powered by LiPoly (11.1v) 6Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Unknown 200A (100Amps) ESC - Comments: Zoom 1 (Interceptor) Mono boat. Built from a Glassfibre hull, brought on Ebay for £35 the hull is a slim mono racing type with a self-righting side cabin it runs a 1400W 14V 2958 4200KV Brushless Motor and 29-S Water Cooling Jacket with additional air cooling fan. I did not want to use a flexi drive as high maintenance and prone to failure so the shaft runs via two universal joint one at each end. the propeller is a 38mm copper alloy The ESC is a 200A and water cooled the twin rudders supply separate water one for the motor and one for the ESC. The rudder are positioned to reduce prop-walk and are hinged to prevent damage if hit a object in the water and ride adjustment. Turn fins and trim tabs for ride adjustment were provided by a spares kit for another boat. also foamed and added an inner sealed hatch, a rubber bump strip and safety loop. The Boat is fast and over-powered used at half throttle, may use a 7.4v lipo instead, the self righting works well. 20th April 2018 while running on 11.1v the boat stopped, no response on retrieval It was found that the manufacturers battery connector had melted and the connection lost see later pictures. the battery was made by FLOUREON and was a 35C with 5500mah capacity the 80A fuse had not blown.

Zoom 1 (Interceptor) by CB90 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
Zoom 1 (Interceptor) Mono boat. Built from a Glassfibre hull, brought on Ebay for £35 the hull is a slim mono racing type with a self-righting side cabin it runs a 1400W 14V 2958 4200KV Brushless Motor and 29-S Water Cooling Jacket with additional air cooling fan. I did not want to use a flexi drive as high maintenance and prone to failure so the shaft runs via two universal joint one at each end. the propeller is a 38mm copper alloy The ESC is a 200W and water cooled the twin rudders supply separate water one for the motor and one for the ESC. The rudder are positioned to reduce prop-walk and are hinged to prevent damage if you hit a object in the water and also for ride adjustment. Turn fins and trim tabs for ride adjustment were provided by a spares kit for another boat. also foamed and added an inner sealed hatch, a rubber bump strip and safety loop.