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>> Home > Tags > mahogany

mahogany
mahogany
Decks by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Norm, Norm (!) Oughs drawing may well be 'as built'. During the war she received many mods. Depends on the time snapshot you want to recreate. I may be wrong about the island (photo perspective) but it seemed that way. I remember standing on the topmost island deck of a Colossus class carrier, at the foot of the antenna mast, looking down at ants crawling about on the deck, and the even smaller ones on the dockside! 😉 I was up there inspecting the COMMS antenna fit. That was my job the last 30 odd years. On existing ships I would survey the COMMS systems for upgrades and refits. For new build ships I would discuss the requirements and possibilities with the navies and then discuss with the shipyards how to achieve them! All good stuff, but the last 10 years I was getting a bit stiff for the climbing, so I sent a younger colleague up while I discussed the existing system and any problems with the crew in the Wardroom😉 Can't see your pic, the site only accepts jpgs etc🤔 An irritation that has often cost me time to do conversions 😡 We'll have to 'gang up' on Fireboat (Stephen) to get this improved. i often wanted to upload a pdf page, but had to convert to jpg etc first😭 Where is this mysterious platform? Maybe I can find it. A large searchlight would not surprise me. Could also be an early radar antenna, need to research the types mentioned above. If the launch has a cabin it may be an 'Admirals Barge', and Admirals had a lot of freedom to paint them how they wanted. So black and mahogany sounds very appropriate to me 👍 Often said on this site (and elsewhere) but: 'The only silly question is the one you don't ask'! Keep up the good work, Doug 😎

Decks by Gdaynorm Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi, I made the bridge to my drawing. I think it's right. I would think that Noram Ough had his basic dimensions correct. If not I might as well start over! In the pic I am attaching, there is a platform with what looks like a very large searchlight, but it is not clear enough to be sure, Seems a bit unlikely. I am giving her a 36 foot launch. I assume it would have been grey, though I am tempted to paint it black, with varnished wood cabin and mahogany foredeck. I am beginning to feel a bit stupid asking so many questions. I hope you don't feel 'oh no not him again!😡 Never had anyone to consult before. Most of the time here it's me helping others in our little club. You got around a lot of ships all over the world I think. What were you doing, or shouldn't I ask? Regards Norm

Dumas mahogany runabout by BobS Apprentice   Posted: 2 months ago
Does anyone out there have any experience with Chris Craft Kit #1230? It's 20 years old and I recently retired and decided to take this on. This is also my first attempt at something like this. Having trouble with some of the directions.

Phantom by Tica Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 28"/1000g Phantom Single Propellor (3 Blade 35mm) Direct Drive to a Turnigy D2836 1100kv (3 Blade) Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) 2Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through HK 30 A Boat ESC ESC - Comments: Bought it as partly build, and had to take it more or less apart to make it straight. Used a PU glue for the first set of planking, what a mess but it's strong. First trails on water showed that the balance was wrong so have to re-arrange the electronics. Unfortunately the trails also revealed that I had missed something with the sealing (my wife used the same materials for her Classic without any problems) so first of all I'll have to strip parts of the mahogany plating down and redo it :-( before I'll do any thing more on this model.

Just Keep Swimming by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
The maritime museum's event, scheduled for October instead of May, was cancelled as a hurricane blew up the coast and pushed water up the bay flooding a lot of coastal bay towns like St Michaels. I couldn't make the next Port Expo in 2016, but I tried to be ready for the maritime museum in October. I started making the forward bulwarks. The real ship had sections that folded down on bronze hinges a few of which still exist as she still had her forward bulwarks when she came to Baltimore. They could also be removed. I mad all the section as a single piece and I don't intend to make them functional, just something to snag and need to be repaired. As mentioned, the original winch drums warped and I made new ones with styrene drums instead of wood. These vanished around the time I moved and haven't been found yet, so I got some sheet plastic to take the place of the CDs and made a new pair. I have to say, I'm not happy with these at all. I did add a small block of Delrin to each winch to brace the drums against the pull of the braces/springs. Constellation's board at her entry port were carved. I took a photo of an original at the ship and traced it in PaintShopPro. Scaled it to the model and printed it. I glued this to some bass wood. I have some mahogany I can slice some thing slabs off of, and I may try using a rotary tool to carve a set for real, but till then, these will do. I tried to make the tops'l yard parrels which are iron hoops lined with wood. There's a pin for the yard's yoke to ride on, and the hoop can be opened and hinged to be removed. I wanted all that in case I need to remove a yard at some point without pulling down the whole rig. I tried it with some sheet brass, and again, I wasn't too hgappy with the result. We'll come back to that. So, I fiddled around with cutting combs to make hatch gratings, and actually managed to get something done, which led to making the main hatch cover. I had cut a bit of plywood as a cover, just to keep dust from going below while I was working - I based my hatch cover on this piece, framed the bottom; installed ledged for it to sit on inside the hatch coaming, and made gratings and fake beams on top. It's a bit simplified buy what the ship actually had, but it gets the point across. A couple of smaller gratings also got installed giving the deck a more finished appearance. I wasn't thrilled at bumping the bottom of a pool again, but the maritime museum is on the Miles River. I needed to be able to launch and retrieve the model at a boat-ramp or shore, so I started designing a launch-cart....

3D printing by Delboy Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
That's a fair comment but you could say the same about buying a pre-moulded hull or a kit. But, take it to its logical conclusion, do you fabricate your own plywood? Cultivate, and harvest your own balsa wood/bass wood/mahogany? Be a purist if that's what you want but is it right to sneer at others who find their own path to tread?

Gentlemans Cruiser by muddy Captain   Posted: 3 months ago
Hello, Fitted the combing, the deck , and started the Fore Planking, this time with Mahogany planks (5mm x 1.5mm ) and white wood caulking (0.5mm) mounted vertically. Adding some colour to the motor mounts, and drive chain, makes it easier when final assembly takes place as in electrical wiring. Regards Muddy....

Shelduck by muddy Captain   Posted: 4 months ago
Installing the Radio gear. Planking the Deck in 6mm x 2mm and .5mm Mahogany vertically used as "Caulking". A lot of brass pins.. !... Lead Keel, about 10lb; in weight. It was supposed to be "Let into" the keel, but a lot of extra work, decided to screw it to the bottom, hoping this would give it more stability having a deeper keel. Regards Muddy ....

Čolek / RIVA junior by Inkoust Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Hi, very beautiful work. I never would have believed that he would have made such a beautiful mahogany boat out of Cologne. I remember this as a kit from Igri. Really beautiful.👍👍👍

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by John Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
I have spoken to the person who built the boat. It is based on a Vintage model boat company design. It was scratch built and is made of strips of mahogany as I originally suspected. Having looked at the Vintage model company site it most resembles a sea hornet, however another kit may have been available at the time it was made. The strips of Mahogany were the builder making use of the materials they had to hand at the time, hence the vertical strips! The interior is covered in fine fibreglass mesh and 3 thin coats of fibreglass resin. Work on the restoration continues!

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi John Having looked closely at your hull construction and joints it would appear that over time the joints have failed. I have a Mercantic with exactly the same problem. If you can sand the raised joints flat then there is a method we use on our mahogany planked schooners that provided a water tight seal and produces a very high shine finish of great strength and resilience. We use G4 pond sealer which is a polyeurethane paint available from Garden Centres. ABL Stevens are my local supplier http://www.resin-supplies.co.uk/sealants.htm Its a one-pack polyurethane varnish hardened by moisture in the atmosphere or from the material being sealed, used as a sealant for timber or a barrier coat for concrete, preventing resin being attacked by moisture or alkali's. It's brush painted, touch dry in a couple of hours, dried in 24 hrs and is fully hardened in one week. We usually apply one coat then after 24 hrs wet and dry any blemishes and apply a final thin coat. We also coat the inside of the hull. If your hull has thinned in places then you could use tissue or thin glass cloth inside the hull to give added strength as others have suggested. Hope you manage to get the result you require. Dave

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by HoweGY177 Lieutenant   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi John, Suggest you sand as this will flatten the planking, no doubt each plank has curved slightly as the wood had dried out. Hoover out all the dust from the cracks and fill with a mahogany filler and re-flatten. The inside of the hull will also need varnishing to stop the wood drying out again. Would not advise wetting the planking to raise the grain as is normal practice as this might swell the wood and loose the filler. First use a good quality polyurathene varnish, brushed on but avoid runs, lightly sand to give a key before recoating. At this stage do not worry about the brush strokes showing. After at least 8 coats use wet and dry paper to sand the surface flat. Now apply a yacht varnish that does not dry so quickly and brush strokes will on the whole disappear. I suggest at least 3 coats to finish lightly wet and dry between coats. The more coats you give the deeper the shine. Use a good quality brush, a cheap brush drops hairs and does not give a smooth finish. If you look at my harbour and look at 'River Dance' you will see the finish this method can achieve. Good luck and hopes this helps. Vic

Scale Sailing Association by Westquay Captain   Posted: 5 months ago
Now I'll tell you what's really satisfying....planing the edge of a plank till it just slides right along where it should and locks up in exactly the right place with a resounding thunk. Just had that with tomorrow's plank. I wish the damned glue would set quicker, then it would be later today's plank, but there's always something else to do. I also tried steaming a plank to get some twist in it at one end. I judged the curve to be more or less coffee tin, fired up the kettle and held the end of the plank in the spout. Even though it's one of those turny offy types, leaving the plank end in the still steaming spout until too hot to hold (gardening gloves useful) did the trick. The 1/8th" thick, inch wide Cuban Mahogany went like chewing gum and took on the curvature of the coffee tin till cold, at which point it was glued straight in. Shed locked so I can't fiddle with it (I am a terrible poker of things not yet ready to be poked). The great epoxy event beckons ever closer. Martin

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by Westquay Captain   Posted: 5 months ago
Can't really add much to what Doug has said as he's covered the ground pretty well. I don't ever use paint stripper these days. I once used it to remove factory paint from a Matchbox toy when I was making a series of "Code 3" modified steam lorries. Very oddly the paint strippered ones refused to dry when sprayed with cellulose paint (yes, it was available then no probs.) If I sprayed over the factory paint it dried in minutes as cellulose will do. I hadn't had the problem before, but I certainly got it this time and I haven't wanted to use it since. On wood anyway, I wouldn't use anything liquid as it could always soak in and do who knows what damage. I would scrape the finish on your wood , but make sure you have read up on how to sharpen a cabinet scraper. The shiny ones are pigs to sharpen because they are stainless and you cannot get an edge on stainless. The best knives are NT stainless. As an ex clay modeller for the car industry, I can assure you that all slicks, which we called the thin flat scrapers, were spring steel. They had a nice gun blue finish, but would go rusty if you didn't look after them between contracts. Because you really need two hands to properly control a scraper you'll need to find a good way to hold the boat, but a sweet little job like that Sea Hornet will sit twixt your knees. Because you have all those fractures in a vertical way along the grain, keep your scraper in a diagonal way or it will pick up wood grain and damage the model. It may work if you work down the grain, perpendicular to the deck, so you are crossing the fissures in the varnish. I would suggest that if you want a varnish finish you will need to go over the wood with epoxy and possibly a light weight (1oz.) glass cloth. This will stop any tendency to split again. Surprisingly it does allow the grain to show still and after you have flattened the epoxy, you can then apply 2 or 3 coats, rubbed down in between as Doug says with a very fine paper, of a spar varnish. I have a no name tin which I am using on general stuff, from garden items to the spars of my "Vanity" model. When I did a model of a Rive Aquarama Special, I used an International Spar Varnish which has a slightly golden tinge. Now, the hard part. No boat I can ever think of had wood in a vertical lay on the hull. Ecen double or Riva's triple layer was diagonal, finishing with incredibly well selected horizontal layers. The Sea Hornet would be improved no end, I am sure with a layer of horizontal nature. What passes for mahogany these days is horrible stuff (and I would say that on your boat could even be teak, which should never be varnished), so I always used Steamed pear veneer, which has no figure and a very close grain. Sanding sealer, then stain with you idea of mahogany(from an orangey colour to a rich reddy brown), then spar varnish. DO NOT stain the wood/veneer, always stain the first coats of finish. Riva do that too! I want to know what makes you say the mahogany is the only stuff on the hull. The Sea Hornet has 1/16th" ply skins like all Aerokits, so why not yours? Personally, I think it would look best if you painted the hull and spent your efforts on doing a nice laid deck in Pear veneer and caulking. A gloss black hull and a laid, varnished deck look very tasty, like a Greavette gent's Racer. Pic attached. Cheers, Martin https://model-boats.com/media/np/s/200/1494407879

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by John Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Congratulation Captain Doug! I must admit I have not really noticed the ranking (and don’t ask me how it works because I have no idea 😁). I am not a wood expert but I think it is mahogany. It is an unusual construction but it looks very nice when it has an even coat of varnish. I also enjoy this site and I have learned a lot reading the posts. John.