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>> Home > Tags > heat gun

heat gun
heat shrink
heat gun
Fitting the rubbing strakes. by Joburg-sailor Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 7 days ago
When planking a static galleon model I boiled the strakes for 5 mins but think that this expanded the wood that resulted in slight shrinkage on drying out. Never thought about just wetting strakes and using the heat gun. Great idea that obviously works well. I am enjoying this read hugely.

Fitting the rubbing strakes. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
Before I can apply the final coats of epoxy on the hull I need to fit the two rubbing strakes. I started with the bottom rubbing strake which runs along the chine where the side skins and bottom skins meet. The strakes meet the external keel at the bow and also extend across the stern. I used a length of square section of obeche which needed a gentle curve towards the bow, rather than steam the wood I soaked it in water for a few minutes to soften it and then used a heat gun while bending the strip gently to the required curve. When the wood had cooled and dried the bend was set I did a test fit and drilled very fine holes through the strip so that the modelling pins I use to hold the piece in place would not split the wood. A 30 minute epoxy was used to fit the strakes on both sides of the hull and stern. Above this bottom strake is a second rubbing strake and this also meets the keel at the bow and runs across the stern, I used a broader and thinner obeche strip for this and it was prepared and fixed in the same way. The final pieces to fit will be the gunwales which run around the hull where the sides meet the deck but I will not fit them until I have planked the deck.

Ships-Ladder by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 10 days ago
Back at it this afternoon, handrails are very solid after overnight cure. Trimmed the rail ends to the necessary length. Glued in place. Built a ships ladder, first time for this, think it will work. Need to get ships ladder set to finalize railing. Ladder railing is seen in photo, I make bends like on this by applying heat and bending with my fingers. Styrene gets very flexible with heat, but can quickly melt if not careful. I learned not to use my heat gun (used for shrink tubing in my electronics) as it quickly gets out of control. I usually boil water, let it sit and dip the plastic in and out. Easy way to control bends. Joe

Fitting the side skins. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
The side skins are made from 1.5mm ply and require a slight curve towards the bow and I found that this is best achieved by gently warming with a heat gun, which seems to relax the glue between the laminations, so that when bent to a gentle curve and allowed to cool will set the shape very easily. The skins are supplied are slightly oversize and when the skins have been bent they can be roughly clamped to the hull and then marked for trimming, also while the skin is clamped in place the positions of the bulkhead formers can be marked on the skin. Back on the bench the skins were trimmed with a craft knife (with a fresh blade) and then drilled with a 1mm bit to allow pinning through into the formers and strakes. Aliphatic glue was applied to the hull formers and strakes and the skin positioned so that the drilled holes were in correct alignment with the formers and then clamped and pinned in place. Because the skin was pre-formed to the hull shape the clamps and pins are not under much tension and the hull was set aside while the glue set. When the port skin had fully set overnight, the pins and clamps were removed and the skin was finished with a plane to remove the excess down to the strakes and the F1 former at the bow and the sanding ‘plate’ used to finish it all off. Where the side skins meet at the prow there needs to be a wide flat area for the external keel to butt to and so the trimming and sanding there will be done at a later stage before the bow blocks are fitted and carved. The process was repeated for the starboard side skin and while the glue was setting I gave some thought to a means of concealing some of the wiring that needs to run the length of the hull 🤔.

Spraying Again....... by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Well had a break of a few weeks, now back on the job. So now have a Red Oxide boat rather than Yellow one……………… Although these next stages are a bit ‘ samey’, I have learnt a few things as it happens. For example, I had put three coats of the Halfords filler/primer on a couple of days before I had a break. Now when I left it all looked dry, well covered and ‘solid’. When I came back to it some weeks later the longer drying period had shown up some gaps. Well not gaps actually but ‘mouths’ where tissue I had overlapped had pulled apart slightly. Interesting, easily fixed with some 240 grit sanding, showing that the drying period is longer than it would appear. At least for filler/primer which is a much thicker substance than just spray paint. With the sanding, I had not appreciated the difference between the grades say from 240 upwards (or is it downwards) as my experience was with doorframes and floorboards. For the stage I am at, 240 and 400 seem very effective and leave a good surface. What I did find was how important dust becomes……………… The sandpaper rides on it (the powdery dust) and so becomes much less effective and I found brushing with a thin 2 inch brush worked well, using the vacuum cleaner to clear up later. I did try blowing it off with the heat gun but that put the dust up in the air too much. It is my intention to try ‘wet and dry’ approach for later coats and looking for a better answer when it comes to finishing coats. Another interesting discovery was coverage per rattle can. It may be my ‘beginner’ technique, but it seems to take a lot of paint. On this size of boat hull, 44inches (112cm) by 14 inches (36 cm), it took a 500ml rattle can of yellow filler/primer for three coats. For two coats of the red primer it took the whole of a 300ml can. Also discovered, using these ‘rattle cans’ for the first time, that the primer on its own comes out differently to the filler primer. This unsettled me for a minute or so but appreciate may be due to the different density so will be aware next time. Another issue that became obvious was…………..I must improve my ‘masking off’ ! So that is it so far. Next stage is - going to buy a couple more cans for the finishing coats, do a bath test, mark the white line point, more sanding down and then start applying the finishing coats. Any helpful comments will be much appreciated. NPJ

Bending thin plywood by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
A hair dryer/heat gun played on one side of the ply while bending it to the hot side. bend it a little more than needed and hold in that position or strap it in position round a tin till cool. Oh yes wear gloves to save your fingers.👍 Or get some flexi ply. it is made easily bendable in one direction. Can be rolled very tightly. used in cabinetry in kitchens etc for boxing in curves.👍

Range Safety Launch? by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi Neville, I recognise the 'I want it all and I want it now syndrome' cropping up again😉 Wev'e been down this road before haven't we!? You don't have any "structural' problems. The original builder simply cheated and covered over the 'back bay' instead of fitting it out. And - Why do you want to mess with the cabin tops? To get the boat going for some fun just leave the superstructure like that for now and think about it and fiddle with it in the winter. The deck looks fine from the photos. Just flat off with some 1000/1500 grit wet & dry and give it a spray of medium sea grey and finish with satin or matt varnish. After you've fixed and repainted the hull. If you do all we've said to fix the hull, and apply the fix up to the joint of hull and deck there will be as good as no chance that the deck will leak. When all is said and done YOU saw the boat before you bought it and YOU had a specific purpose in mind apparently. Namely; some quick fun. Soooo - fix the hull, have some fun learning to drive it, and leave the fiddly bits and embellishments until the 'closed season'. Then you can deliberate and decide if you want to restore it as an RSL or convert it into something more exotic. Looking forward to your cogitations on the electrical layout😉 What Action bits are you thinking of using? BTW: if you had a fire at all with the heat gun either you have it too hot, turn it down to about 300 -350°C, or you're hanging about too long in one place. The gun should only be just hot enough to start the paint surface bubbling up. ATB Doug

Still Stripping......With Care! by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Starting to feel a little better about this. Still many things that can go wrong on me, but for anyone else who has not done this before, try it. If I can do it anyone can! This second period of scrapping has been much easier. Twice the area covered in half the time taken in the first session. Yes I have left some of the ‘twiddley bits’ for later and going for the larger areas first. I am hoping to get away with leaving the deck to a rub down and re-paint. What has become more obvious as I progress is the need for space and preparation when using a heat gun. Completely invisible, a lot of heat is generated ( mine can produce 600c but I am using it on 450c) and it travels a surprising distance. I found I did not clear the floor enough or allow a large enough clear area around me. Others may manage in a very small space, but I was surprised by how much paint/material there was coming off with each push of the tool. This fell to the floor and smoked………… When pointing the gun away with one hand whilst scrapping with the other it is easy to lose track of where the gun is pointing! Having somewhere safe to put the gun down when hot is critical, as is having at least a damp cloth if not more to hand to ‘damp down’. I will not post more on this until the stripping and sanding are finished, but I am surprised as to how satisfying the work is yet it looks so challenging at the outset. TTFN. NPJ.

'The Stripper' by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
It seems that the proper procedure for fixing the leak and then moving on to “the good stuff” is to strip all the paint off and see what we have. So the heat gun has been obtained ( I already had the fire extinguisher..) as amongst other reasons there would be less dust. Time for a few tentative steps. Now at this point I am not only well out of my comfort zone, but up to my knees in my “slough of despond”………………………. After all, I bought a boat to sail this month and so far I have drilled holes in it and am now about to set it alight! First image shows efforts with lower heat and using the tools supplied and the next two show temperature taken up to 450 degrees c and a ¾ inch chisel used to remove paint. A much better outcome. Now who suggested that would be the answer I wonder??? 45 minutes spent to get this far and although I did remove the plastic props ( being replaced by brass anyway) I wondered if I should remove prop shafts? I have used a bit of a deflector to reduce the heat anyway. On the final images, I wonder whether I am down far enough to start sanding or to go further. Now that I have started I hope to complete at least the general stripping tomorrow. TTFN. NPJ

Range Safety Launch? by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Yes Sir! Of course Sir! But I have already spent the money................ I will give it to one of the boys for Christmas Hey the heat gun came today and it had 'bits' with it. I have a few images which I will put up later. Going to try it out in about five hours. Came across this image . Puts my leak problems into perspective. All the best . NPJ

HMS Sabre, Scimitar-class preceded by Archer-Class by CB90 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
[Score: 5/10] 26"/1400g HMS Sabre, Scimitar-class preceded by Archer-Class Capable of 12mph and a runtime of 15mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 35mm) Direct Drive Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through China 60A (30Amps) ESC - Comments: Just finish this little boat, need to have its first trial on the water to measure current draw and perhaps modify the prop size. Make sure water cooling works, and the thing steers ok, as rudder is off set. and may have to be move into the prop wash. The Motor 3650 4Poles 3060KV Brushless RC Motor for 1/10 RC Car Boat 1. 4Poles design, high torque and high efficiency. The overall efficiency exceed 90 percent. 2. Low heat production, long lifetime, strong overload protection and it can function 95% of its features without any heat sink appliance. 3. High quality materials adopted: high intense aluminum alloy anodizing shell , front and back cover , high-performance temperature-resistant magnetic steel and imported high-speed bearing. Specifications: Model: XTI-3650/4.5D Dimension: 50 * 36mm KV(RPM/V): 3060KV Poles: 4 Max Power: 1300W Max Voltage: 19V Max Amps: 68A Shaft Diameter: 3.2mm Shaft Length: 15mm Connector: 5.0mm Banana Connector. The real boat Builders: Halmatic Operators:  Royal Navy Preceded by: Archer class In commission: 2003 – Active: 2 General characteristics Type: Patrol boat Displacement: 24 tonnes (24 long tons) Length: 16 m (52 ft 6 in) Beam: 3.1 m (10 ft 2 in) Draught: 1.2 m (3 ft 11 in) Propulsion: 2 × MAN 2480LXE diesels, 2 shafts Speed: 32 knots (37 mph; 59 km/h) Range: 260 nm (480 km) at 19 kn (35 km/h) Complement: 5 (1 officer, 4 ratings) Sensors and processing systems: Racal-Decca Bridge-master 360, I band navigation radar Armament: 2 × General purpose machine guns (stern-mounted)

Bit of a problem............. by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
So heat gun should arrive tomorrow.....................Oh I do like buying new toys! Given that I am now going to destroy all the decals, should I be changing the number on the hull and would that mean a change from Blue to Black? I should not be asking this, but looking it up. However, you have it in your head. Enjoyed the 'woodies' bit elsewhere. TTFN.

Bit of a problem............. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi Neville, yep, only took about a half hour per hull 😊 And NO DUST 😉 If adjustable use the gun on medium heat and don't get too close or too long on the same spot or you'll scorch the wood. As soon as the paint starts to bubble or flake lift it with a not too sharp but not blunt 3/4" chisel. The gun will blow it off in chunks. I found that the chisel was more effective than a normal scraper. Work the gun from side to side just ahead of the chisel. After that I shone a very bright light inside the hull, which instantly showed up the holes and thin spots. I ringed them all with a felt tip and they then received extra attention and fibreglass strengthening. That'll fix your leak wherever the heck it is😊 Eeezy peezy😉 So - Tally Ho matey! Cheers, Doug 😎 PS I didn't have to 'scrap' either boat 😁😁 PPS I love the embedded insect fossils in your hull! Or are they cave paintings?? 😁

Bit of a problem............. by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
So that stripping Doug was done with heat gun and scrapper? I would go for that. Onetenor, if you are reading this............Thanks for the suggestions. Always welcome and I have a long way to go with this! NPJ

Bit of a problem............. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Evenin' Neville, For God's Sake (Whoever he may be) put the wire brush back in the drawer and save it for cleaning engine blocks😲 Use a heat gun and a scraper to get the paint off without destroying the wood. Like I had to do with my Gina 2 fish cutter and PTB hulls. Much less dust than trying to sand / wire-brush the paint off. That way will take you a month of Sundays anyway. The sand the hull flat and cover it with two layers of fibreglass tissue and resin. I used EzeKote, no mixing, no smell, sets in about 20 minutes and brushes wash out in warm water. 😊 Apply a final coat of resin. Sand flat and prime. The pics show these three stages for the cutter and the PTB. If the crack is bad reinforce it on the inside with a couple of layers of tissue and resin. Then give the whole inside of the boat two coats of resin. Take out anything that stops you getting down to the underwater hull and keel joints. That should fix your leak once and for all, strengthen the boat to help prevent any further hull damage if you hit something underway and give you a good base for the final colour coats. Bon chance!👍 Now back to fixing the prop shaft in my cutter.😉 Cheers, Doug 😎 Oh, and by the way - 'DON'T PAY THE FERRYMAN'!