Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
August 2018: 3 people
July 2018: 8 people
June 2018: 8 people
May 2018: 7 people
April 2018: 24 people
March 2018: 13 people
February 2018: 8 people
January 2018: 25 people
December 2017: 4 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (12)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > mahogany

mahogany
mahogany
Aft cockpit deck by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
I first cut the base material to size allowing a card thickness all round for final clearances. The lower deck has a number of features in it that need to be measured. I took dimensions from the plans and marked out the base. Again following the upper deck which has a mahogany boarder I cut and planed a further amount of 6mm x 1.5 strips of material. I started by outlining the mahogany boarders, Some years ago I made a mitring device for picture framing which has come in very handy for doing the corners. Having all the pieces cut they are then glued and temporally pinned in position until set. The next job is to prepare all the edges with black card and then measuring each plank across the width starting from the centre line. I must take into account how the planks sit against main access hatch and the battery hatch opening however, all seems to look good but until each plank is positioned and glued with its caulk divider it’s difficult to tell. When preparing each plank I first cut each piece oversize with wire cutters then using the disc sander I trim square one end, then place in position and mark for final length and finish again on the disc sander giving each plank a nice push fit Because lime planking varies in colour across a batch I numbered each plank across the deck varying the pattern of colours as I cut each to length. Next I cut a number of card pieces to length and start to glue (using Aliphatic glue), plank, followed by card filler across the half width, then repeat the other side. Finally the battery hatch and main access hatch are treated in the same manner. Next comes the finishing , I use a very fine grade on my belt sander (I attach a block on the underside of the main access deck to control the sanding process) to remove the majority of excess irregularities followed by an orbital sander for a fine finish. If there is any staining by the black card residue I simply remove it with a pencil rubber. Next I put the nail holes in again using the jig I made to ensure uniform spacing and then gave a coat of sanding sealer. Final finishing will be done as a complete assembly. Preparation of the side panels is the next process before final assembly

Cabin/Superstructure by muddy Admiral   Posted: 11 days ago
Upperworks, this launch has a long cabin and a well deck ( Gin Parlour ).. Sides were traced out and cut from 1.5mm ply, internal formers are 3mm ply, spacers and struts Obechie, the cabin front is formed with Balsa which will be covered in 1.5mm ply, all the external faces have been veneered in Mahogany, except the roof which will be probable a piece of ply. The old favourite 1 inch ring saw came into play again for the cutting out of the windows. Applied the veneer after cutting out the windows, have found this easier and it tends not to split and crack the veneer, so one has to recut the window openings but its a very quick and easy job if you use a 1/2 inch drum sander in something like a Dremel hobby type drill. I,m afraid we have the oposite of Rain stopped play , its Sun stopped play at the moment.. You may notice the "Old Batteries" and cans, used as weights to hold down / compress the veneer, also the Jig saw, bolted to a piece of ply and then clamped into the B&D Workmate, I aint got room for a bandsaw which i would love, so this lash up has done me proud for a few years. Regards Muddy....

Another useful site for all 'Woodies' ;) by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Haha, somebody's been on the hunt. Got all those mate and an awful lot more besides, such as this beauty, which I simply HAVE to have a bash at. HornetII, mahogany hull, aluminium deck and fin. Gotta love that Scripps twin plug V12. Martin

Fairly Hunsman renovation part 1 by CB90 Admiral   Posted: 12 days ago
I was lucky to be able to get myself a fibre glass hulled Fairly Huntsman 31 this is a model of the 31 ft Huntsman which converts to a scale of 1:11 which is a bit of a strange scale, the superstructure is in a poor state, so I am thinking it could now be changed to a 'Fairly Huntsman 28' which I think looks better. Huntsman 28 The model 34 in long is close to 1:10scale at 34.6in Some History Four Huntsman 28's took part and competed in the 1969 Daily Telegraph / B.P. Round Britain powerboat race. A Huntsman 28 'Fordspeed No 909' entered and completed the London - Monte Carlo race in 1972. Also the same boat set a new class speed record of 51.271 mph on Lake Windemere, in October 1973. The hull is a deep V with single chine and spray rails. The construction was of laminated mahogany, the hulls were cooked in an oven to cure the glue. The twin engines were placed mid ships. Dimensions LOA: 28' 10" (8.8m) LWL: ~24' 10" (~7.6m) Beam: 8' 9" (2.66m) Draught: 2' 6" (0.76m) Displacement: 8160lbs (3710kg)

So, why not woodies?... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
Hi all, a coffee break question for you all. You will know me if you know me at all as a lover of the woodie, the mahogany hotrod, the classic speedboat. And I wonder why they are so very rarely modelled. There are plenty of plans for them and a few kits which can be made straight or converted into others. They are well documented on the 'net. There are some wonderful books about them (most of which I have!). Yet where are they all? Surely they are more fun to fling round a pond than some old tanker/coaster. I realise tugs can be made to erm...tug, if the rest of the equipment is available, but it rarely seems to be. Does the glamour of a highly varnished wooden or painted finish with chrome fittings not appeal? Does the average smallness of the classic speedboat not make for easy transport? Not a criticism, just a ponder, but some response would be appreciated. Cheers, Martin

The Saga of the Cabin Roof or - Arrrgh! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
Did you mean me John? Or Mike? I had considered planking but my mahogany planks are very very thin about 0.5mm x 5mm wide, and I would still have had the problem of 'warping on' a plywood base skin. So I persevered with the mahogany veneer and I'm happy now with the result of making it in two pieces. matching the edges for the centre line joint took the most time 🤔 More power to your plank cutters Gents👍

Adele by Mikep Lieutenant   Posted: 16 days ago
[Score: 8/10] 36"/6400g Adele Capable of 12mph and a runtime of 30mins Twin Propellors (2 Blade S Type 40mm) Direct Drive to a MACK 5045 (2 Blade S Type) Powered by NiMH (14.4v) 5Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through MACK 35 (35Amps) ESC - Comments: Model is from Dumas kit hull covered with 2 layers or 2 oz. fiberglass cloth and resin. Deck mahogany covered with 3/4 oz. cloth and resin, painted with klass Coat epoxy paints. Running lights and cabin light. Built with removable interchangeable bridge windscreen or windscreen with roof.

Making and Fitting tinted windows by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 days ago
This was actually done back in April, somehow it ended up in another thread and I forgot to put it here!🤓 After spraying the cabin white I used the windows 'oles to mark templates for the windows. Which I then transferred to 3mm tinted perspex / acrylglass and cut out on the table scroll saw. Despite careful marking and cutting still had to fiddle about with filing to get 'em to fit right 😡 Pics 1 to 3 show fitted windows still with protective film. Pics 4 to 6 film removed but still to be polished. 7th pic; Les pièces, 8th pic; ze glue 😉 I chose 3mm 'glass' a) to match the 3mm ply of the cabin walls - makes it easier to get a flush fit, b) could get it in green tint 😊 Think there was also grey and red !!!! Red for a 'Fun' Boat perhaps 😲 Glue used; Deluxe Materials Canopy Glue; "Thick, flexible glue. High grip. Dries clear. Fills gaps." Here endeth the advert😉 Last pic shows final result after polishing. Maybe sometime, when I haven't got more interesting things to solve and build, I'll make some alu or mahogany frames! 😉 Happy glazing folks😁 Cheers, Doug 😎

Part1 research information by CB90 Admiral   Posted: 16 days ago
Deck From the construction hand book:- Decking shall be single layer of mahogany plywood, approximately 9/16 inch thick, installed in general accordance with plan, BuShips No. PT486-S1106-411193, subject to development of satisfactory material. Note. I have seen photos of some perhaps later ELCO 80s with planked decks. Planking 62 degrees hull planking angle not 45 degrees as many have used. stern transom at 12 degree angle approximately. Prop shafts of real boat. All three propellers turned in the same direction clockwise looking from rear, not the greatest configuration for a model boat. propshaft angles are around 10 degrees. The centre shaft is at a larger angle to the side ones. The centre prop shaft angle is 11 degrees and the wing prop shafts are 9 degrees. Using these angles may restrict your propeller selection. The centre shaft appears from hull further aft than the side shafts but the propellers are all at the same distance from the stern or transom.

Dumas Express Crusier by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 17 days ago
Very nice tidy job Mike 👍👍👍 Lovely finish. Like the mahogany transom, might do that with my Sea Scout! Crew ain't bad either 😉 Cheers, Doug 😎

Wianno Senior progressing by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
https://m.facebook.com/wiannosr/ Had to change hull to red after some bondo work. Deck is painted, just some touch up and glossy polyurethane for the mahogany. It is coming along.

Inspiration for beautiful boat builders ;-) by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Not enough woodies in the model boat world. Just loads of kit built Dumas Chris Crafts and Amati Rivas with the Timossi Hydro (NOT Ferrari) thrown in. When you consider how many gorgeous woodies of every kind there are and have been that seems to say loud and clear that people won't/can't/don't make anything from scratch any more. Many woodies could be made by adapting the kits made by various companies or the plans sets sold by the Rowell family. Ditchburn, Minet-Shields, Peterborough, Hackercraft, Dodge, Chris Craft, Greavette, Gar Wood, Lyman, Century, Seabird, Richardson.....gentleman's racers, racers, runabouts, sedans, commuters, utilities. So many gorgeous chrome detailed varnished mahogany hot rods, yet so few are ever modelled. I have dozens of plans, so they are available. Very strange. Martin

Rear Deck assembly –(upper tow deck) by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
I propose to make the rear deck and the deck which carries the tow hook all as a complete piece that lifts out in one. Although its going to be in one piece the full assembly still has to be made as separate components so first job is to cut the individual panels again using the card inserts to make sure the end assembly has clearance. The tow hook deck is the first piece to be dealt with and epoxied as a sub assembly. Having completed the wooden frame I then took a break and did some more planking, first a mahogany boarder and then glue a black card calk around its inside edge, next cut and sand each plank to fit in the space left, these could then be glued in place with a black card calk between each plank. After a period of drying I sanded the whole surface level. Next I put the nail holes in again using the jig I made to ensure uniform spacing and then gave a coat of sanding sealer. When the rest of the subassemblies are complete they will all be lacquered together before final assembly.

A tall ship and a wheel to steer her with by Jerry Todd Captain   Posted: 1 month ago
Making a ship's wheel, specifically the turned spokes of a ship's wheel, and 20 of them all a-like, has been beyond me. So I gave up and got Model Monkey on Shapeways to scale his Constitution wheel up to 1:36 scale, and got 4 of them; 2 for Constellation, and 2 for Macedonian. The helm is made of mahogany. The curves braces laminated from some strips from an old kit; the uprights from some scrap left from a musical instrument build. The drum is some mahogany dowel, from a kit again, and a brass rod axle. Some paint and clear-coat and it's just about done. I was going to make it operate when the rudder servo moved, but a spoke handle fell off while painting, and I figure it's a bit fragile to be spinning at "non-scale" speeds, so it'll just get some line wrapped around the drum for show.

Windows, stoopid question. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Thanks Martin, was time consuming and fiddly but; If a job's worth doing .... Good idea with the styrene, got lots o that as well in various grades. Will watch with interest how yours turn out👍 I had wondered though what polished alu would look like; either 'reet neece' 😉 or cheapo 🤔! May in the end still go for mahogany, more fiddly but I like a challenge 😊 Still looking for suitable crew for 'Jessica'. Cheers, Doug 😎 BTW: you could always spray all the frames in one swoosh before you fit the glass 😉