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>> Home > Tags > leds

leds
leds
MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
Before the funnel could be installed wanted to fit a working radar scanner, navigation lights and the batteries. Decided to use sub C NIMH batteries in plastic holders, they should have the target endurance and provide some ballast. Fitted two sets of 4 cells, one at the forward end of the superstructure and the other at the rear, both at keel level. These were inserted into wooden battery trays to hold them in place. A dry test run showed a full speed motor run time well exceeding the hour target, so will try on water. Also took the opportunity to fit the Rx and then adjust the rudder before finishing off the wiring. Both the navigation lights (LEDs) and the radar scanner work. The radar is driven by a servo with the potentiometer removed and a magnetic drive shaft run up through the superstructure from below the deck. The motor requires about 9 volts to run at what would seem to be something approximating to scale speed; fitted a voltage reducer to allow the lights and the radar to work on less than 6 volts. The mast lights are to be installed in a separate circuit after the masts are added. As I get more into the detail it is evident the GA drawing and the photographs of the vessel in service differ. Fortunately the component locations seem consistent, although the equipment is not. This most apparent in the hold ventilators. The GA shows the standard cowl vents, but the photographs show a mixture between an vertically squeezed oval vent (which am advised is more typically German) and ventilator columns with cylindrical caps. The column style vents with cylindrical caps were easily made from two different sizes of styrene tube with the cap tops made from styrene offcuts. The squeezed oval style vents were more difficult. Broke them down into the major parts of the cylindrical vertical tube and, from a larger tube cut a small ring and filed one end to straddle the tube once it had been squeezed oval. Glued it into place whilst restrained in a small hand vice. Once set, removed and sanded the the two to give a smooth transition, closing the rear aperture off with styrene offcuts. Then resorted to wood filler, filed down to give a smooth, oval vent.

TRIUMPH (CG-52301) USCG Type F MLB by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Laser cut kit from Barracuda RC Boats, N Carolina, USA. Baltic birch plywood false keel, ribs/frames, hull sheathing, deck and cabins. No formal plans; I was able to source a handful of B&W archival photos from the USCG website. Fortunately I was able to procure a motherload of archival photos and a few hard to read layout drawings from Mr. Timothy Dring, LCDR, USN (Ret.). He is co-author of "American Coastal Rescue Craft", which is the "bible" if you will, of such. I do sometimes thank the internet. I am certain that without his assistance, my efforts on this wouldn't have been as enjoyable. The kit was also void of fittings, which I was aware of prior to purchase, so I invested in a 3D printer. That I've used to a limited degree, due to searching for parts in the correct file format is mind-numbing! I have globally sourced fittings; USA, UK, ASIA. As a matter of fact, the searchlights I got from this Model Boat Shop were 3D printed, and I was able to fit 5mm LEDs into them. I'd like to get a couple more and put some superbright 12v LED drone lamps in them for use on my 35" towboat. Many deck fittings are handmade when possible, the cleats and fairleads are from Cornwall Boats, UK. (Very reasonable & diverse source, if you didn't already know.) I try to keep wood natural when detail allows it, as I never have enjoyed painting over natural grain. Her decks are covered with 1/16" scribed basswood sheathing from earthandtree.com, which is normally used for wainscoting dollhouse walls. All my boats that have wood decks are covered with scribed sheathing; I feel it makes 'em look "sexy". Believe it or not, the idea for wainscoting came from finding 3/16" at Hobby Lobby's dollhouse department. A couple of feet x 3.5" was about $16, so I found a less expensive source that also had more selections (earthandtree.com) The rail stanchions are 3/16" square dowels with 2 corners rounded over on the Dremel router table. Leaving their base square, I fit a square peg into a round hole with no glue to facilitate removal, and also for ease of replacing broken ones, which is inevitable. The rail is 1/16" brass rod that also is readily removable. The stern rail is stationary on the lower half, and the chain & wire stanchions are removable for towing ops. The deck coamings and knuckle are African mahogany strips, other mahogany accents came from leftovers of a prior build. I also try on all my boats, to incorporate vintage leftover scribed sheathing salvaged from my late Father's builds, so I know he's got a part in my builds. Note-the raised deck section between the aft ladder trunk and towing bit is actually a laminated deckhouse he made for the Frigate Essex. Unfortunately, he was unable to build that kit due to Alzheimer's disease in his latter years. (I blame that mostly on the hazardous fumes from the airplane "dope" & glue he used when building RC planes in the 60s & 70s.) I use polyurethane instead of resin due to COPD, 37 yrs of smoking, I quit 2.5 yrs ago. The driveline consists of: 775 Johnson DC main (3500 RPM@12V), Harbor Models 4mm x 14" shaft w/brass stuffing box, Raboesch 75mm 5-blade brass wheel (not OEM), 5mm U-joint couplers, Dimart 320A fan-cooled ESC. Handmade wooden teardrop rudder on a 3/8" sternpost, 1/4" tiller arm steered by a Halcion sail winch servo and cable system. Flysky 6 channel. The nav lights and other illumination are Lighthouse 9v LEDs, also a GoolRC Receiver controlled flashing blue Law Enforcement light. Obviously, I put the cart before the horse and completed the topsides and below deck before finishing the outer hull, but the Wx and season change dictated such. Can't wait for Spring!

RSS P71 Sovereignty by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Know the feeling with 'time' for things like synch'ed gun flash and sound! I have loads of miniature LEDs and two programmable sound units with synch switches - as yet only the instructions have been out of the box🤔 My destroyer radar is also independent of the RC - I just put a microswitch under the 'B' gun turret to switch it on 😉

DISCHARGE CONUNDRUM by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Les Thank you. There are three LEDS which change from red to green when fully charged. I can see no mention of setting a half charge. Haverlock was right in thinking each cell was charged by the balance lead so you will be protected from overcharging. The solution is to buy a battery checker theirs is DYN4071 and I have one in my collection. Using the checker involves plugging the battery via the balance lead into the balancer and each cell voltage is displayed sequentially. So you charge for half your normal length of time and check the voltage of each cell is about 3.7 to 3.8v. Bit clunky but would work. A better solution would be to invest in a balancer charger which will automatically charge to full voltage or the storage charge. There are several available some with mains power supplies and others needing a DC power source. Have a look at https://www.componentshop.co.uk/catalogsearch/result/?q=bala... I have a Giant Power G6AC but they all work just as well. Please ask if you need more info

Twin motor control problem by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
John As you are using 2.4Ghz radios there is quite a long delay in the binding between Tx and Rx. The ESCs also perform a set up and I have noticed that this is often quicker than the radio. As a result the ESCs have no signal and can revert to a failsafe state. If you have correctly set up the ESC with the tx then it should retain this setting unless you press the set up button whilst the lights are flashing. I suspect this is at the root of the problem. To restore the settings to your set I suggest you use a separate rx battery, centre the throttle stick and trim and get the Tx/rx working together. Then switch on the ESC and whilst the lights are flashing press the set up button and move the throttle stick full forward (solid green) then full reverse (solid red) return to neutral solid red/green. If you now switch off the esc and rx battery and switch back on the ESC should have solid red/green light showing. Repeat with the other ESC and test. Switch off and connect both escs via the Y lead. You can use one ESC to provide the rx power but do disconnect one red lead. Centre the tx throttle and trim and make sure you switch on the ESC with the BEC connected first. Hopefully both ESCs will now have solid red/green leds. I use three Mtronic ESCs with my RMS Olympic and had a very similar problem. I suspect the change from bench to water is more to do with stick/trim alignment and longer binding time due to other 2.4 Tx working in close proximity at the sailing site. I look forward to hearing your efforts next wednesday - hopefully the next hurricane will have passed by then.

Lights all wired up by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Neil, Don't know how Graham wired his but the simplest is series for each lighting circuit; minimum wiring and only one current limiting resistor calculated to set the specified operating current for the LEDs used. In a parallel circuit the resistor value must be calculated for the sum of the operating currents of all the LEDs in the circuit. Required Resistance = (Voltage Source - LED Forward Voltage) / Max LED Current or R = (Vs-Vf) / Imax As an example, a particular LED has a 3.0 volt forward voltage (Vf) and a maximum current rating of 20mA. It is to be driven with a 5.0 volt source. Therefore, R = (5.0 - 3.0) / .020 or R = 2.0 / .020 or R = 100 Ohms If you do not know the LED specs, typically, a 80-100 ohm resistor will do just fine. All you 'never wanted to know' about LEDs in model boats (or any other model!) you can find here - http://www.laureanno.com/RC/LED-assembly.htm Cheers Doug 😎

Lights all wired up by NPJ Captain   Posted: 3 months ago
Thank you for coming back so quickly. Do not concern yourself about not very elaborate, it looks really great. Impressive show. I assume you had to balance out the number of LEDs. Have they got to be in series or parallel? Sorry but I am very inexperienced in this stuff! All the best. NPJ

Hobby Engine Richardson Upgrade by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Hi Mark, took me yonks to find them all🤔 I also experimented with battery athwartships, hope for better 'roll control' but eventually settled for between the shafts cos athwartships was too high. My 'pico' RX (ca. 5x1.5cm😉) can go almost anywhere, with Velcro to hold it in place. The dual ESC can go where the old 800mAh NiMH was. Later stage: smoke genny and lighting board in the lower superstructure, as apparently also in the latest versions! Mini SMD or strip LEDs for illumination and nav lights, mini 3V geared motor for the radar perhaps. Don't need a radio channel for this, just a switch and a couple of AA alkaline batts and away you go😉 Although these days you almost never see the antenna cos it's hidden in a 'burger-bun' radome a la Furuno! 😉 Somewhere on the WWW spider web I remember seeing a working towing tackle - must dig out the bookmark, might have been Krick! Cheers Doug 😎 Glad you're enjoying it Neil, that's the whole point ain't it? 👍

CG 40564 by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Built in 2016, she is a 1:14 scale Dumas 40 ft. UTB, which I did my best to keep natural wood wherever possible. Powered by twin 775 size 12 volt Johnson type motors turning Raboesch 50mm 4-blade brass wheels. I properly illuminated her with Lighthouse 9v LEDs and adorned with a BECC USCG Ensign. I overbuilt her like my Father overbuilt his airplanes.

3d printing by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Brill👍 Doodle Bug looks great, never get off the ground though🤔 Don't forget the red flicker LEDs to illuminate the smoke on the V2, and of course the appropriate sound VERY LOUD!!😊 Servo and push rod to raise the launch ramp or hydraulics?? Re 50 cals: Don't need the tripods, I plan to mount 'em in tubs on the PT Boat. Don't want to bust your filament budget 😉 so the stl file would be fine. Many thanks. Video of the V2 printing, complete with anguished face of the creator?😉 Cheers Doug 😎 PS what scale are your 50s?

Glazing help by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi Doug The Olympic and Titanic used 5mm and 3mm LEDs in the portholes - all illuminated. The cabins were glazed with overhead projector film, printed with the frame details then individually cut and stuck into each aperture. We had the cabin windows water jet cut so the were all the same size. I used Canopy Glue and the frames had all been acrylic spray painted. All were a close fit and stuck easily. I can appreciate your difficulty with the destroyer, I cheated with my HMS Grenville (1:96), and just cut small holes in the plating and added a dab of black paint to represent. Using the method I described with the frame on the face of the cabin leaves an aperture to glue the window into. A bead of glue will keep the window in place once dry. I find it dries quite clear and rubbery so with sufficient flat surfaces it works very well. Glue'nGlaze is tried and tested if you can get hold of some Dave

As of Summer 2017... by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 7 months ago
After the sail, I added some hardware to the spars, namely jackstays. I also ordered some aircraft plywood and used it to make new winch drums. These are sized to my current plan of only bracing the tops'l yards. Hopefully, this is the last set I'll have to make. Seeing into the dark interior of the hull can be a pain, more so the brighter it is outside. Mark got some red LEDs to light up the dash of his old pick-up (ute for my Assie friends) and gave me a left-over section. It requires a 12 volt supply (I'm running 6) and red doesn't really help in daylight, but I like the idea. If I can find a white LED strip that'll run on 6 volts, this will definitely get put in. The stern also had folding bulwarks like the bow, but that wrapped all the way around. On the real ship these were replace with a fixed bulwark except for a couple of panels that allowed access to the stern boat. By the time the ship came to Baltimore in 1955, these too were gone, with all their hardware. Again, I'm not making them functional, and decided to built these on the model rather than as separate pieces like on the bow. The hinges are represented inboard by card stock and brass eyes. The barrel portion of the hinges outboard at the bottom of each panel will be a little section of 1/16" wood dowel. The forward bulwarks were epoxied in place and the support rods were installed all around. The tops are raw because they all get a bright cap rail (varnished natural wood) and I'll put that on when it won't get messed up with paint or glue. A friend sent me a box of stuff, among which was a nive little cat face perfect for my catheads. Only having one, I was going to cast a pair in resin. But I'm out of casting resin and epoxy glue didn't set up in a way I liked, so we'll come back to that. The tops'l yards on the ship are hinged iron bands, line with wood staves. I wanted to replicate that functionality not only because that's what the ship has, but because it would allow me to take them off the mast without unrigging half the ship. I cut some heavy copper I use for everything and bent it into two half circles; soldiered brass tubing to the ends, and sawed out the notches with a jewelers saw. If only it had been that easy. Soldiering here tended to un-soldier there, cold soldier joints wouldn't hold. I gave up in frustration. I changed the gun carriages based on some research I did, but I'll post separate entries dealing with them and the ship's boats. I went looking for information on soldiering little things, and took another whack at the parrels. This time it worked out much better. I reused the copper band and brass tubing for the main and made the fore the same way. I still have to make the mizzen tops'l yard parrel, but my soldiering has gotten much much better. Last May ('17) I took the boat to the Baltimore Port Expo for National Maritime Day again, surrounded by members of our newly formed White Rocks Model Boat Club. I didn't manage to get her controls set-up in time, so she didn't go in the pool, but sat on her cart and looked pretty. I put her courses and trys'ls on her for this. The trys'ls won't be used when she sails, but can be set for static displays. The courses will get used, but I'll be able to buntl them up as shown to reduce sail. Also to reduce sail, the t'gallants and royals will be easily removable, or replaceable, as the case may be, depending on what wind there is. That pretty much brings us up to date as of July 2017. I'll post something about the boats and guns in a bit, as well as any other progress that's made. There's far more detail, images, and notes at my website on this, and the other models I'm working on at: http://todd.mainecav.org/model/ There's a few items I skimmed, or skipped over, like her signal flags, that are covered in detail there; like the day she was almost dismasted by the garage door.

No power by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
A final thought for tonight: at 19:21 (CET - Munich time, 18:21 UK time) you reported that the RX LED was lit and the ESC LEDs flashing. Was the rudder servo plugged in at that point?

No power by NickW Lieutenant   Posted: 7 months ago
Hi Doug Yes I did have the ESC and servo plugged in....now I can't even get the ESC or Rx to switch on...no LEDs at all now....think i'll buy a dolls house instead...much easier :-( i'm obviously missing/not doing something but i've tried all and every ways and nothing

No power by NickW Lieutenant   Posted: 7 months ago
Right Dave.....just done that, the Rx has green LED lit and the ESC started with flashing green'red LEDS....when I move the right hand stick to the right the green LED shows...when moved to the left the red LED shows....when stick returned to centre the red/green LEDS show again