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>> Home > Tags > glass

glass
fiber glass
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glass
Progress Mark 2 by Pav403 Commander   Posted: 2 days ago
Hello all, So I've managed to get back to somewhere near where I was last time. The frame work is of a slightly thicker Ply (1/4") The Keel is straight, frames are all 100% level and I've now used balsa block for the Bow and Stern to give the planking a bit more support and to assist in getting a better shape at both ends. Fingers crossed I will have the hull build in the next few weeks, I can then get on with Sanding and filling before applying fiberglass and Resin to make the hull solid. Uploaded a few photos to show where I'm at. Good luck with your builds. Dave.

Fibre glassing by GrahamP74 Lieutenant   Posted: 2 days ago
Decided that this heat would make it an ideal day to pop on a mask and gloves and glass in some of the beams and beds! Added a coat to the gunnels and the transom too. Also fitted the rudder, used some plumbing pipe which I glassed in. Deck has also been started as well as the forward deck.

water, paint, copper by Jerry Todd Lieutenant   Posted: 3 days ago
The gun deck isn't modeled. I was building a model intended to sail in open water and didn't want to deal with open gun ports, hatches, etc. After glassing the hull, she got beams for the spar deck installed. 3/4" x 3/4", they're probably a bit more than was needed. Tubes were installed for 5/16" stainless threaded rods that would hold her external ballast on. The forward one will be disguised as her galley stovepipe, the aft one is hidden under the cabin skylight. The ballast is a 2" i.d. PVC pipe about 4 feet long, filled with lead bird-shot, and weighing some 42 pounds. With that much done, I took her to the creek to see her float, but I forgot the rods. A few days later I took her out again, remembering the rods, and put her lower masts in her. Now baptized, I applied the moldings and trim on her stern, and built up her enclosed head. Her gunport were molded in resin in the closed position with the guns clamped in the openings and a tampion in the muzzles. These were epoxied into gunports cut from the outer layer of glass and wood battens, leaving the matting in place as a backer. Then she got some paint, mainly because I was getting tired of her looking like a barkless log. The bottom was painted with copper paint, but three rolls of 1/2" wide peel-n-stick tape had just arrived and I started into coppering her bottom right off. Copper plates are nailed on with copper nails with counter-sunk heads through pre-punched holes in the copper sheets. The are FLAT with with a little hollow where they're driven in just beyond flush with the surface. They are NOT round headed nor look like rivets as so many models insist are doing. I pressed an impression of the nails into the face of each plate. Installing them pushes this dent back out and leaves a little circle that looks as it should. It took about a week to do one side, and I took a break to make the tops for the lower masts, then continued onto coppering the other side. It was bright and beautiful when finished, but it wouldn't stay that way. Copper doesn't turn green when submerged, any copper coin will show you it turns brown. I wanted her bottom to brown somewhat, but not too much, and I figured to let that happen naturally. When it got where I wanted it, I'd clear-coat it to lock it in. Two yards of Dupont Supplex cloth was ordered to make her sails. This is the stuff SC&H used on their square-rigger kits and it's great for making sails. Being a nylon, you cut it with a hot-knife, and use a pointed tip in a soldering iron to make grommets. I drew on the panel seams with a .03 marker as even the finest stitching is over scale even at 1:36. Top-cloths, corner reinforces, reef bands, etc, are all cut from the same cloth and glued on with fabric adhesive. The only sewing was of the bolt-ropes. These are done by hand much the way real ones are - I've sewn a few miles of real bolt ropes in my time. There's really no substitute for this if you want a functional scale appearing sail. A machine can't sew it properly, in the right position, or securely.

what fittings for a plane prop by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Hi Dave, Sonar seemed to have an easy problem to help with, props must be a balance to the motor output, thrust , RPM and amps drawn. not like in my day, brute horsepower and more nitro!!! we were also using Glass and carbon props at 30000 plus rpm, OOOH the noise

Constellation by Jerry Todd Lieutenant   Posted: 4 days ago
This model was started in February of 1999, and has been worked on, at best, in fits and starts. While progress has been made, and it's capable of sailing, it's far from finished. It began as plywood paneling pulled from the walls of my first house and cut into frames. It was to be planked with white pine strips, also scraps from remodeling, but I was distracted by a book. Nasty things books, put all sorts of ideas in your head. I got the idea of making a plug for a mold so I could turn out THREE hulls! One for me, one for sale, and one to be donated to the real ship. To that end, and with the inspiration of the book, instead of planking, I battened the hull and sheathed it with brown paper wet-n-stick packing tape. Let's just say, that wasn't a good idea and leave it at that. A lot of life changes happened; moved to a farm; got unmarried, sold the farm, got an apartment, got a house with a workshop, and 10 years later, recommenced work on the model. I continued on with the original plan for about a day when I shifted gears and decided to glass the "plug" and make it a hull. I proceeded to prep it to that end, but looking back, what I should have done was strip it down the the forms and start again, planking it properly. Instead, I covered the outside with 4oz cloth, filled between the battens with poly resin and glass matting. The images show the model from it's start to it's glassing, though the site won't allow me to dictate the order in which they're presented - sorry for that. The model is of the American sloop of war Constellation launched in 1855, and as she appeared in Naples in 1856 based on a painting of her by Thomas deSimone. She is 1:36 scale; 1 inch = 3 feet. Beam: 13-5/8" (34.6 cm) Length on deck: 61" (154.9 cm) Length between perpendiculars (American): 59-1/8" (150.2 cm) Draft, without ballast keel: 7" (17.8 cm) With 3-1/2" ballast keel: 10-1/2" (26.7 cm) Weight, with ballast: Approx. 100 pounds (45.36 kg) Length over the rig: 95" (241.3 cm) Width over the rig: 30.5" (77.5 cm) ~ Main yard w/o stuns'l booms. Height bottom of keel to main truck, without ballast keel: 65" (165.1 cm) With ballast keel: 69" (175.3 cm) Total Sail Area: 2,807.01 square inches in 17 sails (19.5 sf, 18,110 scm, 1.8 sqm) Working Sail Area: 1,836.1square inches in 13 sails (12.75 sf, 11,845 scm, 1.2 sqm)

Dumas Chris Craft finishing by don6398 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 4 days ago
I completed the Dumas 36" CHRISCraft several years ago. I made sure all of wood planking was completely smooth and minus all dents. I covered the model in 5 oz. fiberglass cloth and cover it with resin/Hardener. The planking immediately shine out. I then did a light sanding and gave it one more coat of resin/hardener. When dried I put some auto wax on it. You can purchase this material in marine stores or a good hardware store. My father and i did this a long time ago a real 22 foot ChrisCraft barrel . We did a small corner of the boat first, you can do the same on the model. We did fiberglass the whole boat so that we didn't have to soak the boat at beginning of the summer

Dirty Deeds by Krampus Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 days ago
Trial run of "Dirty Deeds" at the Kochelsee, an alpine lake near the town of Murnau, Germany. Fiberglass barebones hull made in the UK, rest is scratch-built inspired in 1970s Bertram 38 with other elements from Bertram 42 and Bertram 46 convertibles. Originally running with 9.6v NIHM battery, now running much better with 10.8v. Re-powered boat at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wA7YPn8sOj4

Berrinche by Krampus Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 days ago
22.5 inches RC boat inspired on 1970s Chris-Craft Commander 36, 42 and 45 footer boats. Model equivalent to a real-life 36 footer vessel. Barebones fiberglass hull from a UK manufacturer. Powered with a brushed 500 motor, 30A controller, 9.6v NIHM battery. Video made during first trial at the Eibsee lake in Bavaria, Germany.

PT Boat 673 by wcolombo Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 5 days ago
PT Boat scale 1/20 length 1.22 m, Motorization one brushless motor and two 550 14 v motors , fiberglass hull, superstructure in acrylic laser cut, details in resin and 3D print.

Statia Relaint by chugalone100 Petty Officer   Posted: 9 days ago
First and foremost I would like to thank everyone that answered my question about fiberglassing. Your help guided me through the process and I believe that it came out very good, but still needs more work to smooth out the resin and of course I will post more progress pictures later on. The name of the tug is “STATIA RELAINT”. This is one of a fleet of four vessels built by Samakona Yards in Spain. I chose this one because of the stealth lines that has throughout the structure or just because I love how it looks. I am an artist (painter), and we fall in love with colors and shapes, so maybe thats another reason why Im building this particular one. I was lucky to find the plans and enlarge them to 33” approximately 1/32 scale. This will be my FIRST scratch built even dough I have built others from kits, but never like the experts I see in this forum. I will be open for questions, suggestions and criticism. Thank You Julian From Sunny Miami. 😎

Gentlemans Cruiser by muddy Captain   Posted: 10 days ago
Running gear or furniture.. Once the skeleton or frame was completed it's a good idea to dry fit all the running gear, Drive motors shaft's and prop's, plus the radio gear and battery boxes/trays, and even sound unit locations. Then start the skinning. This hull has very curvy bottom skins, in that they turn from the transom to the bow 90 degrees sharply. Tried some test pieces of vertical grain ply, ( 1.5mm ) but it was the same as horizontal grain.. Skins were placed in as large as pieces as possible at about 45 degrees to the keel, or planking in ply.. Not a pretty sight, but makes life a lot easier. The skins were dry fitted with brass pins first, mainly to assist in the cutting of the skin shape. When the bottom skins were completed and rough trimmed the side skins were applied and these were vertically grained, again makes life a lot easier and they fall onto the stringers, means less brass pins and elastic bands. Not forgetting to drill some 1" holes in the breast-hook and No; 1 former, as i always pour in a little Fibre glass resin to help seal the bow section and add some strength. Regards Muddy....

Fairy Huntsman by rolfman2000 Lieutenant   Posted: 12 days ago
Hi Sparkman. It might help if you tell us what size Huntsman it is. 34" or 46". Also what hull. Either wooden, or glassfibre. Also, what sort of performance you expect of it. Are you using brushed or brushless motors ? Hopefully, if you let the group know, you might get an answer. Best wishes, Dave W 😊

Top and hull come together by Rod Commander   Posted: 13 days ago
Just fibteglassed the top and hull together and tried the rubber bumper strip out for scale Looks like it will do the trick Now onto a heap of sanding sanding and more sanding to get it perfect for painting Still not sure what colour I will use but I guess something that stands out amongst the river rapids

How many is to Many by Graham Petty Officer   Posted: 18 days ago
We have just moved house so I (and my wife) are now fully aware of the true situation. I (that is we ) have :- 3-46" fireboats 4-34" fireboats 1-Sea Queen 1-Sea Scout 1-Sea Hornet ,which is unbuilt 1-RM2, which I have owned since about 1964 1-Snoopy hydroplane 1-OS Max 40 powered multi racer from the 1980s 1-54" offshore racer which needs building ...and I just bought a 46" fibre glass crash tender hull A couple are electric but mostly diesel, petrol or glow powered ,including, Super Fury, Racers, Hunters, Frog, McCoy, Merco, a Force 10 and a Gannet. The "problem" would appear to be growing, I recently built a Peacemaker control liner and bought a Pinto 1/2A team racer on Ebay....I can sense the rocket approaching !!

How many is to Many by Helineil Petty Officer   Posted: 20 days ago
I've just been informed by my wife that I forgot to mention a small hydrofoil, a pond yatch and a small glassfibre hull that I had forgot about. O well blame my old age!