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>> Home > Tags > glass

glass
fiber glass
fiberglass
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glass fibre
glass
Mersey ferry Wallasey/Marlowe by onetenor Commander   Posted: 3 days ago
There used to be a display of ferries models in the booking / entrance hall of old Mersey ferries . They were all in glass cases round the walls.I don't know where they are now but could help if you can find them .Try the Maritime museum.👍

waterproofing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
Hi eric Welcome to the site. What type of boat have you bought? Is it a plastic, fibreglass or wood hull? Can you post a pic? We need a bit more detail please so we can give useful advice Dave

arun 54 by battleshipbuff Apprentice   Posted: 10 days ago
There certainly were 2 types of Arun,and these where very much different.Some where made of wood and the later ones of glass fibre composite.There were 52 footers and 54 footers.The sterns on some were very fifferent to others.Adrian Clutterbuck as already suggested is a good man to contact and by joining the Lifeboat Enthusiasts Society, you will gain a whole load of information.I think you will find that the superstructure supplied with most models,is for a 54 foot version. Hope this helps Mick F

Marblehead and swing rig by Paul Millers Seaman   Posted: 16 days ago
I'm looking for a Marblehead yacht and swing rigs almost anything considered as prepared to restore, but not a wooden hull, fibre glass or carbon fibre. I seem to spend a good deal of my time breathing life into wooden hulls, but no more😱.

Dirty Deeds by Krampus Commander   Posted: 17 days ago
Some pics of my favorite build. Made on a barebones fiberglass hull. Runs with a NIHM 10.8 battery, a 540 brushed motor and a 30A controller. Pictures taken by the Olympia Park pond in Munich, Germany.

SG&K 1920 Gentlemans Runabout Mk2 by canabus Commander   Posted: 19 days ago
Hi All The stern is finally covered in with the help of my magnet handle clamps. Fibreglass resin, filled and sanded. Spray putty/primer undercoated. Canabus

Sea Queen refurbishment by BOATSHED Commander   Posted: 19 days ago
Sorry rolfman2000 I wasn't being funny about it, you just had me wondering about it. As you say we all seem to have the same boats. I have both 34" & 46" Crash Tenders both still unmade in the boxes. A 46" to refurbish, Sea Queen and Sea Commander both again for refurbishing, 34" Huntsman and A Huntsman Hull with no top and a Perkasa hull with no top also to refurb. Sea Hornet as well as several other model boats which are fibreglass ones. And a couple of cars and planes but I still cannot fly them, I cannot get the hang of them. You can get the Sea Queen from Vintage Model boats as they are remaking it now.

Precedent Huntsman 34" by canabus Commander   Posted: 20 days ago
Hi Gents I received my drive line last night and installed it and the motor mount, also added a wood block for the rudder. Fibreglass it all it. The prop is a 50mm with 4mm clearance, but, I run 40mm props on my boats this size. Canabus

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
Well Chris I have used this method on various models over the last 50+years and not had one delaminate. I prefer this method for repairs to old boats that do a lot of miles travelling to and from shows in my trailer, as a lot of my vintage boats don't get to sail very often and live in my trailer all year round so need protection from damp air, especially ones made of paper mache or card. The exteriors are coated with eezikote and .8 gsm glass cloth. This is very good protection for balsa and other soft hulls, including polystyrene packing boxes that I used for barges and narrow boats.

Sea Queen refurbishment by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
Hi Doug Resin is heavy and applying by coating the inside of a boat will if the wood is porous absorb lots and greatly increase the weight. The thinner it is the more it will be absorbed. Layup resin is of a similar consistency to liquid brushing paint (not the gel type). It goes more pourable as the temperature increases. It is much thinner than the Isopon resin sold in many car repair packs. Adding styrene will thin the mixture allowing it to penetrate the glass cloth or matting. It is worked well into the mat to keep the weight to a minimum and any excess is mopped up with paper towels. After several coats the fibreglass will be formed and dries rock hard over a couple of days if the correct temperature is maintained. High temps will reduce the time but will be more difficult to work with as the gel stage will happen much quicker. Sorry to rabbit on a bit but I am trying to warn you that you may end up with a very heavy model if you do not use sparingly. If you can get the consistency similar to yacht varnish you can, like me, paint inside the boat including the underside of the deck. Paint out any runs and remove any excess with paper towels. You really only need a very thin coating. If you need to add strength then use some cloth or matting and work the resin well in and mop off any excess with paper towels. If you want to use your brushes and mixing pots again Acetone is the best cleaner but do keep it away from the resin. Both your alternatives would work just as well. It must be Summertime as we keep having rain showers! Cheers Dave

Sea Queen refurbishment by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
Hi All Polyester resin uses Styrene as the solvent. Over time this evaporates and the resin becomes too thick to use for layup of fibreglass. Adding more styrene will restore the resin to its correct fluid layup state. If you use large quantities stored in large cans this is a real lifesaver. Smaller cans do not suffer quite the same as they are usually quickly used. Hope this helps your understanding of Polyester resin. Cheers Dave

Sea Queen refurbishment by BOATSHED Commander   Posted: 21 days ago
Keep Acetone well away from your fibreglass on your boat. It will eat it away, only use it for cleaning tools. I found out the hard way. Lucky it was a very old boat and was almost beyond any more repair. No one was around to warn me.

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
Hi Doug and Chris, Well good question ? So I rang the local fiber glass moulders to see what they had supplied me, as no label on the jar. It is styrene, and I was told to add 10 parts resin to 1 part styrene. And add Hardner/activator as normal before use or spray activator over the coated area, that is the way I did it, and it works. I think it took about 1 hour to be touch dry, but I left overnight before recoating. Apparently this mix is sprayable using a high pressure low volume spraygun. ONLY USE ACETONE TO REMOVE RESINS AND CLEAN TOOLS AND BRUSHES, DO NOT THIN WITH ACETONE. Best of luck Colin.

Precedent Huntsman 34" by boaty Commander   Posted: 22 days ago
I like the Precedent Huntsman very much and I built one from the kit many years ago. It was the wooden hull version and it was quite fast with an MFA 850 Torpedo motor running on 12 volts. I sold it in 2004 and now I wish I hadnt. However I bought a 34 inch fibreglass hull this year at the Ellesmere Port show and I wondered if Precedent are still manufacturing kits as I have no plans for the superstructure. Boaty😎

Dolphin 16 (19) by AllenA Commander   Posted: 27 days ago
[Score: 7/10] 19"/1100g Dolphin 16 (19) Capable of 10mph and a runtime of 20mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 30mm) Direct Drive to a Graupner Speed 600 8.4v (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (7.2v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Chinese 320amp (10Amps) ESC - Comments: This is the Meccano Magazine January 1967 issue plan, built in balsa. I didn't do a build blog as the construction is well covered on the net. Started with an A4 plan and used Excel to enlarge it onto 9 A4 sheets. I chose something simple as I haven't built a boat for thirty years. Really enjoyed the build and re-learning how to overcome the problems that always arise. She is oversized being 19" long and having a 7.5" beam. She sits nicely on the water and begins to plane. Will upgrade the the battery sometime. The decking is worktop edge strip pre-glued but in future will use the unglued strips. The cabin was adapted to extend over the whole boat as there was little space for modern electrics. I will add in and out air vents as the motor will need to breathe. Also, the true model should have an upper deck and windscreen and this will be easy to add sometime in the future. Really surprised and pleased with results from aliphatic wood glue. The finish, which I am not completely happy with, due mostly to my own impatience, was achieved with Ronseal multi purpose wood filler, lightweight fibreglass laminate with Eze-Kote. Paint is Acrylics and Marine varnish. The electrics are: Acoms AR 201 Reciever, Servo Acoms AS 12, Cheap Chinese ,supposedly, 320 amp ESC and 7.2v Nimh battery pack. The Graupner Speed 600 8.4v, bought it cheaply some months ago, was already in one of my boxes and you can see the adaptation required to fit it into the boat. All the Acoms controls I picked up at a boot sale including an Acoms Techniplus Alpha Transmitter on 27mhz. Inside I used Hammerite Smooth Gold as I couldn't buy silver. Modern Hammerite is thin and squeamish and took 3 coats to provide reasonable coverage. One final rant I do like the new silicon wires but they are a nightmare to solder to a motor. I think I will use soldered connectors in future. So there we are, first model in 30 years and now so many models to build and so little time. Lessons learned...... don't be impatient.