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>> Home > Tags > keel

keel
keel
Emma C Berry Schooner by alan20 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 1 day ago
Scratch built from old kit plans but planked and fibreglassed rather than balsa sheeted as in the original. Modified to fit a removable keel. Winch and continuous loop sail control fitted under deck.

20th Scale ELCO 80ft PT boat part 6 by CB90 Admiral   Posted: 5 days ago
Dry fitting pro-shafts (Note, all shafts parallel with the keel) Drilled with an old prop-shaft which I modified to a cutting tool then finished with a round file and cut slots for propeller-shaft support bracket with a hacksaw, file and knife. Note these shafts are lightweight aluminium tube with steel liners and steel shafts. props at currently 40mm but as with all things scale things are not always practical in scale size such as propellers and rudders and in this case the direction of rotation (not all going round clockwise).

ELCO 80 103 class Rudder positions by CB90 Admiral   Posted: 5 days ago
I am after some information on the ELCO 80ft 103 class, I have gathered conflicting data on the positon of the three rudders relative to the propeller shafts. Some say inline, others say outboard of shafts. Port and starboard shafts of early examples were set 47inches from the centre line (keel). The Italeri plastic kit shows them in line. I have seen pictures of a latter boats were the rudders are not directly behind the propellers but not sure about early boats like the 103 class.

Leaking Boat! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 days ago
Hi Neville, Some intriguing suggestions here 😉 Good luck with the bicycle pump 😁 To be brutally frank! There are no short cuts to leak proofing an old wooden hull properly🤔 1 Internal deck / xyz mounting notwithstanding, if there's something wrong with the hull I want to know it so I can fix it - for good! If the probable source of the leak is hidden by some internal deck or mounting for xyz it has to come out! 2 To be honest, looking closely at your pics of the hull underside it's obvious she has had a few knocks. I would want to sand back, seal and repaint at least the red underside. Having so cleaned the hull off I would closely inspect all joints around the keel and chines and look for signs of previous water intrusion and soaking into to keel especially - potential delamination / capillary action through the keel or joints. When the hull is fully dried out and sanded back I would seal it with a couple of coats of Ezekote; the first coat you can thin with a little warm water so that it soaks into the wood better. Don't overdo it, about 10-20% water is enough. Second coat pure resin. If it looks 'patchy' give it another coat of pure resin. Dries so fast all this doesn't take long. Had to do all this on my fish cutter hull, Gina2 - see Blog! Was a sieve to begin with, afterwards she passed her ballast test with flying colours😊 See also my Sea Scout Jessica Blog. After that repeat your bath test, with ballasting to waterline, and KEEP AN EYE ON IT so you can see where any watter creeps in from!😉 If you take a short cut now you may well have to do it again (properly) some time😁 cheers, Doug 😎

Range Safety Launch? by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
Hi Neville, that far forward I would definitely look for some hull damage forward; crack in a seam or delamination? When you find it clean off all the paint around it, seal it with EzeKote and repaint. Inside fill either side of the keel in that bay with resin. Check also the skin joints around the chine. Re motors; I don't see any suppression capacitors 😲 and the motors (or the one I can see) are mounted very high giving a very steep shaft angle! Will tend to push the bow down at speed instead of planing🤔 Ciao, Doug 😎

Range Safety Launch? by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
Evenin' Neville, Re Leak- Where did the water collect? Anywhere near the end of the prop-shafts? Whatever; as soon as it's dried out give it a good internal coating of EzeKote from Deluxe Materials, no pong and no hardener resin. Brush it on generously and leave to dry/harden overnight. Put PLENTY down in the bilges around the keel boards. Brushes you can simply wash out in warm water. Very 'People friendly'👍 After that carefully inspect the outside of the hull for flaked paint, cracks and delamination of the skin or keel wood. Re scale for fittings- "Some of the 1/16th look better than the 1/12th and 1/24 is in with a change for some bits!" Don't quite get the last bit! Whatever 😉 The original was LoA 43' = 516". So your model with 44" is without doubt as near as dammit 1/12. (1 to 11.727😁) Owt else for the fittings would look a bit 'Gulliver's Travels' 😲 Re Build Blogs; the most comprehensive one I've seen here on Fireboats is Robbob's outstanding build and incredibly detailed and informative blog 👍👍👍 https://model-boats.com/builds/view/23951?goto=44797 Can't wait to see what electrics you've ordered, another big white delivery van full of surprises?😁 Bon chance mom ami, Cheers, Doug 😎

Sterling Emma C Berry by Mikep Lieutenant   Posted: 14 days ago
Model is 49” long and with ballast keel added weighs 17 lbs. hull is covered with 2 layers of 2 oz. cloth fiberglass cloth and painted with Krylon spray can paint. Hitec sail winch servo for main sail and standard servo for jib. Model has auxiliary 6 volt electric power to compincate for my sailing ability’s and wind conditions. Sails are Mylar.

Emerald - "Round the Word" ocean racing yacht. by East-RN Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 17 days ago
Auto Bailout Modification. 1. I drilled small holes in the lower corners of the cockpit wells, opposite each other. These were then connected together with some small brass tube. This was to allow the water to flow from the front cockpit to the rear cockpit. (See pictures 1 and 2). 2. Two more holes were drilled in the rear cockpit, in the outer corners further aft. these were fitted with brass tube stubs. These were to take the plastic tube, which runs to the nozzles fitted into the hull (see picture 3 and 4). 3. To ensure the water would not flow into the boat, while stationary, the tubes were run through small eyelets on the under side of the deck(see picture 5). 4. Small holes were drilled in the hull and brass tubes were cut and bent, so that they would pass down through the hole in the hull, and lay flush against the hull, with the opening facing aft(see picture 6 and 9). 5. On the outer hull, the tube is built up, and covered in a cone shape, so the tube opening is the widest part of the cone and flush( see picture 7 & 8). 6. When the tubes are fitted to the stubs on the aft cockpit, and the cockpit secured in the yacht, the bale out is complete. Principle: While the boat is still and on an even keel, the cockpit floor is above the waterline, the tubes raise up to the deck level which prevents the water from flowing up and into the yacht. When the yacht starts to move under sail, the water flowing over the outlet nozzle is forced out by the cone, and creates a small vacuum at the nozzle opening, which draws any water in the cockpit through the tube and out through the nozzle. During a gust or strong winds, the yacht will heel over more. This will bring all the cockpit water to the lower side bailout tube, and be drawn out by the vacuum. When the yacht slows, and becomes even keeled, the cockpit will have been emptied. During heavy gusts, I found that the yacht will heel excessively, and if the waves are high enough, the cockpit will take some water over the deck. This is why I fitted the bailout device. So after a long sail in heavy weather, a long cruise back to shore on a broad reach and more even keel, will ensure the cockpit is dry. Happy Cruising

SuzyQ by Grumpy1949 Lieutenant   Posted: 19 days ago
I have built a few of Vics plans and found them very easy to construct. He does build them a bit heavy an underpowered but.....they are solid and safe.......Starlet, Hydro bat, Scudder And currently got the Zing Ray under construction. The Starlet is a dream to sail. Hydro bat very fast and very responsive to water rudder input. A favourite with the grand kids. Scudder looks quite weird but it lives up to its name. Grandkids love this as well. Another water rudder model. If these are used in really weedy lakes the rudder will pick up some trailers so i have fitted a 3mm rod running from mid keel to lower rudder pivot point. The weeds simply slide off. The Zing Ray is a shovelnose hydroplane still under construction. The biggest source of quite a bit of discussion is the conversion from ic to electric. Using a base of 3.5cc produces 400w or about 1000grams of thrust, these models seem to work ok. And yes i am a Vic Smeedfan 🤓

Inspiration for beautiful boat builders ;-) by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 23 days ago
Yes Martin I agree we are a dying breed in this Virtual Reality Throw Away Rush rush world. But also please don't forget that you are a professional model builder with decades of experience. BTW: my 1/72 HMS Hotspur was absolutely scratch built. My first ever ship model, I was about 13/14 when I started it, with extremely basic hand tools. Kits out of the question and there weren't nuffink like her around anyway. Built to plans drawn up by me on foolscap paper from measurements taken from an Airfix 1/600 kit with a plastic micrometer and scaled up with a slide rule!! Remember them!? Had just started technical drawing at school, very handy. My Type IA submarine, built 30 odd years ago, was a Krick 'kit'! Ha Ha! 4 20mm planks of wood for the hull, a big lump of steel bar for the keel, crude half shell vac-formed tower, and a bag of assorted brass rod and tubing for various fittings. Some brass sheet for the dive planes. 'Thanks for the cash the rest is up to you' sort of deal! A visit to the Deutsches Museum showed up many 'simplifications' in the Krick plan so all the corrections were 'scratch' as well. Notably- Correct hull shape, correct rudder assemblies with skegs, railings, net cutters, flooding slots, wintergarden etc etc. Looks like Gina 2 is going to be a scratch rebuild from the gunn'l up as well. Actually I just thought my post might create a little wonderment and some Oohs and Aaahs, not loose off such a debate. I'll know better next time. Now back to Pete's lighting. Ciao, Doug

Norfolk Wherry Fans by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
Thanks for the heads up.I agree re the Wherry sails being heavy and their being "prettier" And yes they were enclosed. The Dutchies were much lighter with lighter sailcloth as they were on canals and didn't have to contend with the rigours of the sea.Also their journeys were short between pick up and drop off points. Much like a lot of our canal boats. Often carrying domestic supplies so their cargo needed to be "Get attable" frequently hence the tarpaulins instead of Hatch covers. With my barge being just ten inches and made of balsa a heavy cloth would capsize her. Their is little draught just side/draught/lee boards instead of a keel to keep them from being pushed side ways by the wind. I suppose I could just finish it as static but where's the fun in that? LOL Regards John O/T👍

Hellen Fishing Boat by canabus Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 30 days ago
Hi All This year I bought an unstarted kit, but, sold it to a club member. A month later one of the club member wish to swap for a faster boat and as my Sea Commander required a repaint and fittings. I thought a swap for a very good working Hellen was a good deal. So are making a dingy and replacing the broken prop with a brass one I had my second Hellen for the year. Three weeks ago another Hellen pops up on Gumtree(aka EBAY), so it was to cheap not to buy it. While waiting for it to come, I made a new stand, a dingy with oars and a set of fenders. When it arrive the mast where laying on the deck broken, but , the posted pics show that. The motor is a 11 to 1 geared MFA Como 919 D which runs OK. A spare new plastic prop. Started on the repairs, like the keel and deck around the mast bases. The aft mast was broken in half, so I brass sleeved it. The aft sail was missing and the forward sail was all glued up, so I bin it. So this is the boat pics so far. Canabus

Hull Pt2: Motorisation - Come What May!! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
As promised (or threatened?😁) stage two of the hull work and thoughts on motorisation. The hull was sprayed with two coats of grey primer/filler. Pic1. As usual this showed up the remaining imperfections (pics 2 & 3), but I'm not going to worry about them until I've got prop shaft tube and rudder stock sorted out and permanently fitted 😉 After my attempts to make and thread a 3mm prop shaft went awry Martin (Westway the Mechanicals Master👍) stepped in and made me a decent one complete with a bushed stuffing tube 👍 Vielen Dank Meister😊 I did however manage to make a 4mm to 3mm reducer so that I could fit a Rabeosch 35mm prop as seen in pics 2 & 3. The tube and shaft from Martin, arrived Saturday an' he only made it on Monday😊, have been dry fitted so that I can start setting up the gears, necessary to bring the drive down to the prop shaft fitted very low down in the hull, and motor mount. Pic 4. Motorisation: (Remember folks - this kit was designed and built as a static model!) I want to use the old 1950s Taycol Target motor which my Dad originally fitted in the Sea Scout which I have renovated and upgraded to brushless. See Build blog 'Sea Scout - Jessica' Many of you will know that the Taycol motors were field coil motors, meaning that they have no permanent magnet around the rotor coil, and thus reversing the battery connections to the brushes had no effect on the direction of rotation, as this simply reversed the magnetic fields of both stator and rotor coils🤔 To counteract this so that the motor could be used in both forward and reverse with a conventional brushed ESC I modified the motor slightly (separated the two coils) and built a simple converter board to connect it to the ESC. Again see the Sea Scout blog for the details of the conversion. Basically; once the field coil and brush-gear (rotor coil) have been separated a simple diode bridge can be used to apply the output of the ESC to the motor. This enables the reversal of EITHER field OR rotor coil polarity, depending on how you connect the converter to the motor. Thus reversing the direction of rotation of the motor. Beneficial side effect is that the diodes also suppress the commutator sparking😊 In my case, with the Taycol Target, I also cleaned, flattened and polished the commutator. Thus significantly reducing the potential for spark generation in the first place! A peculiarity of the Taycol motors is that they all use metal brushes, pressed phosphor bronze strip, so they need oiling! DO NOT oil conventional brushed motors with carbon brushes unless the brushes are exchangeable or you want to have to buy a new motor!!!!! Pics 5 & 6 show the proposed position of the Taycol in Gina 2 and pic 7 the prototype converter board I knocked up to test the motor, together with a Graupner Navy V30R Marine Brushed ESC. Details and results in the Sea Scout blog, including video of the sparks and oscilloscope pics of the drive waveforms before and after conversion! The latter showing the spark suppression effect of the converter😊 Some samples attached - last 3 pics. Pic 8 pic shows a more compact version of the converter, one of a few types I'm doing for Martin's various Taycols as a trade for the prop shaft he made for me and some useful material he sent. Thanks mate👍 Next steps will be 1) mounting the gears correctly on the shafts, requiring the manufacture of a 3/32" to 4mm adaptor and a 1/8" to 4mm adaptor, and keying them to the shafts - Hooray for mini milling machines 😉 2) manufacturing bushed end plates to hold the gears in place, 3) fitting the motor mounting platform. I'll probably borrow from my experiences of real shipbuilding and do this as a suspended 'false floor', i.e. mounted on stiff springs to enable adjustments to optimise the gearing mesh! On real naval ships this is done to improve shock resistance and to minimise engine noise / vibration conduction to the hull, thus significantly reducing the acoustic signature of the ship. Not that I'm tooo worried about being torpedoed 😁 Worth a try😉 Pic 9 shows the cleaned up and renovated Taycol Target motor. Pic 10 shows the drive waveform complete with sparks before modification.🤔 Pic 11 the cleaned 'forward' waveform with the converter board. Pic 12 the cleaned 'reverse' waveform, no suppression capacitors needed 😉 More soon folks, Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Along the way a new keel was fitted as can be seen in pics 1 to 3. The original builder had 'buried' the keel in the hull planking! 😲

Gwen M Model Yacht by ModelHover Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Has anyone built a schooner (or skipjack) named Gwen M from the Marine Modelling plan No.MAR 2556 and featured in their magazine in the July 1996 issue ? I am trying to ascertain the weight of the lead keel and how it is fixed. Also I am looking for photos of the interior of the cabin to show the arrangement of servos for rudder and sails. Any help would be appreciated.

Vosper Rescue -target towing launch by Lauriem Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
I'm starting to build a Veron kit of the Vosper Rescue-target towing launch, which I bought on Ebay. This boat seems quite rare - well to me anyway - although Belair sell one currently which is similar but slightly larger (34in long - mine is 28in). The kit is obviously old and if anyone knows when these were sold then please let me know. The structure is balsa - not my favourite wood - and ply for the exterior. Balsa does not hold temporary or permanent pins well, and holding things in position while the glue dries is made more difficult. The balsa has been pre-cut to shape and several of the curved pieces are weak in places where the grain is inevitably across the length of the piece. I broke several parts and needed ply backing to repair. Glue used is 5 min epoxy. The keel is made up of several pieces and to get the right shape I photocopied part of the plan and laid the parts on that to set while gluing.