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>> Home > Tags > lacquer

lacquer
satin lacquer
lacquer
Transfers by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
Hmmmm!! Waterproof? Have you ever tested that? I'm not so sure, having used them in the office virtually since their inception. Anyway, when they are mounted on the boat / ship they need sealing in with a coat of clear lacquer or they may sometime 'float' off again. Apart from that have not yet seen any transfer paper made for Laser printers. Transfer paper made for Ink jet printers may melt 😲 in laser printers in the final transfer / fixing unit. I can tell you, it makes an 'orrible sticky mess wot ain't easy to get rid of. Doug

Spraying Again....... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Agreed Boaty 👍 With a plastic or glass fibre hull it's a slightly different kettle of fish. However I'm still wary of the primer absorbing moisture.🤔 Sealing with a matt or silk lacquer seems to give an extra knot or so as well😉 But here we were discussing wooden hulls. Cheers, Doug 😎

Spraying Again....... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Mornin' Peter, Red primer can be a good match for some anti-fouling paints. If you are happy with the colour - fine. BUT!! Seal the primer paint with several thin coats of matt or silk clear varnish for the reasons mentioned to Neville above! Primer is porous!! Flatten the primer with 1000 / 1500 wet n dry until your fingertips tell you the surface is good. Apply the varnish in several thin coats, flattening lightly with 2000 / 3000 w&d between coats, until you have a good sealed surface. The varnish (or lacquer) will also give some extra protection against knocks and bangs 😊 Cheers, Doug 😎

Painting by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
If you intend to stain the wood don't use sanding sealer first as the name suggests it seals so your stain won't take. as for simulated planking I suggest you sand the deck as smooth as possible (down to 1000 grit paper) and the using a scalpel type blade score the deck lines, but be careful as any slip will show on the final deck. After scoring the lines use a stain to rub over the deck and immediately remove the excess with a cloth, the stain will have more effect in the scores thus showing deck lines. When dry remove any excess with white spirit and leave to thoroughly dry, then sand again. This should leave you with a planked deck look which can now be sealed followed by coats of lacquer - Halfords do a clear lacquer. I suggest you try on a piece of scrap ply first. good luck

Sadolin by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Gardener, Don't know the Sadolin stuff, I use Billing Boats stains meself, BUT whatever you use, esp on balsa, apply a coupla coats of sealer first. Then at least one or two coats of clear satin varnish; e.g. from Lord Nelson range from Holland. THEN AND ONLY then, apply your stain til you get the depth of colour you want. After that seal with matt, satin or gloss varnish / lacquer according to taste😉 That's the way I did my Sea Scout 'Jessica' renovation, see blog on this site for results!!! Coupla sample pics attached. The whole process is described in the Blog. Otherwise the balsa will soak up all your stain and still not look right 🤔 A 'preserver' as such is not normally necessary if the wood is properly treated inside and out; sealer, stain, varnish etc! Or just EzeKote resin inside. Stain no needed inside of course. Good luck and above all have fun with your endeavours. 👍 Keep us 'up to date' ('on the running' as my German friends would say; 'auf den Laufenden'!) 😁 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS I like Danish Blue meself 😁😁 On the other hand; I wouldn't have used balsa for speedboat deck in the first place. I use a close grained marine ply 0,8 or 1.0mm. Takes the stain better and looks more realistic. Balsa is too coarse grained for stain and varnish on scale speedboats. Thick coat of paint ... OK. On the cabin roof and after deck (which I had to renew) I used 1.5mm mahogany veneer. If I had to do it again I would use a close grained 0.8mm marine ply (birch or pear) and cherry stain (also Billing) as I used on 'Jessica's deck.

Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
I was just searching for a model car pattern I made months ago for some mods and I found all the lovely etchings I'd done years ago, pre computer, for Riva and Chris-Craft models. These two pics show two brass patterns for the Riva vents and two of the white metal cast vents, one polished about 20 years ago, one done just now, to show that a well burnished casting will stay looking chrome even without lacquer. Then the two Chris Craft tread plates I had the great, good forethought to draw when I found I had a bit of space on the Riva fret. They are perfect, as are the Chris-Craft side flashes and all the Riva badges, even though they were done from hand drawn artwork, proving that Vector images are NOT essential as the pootah people will tell you. I shall mount these two on the typically wedge shaped base and have them cast. I also found a FUEL engraved cap cover which will go on my Chris-Craft filler. It happens to be bang on size wise! I'm cock ahoop! I knew I had these, but had no idea where to start looking. Thanks Mel for getting me started on the search for your Tecno F2 car, but sorry, couldn't find that devil. I have made some more Vincent bits, been to son's to play on his new steering wheel and pedals racing game ( I managed a whole lap of the proper Silverstone in a Lotus 25!) and dined out with the lady wife. What a great day. Martin

Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
If you want it to look like metal, use metal. That alclad is OK, but still looks like paint to me and having to do it in black first (and that coat has to be perfect apparently) is too much of a faff for me. Hammer, as you can see from the response (or lack of it) taking more pictures (never easy for my shit camera) would hardly be warranted and the description says it all really. I have a few more to take, or rather the wife can take em with her Klevafone for me. Filler and cap, exhaust outlet and windscreen supports have been added. Just the bear paw vent to go when I get a bit of 1/8th" through the post. I have 1/8th", but it's that horrible yellow gooey stuff, so I've splashed out on a small bit of CZ120, hard brass. Also called leaded, silicon or engravers' brass. MUCH better to cut and shape. The equivalent for rod, strip and section is CZ 121, extruded. These will all be available to buy once my chum has cast them in white metal and then you just have to burnish with a crewel needle (darning) and you have chrome (lacquer to taste). Martin

Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Interesting Mark, 👍 I'll have a sniff round my local art supplies shop. Can get a variety of woods, profiles, stains, lacquer and resins an' such there as well! Cheers, Doug 😎

Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Thanks Martin, I'll look out for that👍 Yeah, the Lightning is cool, I had the 1/72 version back then. I recently bought the 1/24th kit of the Mosquito, another cool kite! It's a MONSTER and I haven't had the guts to start it yet😉 I recently found on the Krick site some chrome "Racing Paint for Polycarbonate Body's" made by Ghiant Aerosols in Belgium, branded 'RC Car'. Comes in two 150ml cans; chrome spray and a lacquer / fixer. Haven't tried it yet, will report when I have. Cheers, Doug

Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
These are going to be cast in white metal as near to pewter as damn it, so you can burnish them to a nice chrome finish. Then lacquer. I'll turn you some Perspex innards for the light and you can put some clear coloured paint over the Perspex. There's just the bow piece to go, but I can't have the cutwater cast, so that will have to be either aluminium or foil covered brass as it needs to be thin. Cheers, Martin

Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi folks, I've been filling in spaces in the Vincent epic with making deck fittings for the Chris Craft Special Runabout. I can't find or, probably, afford to get them nickel plated, so I will give the brass fittings to a chum who does casting of white metal, then I can a) get more than one of some and b) burnish them to look like chrome and then lacquer them. I'm assuming there might be a measure of interest in how these are done. I'm afraid I can't tell you how to do these without a lathe, because I've always had or had the use of, a lathe. They can be bought for a fraction of the price of a kit, off ebay. My No 1 son bought a lathe exactly like mine (a Peatol, which is same as the Taig), only on a huge base with a nice big motor, a tool rack to hold every supplied, additional tool they make for it and even the book on how to use it and make even more tools for it, virtually unused, for £200. Similar small lathes can be had for even less. It's the brass that costs these days! Anyway, the trick is to break down the shape to that which can be cut, turned or bent. You can do all those things, so all you need to be able to do is silver solder and soft solder. If you can't yet, learn, sharpish. Silver soldering has enabled to earn a living till I retired. It helped me bring up a family of 5, so it's clearly very useful. I won't describe it in boring detail as these days there's a Youtube for every damned thing if you can tolerate that ghastly delivery that so many of them have. I can't, so I'm happy to answer questions if anyone wants to be told straight what to do. Golden rules....make it totally clean with a Swiss file, have sufficient heat, use the right flux. In silver soldering, just sprinkle the powdered flux on, don't bother making a paste, it'll just fizz and shift your little parts. For this part, one of the various patterns of deck lights/flag pole holders that Chris Craft used, I started by turning the main shape of the bulbous bit to be rather like a thimble. I then cut gaps out of it in the vice with a junior hacksaw, so that it had three legs, oversized for now. Then make a teardrop shape out of 1/16th" sheet and cut a hole in it to match. Why the hole? Well, if this is to cast successfully, I don't need any undercuts or "hooks " in the mould so it has to be hollow. Also, I need to put the light lenses in after it's all finished as these units had riding or nav. lights in them. They also had a small jack staff in the top with a burgee or even a national ensign attached. To make the rather art nouveau-ish back end I made a cardboard pattern of what had to be cut from 1mm brass sheet to be folded, hammered a bit and rolled a bit to fit onto the back of the thimble section. I silver soldered the thimble on first, to make it easy to fit the back rolled and folded bit, which was itself then silver soldered on. After that, it's all down to filing to shape, then as you can see from the pencil lines, cut out the teardrop shaped holes in the back which leave a central spine shape. I would first drill a 3mm hole and then, with the piece in a vice use a dental burr in a minidrill and hand mill it out, but PLEASE make sure it can't slip or you could be the owner of a grooved thumb or worse. Finish with files and papers of various grades. More anon when I do the next bits, although you're already further on than I am! Cheers, Martin

Billing Boats St Canute Update by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Looks good but yes sand till flush and seal 3/4 coats sanding between. Then the same with lacquer or varnish. Good look with the hull.👍

Final Finishing before Sea trials ;-) by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
A quick Flashback to May 😲 Got sidetracked with 'lectrickery' an' stuff🤔 Hull was given a final spray top coat and gloss clear lacquer coat. All flatted back in between coats with 3000 grit Tamiya W&D sponges. Used wet with a drop of liquid soap. Then a few hours of polishing with car paint cutting compound and finally with 'anti hologram' polish until it feels like glass.😊 Same polishing procedure for the decks and cabin sides. Fitted a few deck fittings; tank filler caps, which also hold the aft deck down, and 'Jam' cleats fore and aft. Both from the 'Riva' range from Krick. Apart from the cockpit she's done! Need suitable scale crew and cockpit furniture now. Ship's wheel I have but that's it so far. Last pic is a reminder of how the 'old girl' started out last year, after 25 years of neglect in the cellar! Sea Trial soon. Cheers, All, Doug 😎

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
BTW: if you go for the glass lacquer don't apply it with a brush, dip the LEDs and hang 'em up to drip dry! How do I know? Learning by doing!! 😉

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
OK will do👍 Since you've already got a 'lifetime supply' of white LEDs (and I know their spec now👍) it makes sense. In the dim and distant past I used glass lacquer on the old 3V 'rice grain' bulbs to good effect on my destroyer. It might be more difficult to get a decent red and green effect with lacquer though! Suck it an' see before you rush off and buy coloured LEDs 😉 Doug