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>> Home > Tags > grey primer

grey primer
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Deck Colour by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
Evenin' George, any mid to dark green would do nicely. Suggest a satin / semi matt paint. Something like the Humbrol 131 or 195 in the attached chart. Of course it doesn't have to be the little Humbrol tins (unless you have an airbrush😉) but a similar colour in aerosol, maybe from Tamiya. Type depends on what was on it before!! To be on the safe side give it a couple of thin coats of grey primer first. Flat off with 600 wet & dry then apply the colour coats. E.g. acrylic. Where on earth, and when, can you sail up there in the frozen North!? 😲 Good luck, and have fun, cheers Doug 😎

Sanding down. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Peter, wow 24 ltr tank 😲 mine's only about 10max I think. Yep regulator and oil / water strippers are indispensable for best results 👍 Sounds like you have a nice setup there. Mine is the Revell Master Class with all the trimmings so sort of semi-pro 😉 I also have two 'guns' (one single action and one double action) for large and small quantities and a variety of needles and jets from fine line (without the guts to test it yet😁) to large areas like hulls. If you go to a DIY place that the pros also go to (Building Supplies?) you should find acrylics in half and 1ltr cans. For my 'grey ladies' (up to 1.5m long) I use the 1/2 ltr cans of RAL standard colours, e.g. RAL 1001 is medium navy grey, RAL 7035 is a lighter grey more like the RN hull colour. 1/2 litre thinned to the consistency of milk (low fat😉) does a lot of hulls and you don't want it to harden in the can do you! 😡 A good shop should be able to mix any colour you want. Take the paint chart with you and the mixer should be able to look up the mix code on a computer. If he hasn't got one - go somewhere else!! You should also find the primer filler there (usually only grey I'm afraid), if not go to a pro car supplies shop - you'll find the Protection Lacquer there as well. Cheers Doug 😎

Sanding down. by MouldBuilder Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Started the long job of sanding down today. I think this is going to take a while. During last week I spent the time removing all of the deck parts still attached. The motor, rc gear, rudder, batteries and prop shaft have also been removed leaving the basic hull and decking superstructures. I have visited my local model shop today to see if I can sort out the paint. I have decided on acrylic but the cans are so small that I would need loads. I also cannot find a suitable red for the hull bottom. I am looking for matt. I was also considering making the main colour Pacific Green or similar. I have found Navy Grey which might have to do. If anybody can help with where to source suitable paint in reasonable quantity I would be grateful. I have purchased the sanding sealer and primer. I was considering air brushing the whole project but not so sure now. Any thoughts?😁 I have taken pictures of the progress so far. A lot of sanding still awaits me.😡 I purchased two Mk 17 gun carriages for the tubs. I cannot believe it but they fit perfectly. A picture of these is also below. One last question for now. Should I brush paint, air brush or spray can. The boat is 40" long. Another long day of sanding tomorrow but with greater care as I am tackling the skins. I remember how thin these were when I originally constructed the model.🤔

The Lone Ranger Rides Again or Hull Finishing ;-)) by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Mark, thankyou 😊 The paint is, not surprisingly for me, from a German manufacturer: Peter Kwasny Gruppe. They also make the pro car paints I sometimes use. It's article number 320 078. Königsblau / Royal Blue. The can top is darker than the finish actually turns out! To me it's lighter than Royal Blue but I'm happy with it. I also used - the white primer from the same company; article number 320 411, before that light grey filler primer, # 233 032, and finally clear high gloss protective lacquer # 633 017. The blue and the white primer I found in a local building supplies store under the name 'Hit Color Decospray'! They are specified for indoor and outdoor use; emission class A+. 👍 You might find something similar in your local DIY shop. I think your Puffer would look superb in this colour. If you want a darker shade you might try a thin coat of matt or satin black after the primer? The primer filler and lacquer I bought online some time ago as part of a Pro Scratch Repair kit for my last car. Now what can I do with the rest of the Toyota Navajo Red ??? I sent them the paint code from my car registration and they mixed up an absolute perfect match and delivered in about 10 days 😊 I'll dig in the archive for the web link. Ciao, Doug 😎 PS I think you're right, I'll go for Gold (😉) and hope I don't mess up the hull! Tamiya tape should help.

Hull ready to paint! by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Planking done, deck stained, some deck detail added (most detailing will follow painting and varnishing). Hull has had a good sanding with wet n dry and has had the grey primer added. Have also given the bottom of the hull a coat of red oxide primer. Following this and any blemish removal, I will get the airbrush fired up for Tamiya hull red for the bottom and then humbrol midnight blue for the upper hull sides. This will be separated with a strip of white trimline before adding rounders and lettering prior to laquer.

Finishing line in sight! by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Had a couple of hours of good light after work so cracked on a bit more. Finished the last Bulwark and all the splash boards (if thats what they are called?), sanded and sealed. Last job of the day was to spend some time masking the whole hull leaving just the deck available for a few coats of Halfords grey primer which will be the final deck colour. No more work until saturday now, but next thing is to continue masking leaving the Bulwarks available for spraying white. This to be followed by stanchions, rope work, anchor and some weathering before a final few coats of laquer (Less the deck that will be matt varnished. Still a few jobs beyond all this inc bath test and ballast as required and a few other bits n bobs, but she's getting there!

PT109 Refit by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
Hi Dave, Welcome back! Thanks. Yep I believe you're right. Originally it was allegedly dark sea grey all over. But by the time of the 'big crunch' with IJN Amagiri in August '43 she was apparently so called MTB Green, a much lighter green! With so many possibilities it's another case of 'yer pays yer money and ......'. The lighter green may be easier to see on the lake! 🤓 Anyway, just bought some from Italeri 😉 Revell also seems to think she was light green. Not so sure about a white lower hull though🤔 Thought they were all so called copperoyd!? More or less red/brown primer colour. At least 'as built'. Of course in the field a lot of 'make do and mend' was going on. One thing she definitely wasn't is Zebra dazzle pattern. Ain't doin' that no which way, too much like 'ard work! Think I'll go for MTB Green and a typical brick red lower hull. (Got lots o' that 😉) Or maybe sky-blue-pink with purple spots😲😉 Cheers Doug 😎 PS on the Revell kit the depth charges are missing!

Finishing by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
Hi Martin, Bin round the Talisker ? 😉 @stwdv; ignore what comes next, go to the last paragraph 😎 The scale effect (as I understand it) has nothing or little to do with shine! It refers to lightening / fading the colour to fool the brain into thinking an object is further away than it is, and therefore think it is larger. Look at any landscape photo or 'in real', hills or forests further away look lighter or more grey than the green ones in the foreground. There are pros and cons to both as Dave says. Cellulose is history, except from some nitrated cellulose solvents. In the car restoring days of my youth I remember getting crinkling if I used cellulose thinners from a different manufacturer than the paint 😡 @stwdv: if you do it veeeery carefully in very very thin misted layers (barely wet) you CAN put put a different paint on others BUT you need flat of and prime the old paint first. Pay a bit more for your primer (universal types) and ensure that the coating is absolutely complete and totally dry and hardened. Some combinations work better than others. But essentially it is better not to mix and match. It's essenentially the thinners that does the damage, less is more sometimes! Try to avoid cheap aerosols, paying a bit more avoids a lot of heartache and extra work, or throwing things in the bin 😡 They tend to have a fairly wide spread on the nozzles which wastes a lot of paint through over-spray. They also tend to be a bit thick and difficult to control the flow which can cause 'orange peeling or even runs and 'splodges' if the spray stutters. To counteract this one has to spray thinner; i.e. back off more from the object - which causes more over-spray. 🤔 The little spray cans made for modellers are much better than this in all respects than the cheap jumbo cans from the hardware store. Get a decent air brush for the big bits, then you can control the paint viscosity, flow and size and shape of the spray cone. takes a bit of practice but is worth it if you intend to build more models. But I suspect you wanted tips on the preparation! So let's cut to the chase😉 Sanding and filling are the buzz words. Checking the surface very lightly with your fingertips is much more sensitive and accurate than relying on your eyes. 🤓 When you think you got it right put on a THIN coat of primer (matched type to the finishing paint!) and you will soon see the spots you missed! So back to the filling and sanding. Use a very fine filler at this stage. Prime again and flat it off with 240 to 400 wet'ndry. Take off the residue with a damp sponge and dry!!! Go round this loop a few times and when eyes and finger tips agree you are ready for the finishing colour coats. Thin, let dry. Check for blemishes. Fix if necessary, flat off -> next coat. ALWAYS take note of paint can drying / hardening notes. Don't rush or you'll end up doing it again 😉 Hope this helps, bon chance mon ami 😎Doug PS my larger model (mostly warships!) I use resin based paints in half litre cans from the DIY shops and an airbrush. They are hard wearing, come in all colours (RAL codes) and finishes and are easy to mix and thin with turps or white spirit. They take the enamel for detailing with no problems. Snags: take longer to dry, but they are hard wearing and cheaper than millions of 14ml cans 👍

The foam tanks. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
I need to make the foam tanks as two separately removable items to allow the deck to be removed for access to the rudder servo etc. The most intricate part of the foam tanks is undoubtedly the gratings that go over the top of them, fortunately there is a ready-made grating available that makes their construction unnecessary 👍👍. I bought this from modellingtimbers.co.uk, the grating ’WG7’ that they supply is dimensionally perfect for the job and can be easily assembled into the shape required. The casing for the foam tanks was made from a combination of materials, the base is 4mm ply, the back is 2mm ply, the front and sides are 2mm plasticard and the top is 1.5mm plasticard. The grating panel was assembled to the correct length and width for the scale and bordered with some 3mm x 4mm mahogany strip, the grating does not run the full length of the foam tanks and there is a plain section to the rear which will be a plasticard infill. The wood and plastic panels were all cut by knife and only needed the edges trued up with a small plane. All the joints were fixed with superglue with a reinforcing piece on the inside of the joint for strength. At all stages the assembly was checked for square and size and dry fitted in the deck well to check for fit. The grating panel was sanded to a smooth finish and a light mahogany stain applied to just the outer mahogany frame as I quite liked the contrast between the light and the dark woods, they were then sprayed with several coats of satin lacquer and set aside to dry. Before glueing the tank tops in place some short bracing pieces were fitted for rigidity. The tanks were given a rub down with fine abrasive paper as a key and sprayed with two light coats of grey primer and then a final paint finish of BS631 RAF Light Grey, the same as the rest of the superstructure. The two infill panels were painted the same and then epoxied into the grating panels. Before fixing the gratings to the top of the tanks some mahogany trim was applied to the tank sides. I need to devise a method of holding the tanks in place on the deck, probably with some of those small but tenacious little magnets that can be let into the bases of the tanks and concealed on the underside of the deck panel. I’ll need to make the suction hoses soon and that will involve a bit a brass turning by ’you know who’ so I’d better get busy with some engineering drawing for the man with the lathe 😉

Painting the deck & superstructure. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
Although the colour of the grey primer and that of the textured finish look quite good together I am committed to use the custom colour paint that I had mixed for the deck finish. The masking process took a while to do thoroughly as I didn’t want any overspray problems at this late stage but once I was satisfied I applied the first light coat of the ‘BS631 RAF Light Grey’ finishing coat. After a 20 minutes or so the second light coat was applied and then left overnight to harden, two coats on the deck is sufficient as I don’t want to fill the texture finish and ruin the effect. The deck was then masked to leave the cabin sides and superstructure exposed so that I could put a third and fourth coat of the colour on those areas. The resulting gloss finish looks quite good and will be a good contrast to the textured decks that will be finished in matt lacquer. The masking on the decks was then removed and the cabins and superstructure masked up to just expose the decks to receive two light coats of the Halfords matt lacquer. Everything was left for a few days to harden before all the masking was removed to reveal the final result of the painting process. The overall result is very pleasing and was well worth all the time and materials used to achieve it. The custom colour has a slightly 'greenish' hue in contrast to the grey primer that I have been looking at up until now and took a while to get accustomed to but I can say that now really like the colour scheme and that it is reasonably true to the prototype 😁

Wheelhouse roof detail....and a paint problem ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
Hi Javro. I tend to use light coats when painting but rattle cans dispense a volume of paint quite rapidly unlike an airbrush that is far more controllable. The paint system on the roofs is three coats of sanding sealer, one coat of grey primer, one initial coat of white primer and a further one over the additional details, and then two coats of gloss. At all stages the coats are flatted with wet & dry and there's usually at least a couple of days between coats and any solvent completely flashed off. The Halfords white primer was definitely the cause as it was dispensing more solvent than pigment and that, I believe, is what caused the underlying layers to split. Perhaps I'll look to getting a decent airbrush before I tackle another project. All part of the learning curve as they say !

The fire monitors by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
The fire monitors are supplied in three pieces that need to be assembled, there is the pedestal, the main body & handles and the discharge nozzle (my descriptions, they may have a proper technical term!) 🤔 Before assembly all the parts were filed smooth, and cleaned with my ‘suede shoe brush’ to remove flash and blemishes and to give a key for subsequent paint. I felt that just glueing the main body and discharge nozzle together would not be sufficiently strong so I bored out the centre of each and inserted a 4mm threaded stud to pull them together, some threadlock on the stud and then some filler at the join produced a good result. The hole at the end of the discharge nozzle also looks more authentic. The pedestal was also bored out at both ends, the lower end for a 3mm stud and for a 2mm threaded stud at the upper end. The arms need to be carefully bent to the correct angle, you only really get one attempt at this as the white metal will not stand repeated bending and will probably fracture quite easily. I also added a small 'lever arm' feature to the bottom of the pedestal that appears in some photographs of the real item, this was finished with a hand turned brass knob. The finished parts were sprayed with one coat of grey etch primer, a coat of white primer and finally two coats of Halfords ‘Toolbox Red’ acrylic gloss. I assembled the two pieces when the paint had hardened and put a dab of red paint on the top fixing nut. The handle ends will also be detailed with some black paint or perhaps some black heat shrink.

Painting the wheelhouse & forward cabin roofs. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
Back to the painting now, starting with the wheelhouse and forward cabin roofs that need a couple of coats of white primer over the grey primer which has been flatted down. The two coats of white primer were also flatted down and left for a day to harden before the first coat of Halfords ‘Appliance White’ gloss was sprayed on. This initial gloss coat is to see how the gloss goes on and to reveal any surface defects. I still need to drill more holes for some white metal fittings and make some tapered circular spacers for the searchlight and aerial bases so the final gloss coats will go on after that. After the first gloss coat dried I could still see some wood grain ‘grinning’ through the finish so I expect I’ll need to put on a few gloss coats with a thorough flatting down between before I achieve the level of finish I’m aiming for.

Priming the hull. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
Again, not a particularly exciting stage of the project so there's not too much to say here. 😑 The hull is ready for its primer coats, but I first masked off the hull around the water pickup tube flange, skeg and propshaft and gave them a coat of etch primer to ensure that subsequent paint layers stick properly and after that had dried I put down the first coat of Halfords grey primer after pre-warming the spray can in a bucket of warm water. The second coat went on about 20 minutes later. I will leave the primer to dry and harden for a few days before I flat it down in preparation for more paint. In the meantime I'll start doing some work on the white metal fittings, hopefully that will be more interesting to read !

Spraying the deck and superstructure. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
As the spray booth seems to be working as planned I next decided to put some primer on the deck and superstructure. Not much to say about this really, it's not a particularly creative or rewarding process but as this is the foundation of the paint process it's as important as the final coat and thus worth getting right from the outset. After masking off the various openings and the hull I put down the first coat of Halfords grey primer. I pre-warmed the can in a bucket of warm water for a short while and gave it a thorough shake for the prescribed two minutes and it seemed to go on very easily with an even coating. The booth is quite roomy and very easy to move the can around to get into the difficult areas without removing the boat from the booth to turn it around. A second was applied after about 15 minutes and the whole thing left to dry in the booth. I'll tackle the hull next but first I need to mark out the transom for some detailing and drill a hole into my precious hull for the water cooling outlet. Last picture is yours truly, first and last time you'll see me, much better looking with the mask on I've been told 👋