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>> Home > Tags > matt finish

matt finish
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Wherry hull in GRP by BOATSHED Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Hi mastman, I saw your comment that you wrote, I have copied and pasted it below. ******************************************** Your right about the madhouse cant see how people can run things down on here without seeing the actual goods any way thats another matter. ********************************************* I did write about the shape of the wherry hull was wrong. I am not into sailing boats, am more into MTB's and I power boat hulls. I know I hadn't seen the actual hull in the flesh so to speak. All I saw was the picture that had been posted for the Wherry hull that was for sale. I had just come home from Norfolk and just seen a Wherry moored in Potter Heigham. I commented that the shape was wrong because of the way the bow of the hull swept up so high. I have posted the picture I saw from which I commented on. I am sorry if I did offend you but it was just that I din't see the shape as being correct. Once again I am sorry to have offended you. I also said about other parts being made on a 3D printer. Onc e again I did think that resin ones I have seen on ebay were of a better finish quality than the 3D printed ones. It seems that I have put a cat amongst the pigeons with my remarks. I am sorry to have offended you. Regards BOATSHED.

Final Color Choice! by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
I was going to use a very light green. By Humbrol but decided against it because. I thought about it Tugs of that class and era. Where a dark green! But I don't want to use dark green! So, I purchased medium light green instead. It's called "Army Green"! Oh, It has no shine what so ever. A very matt finish which is what I want! If you look at the picture to the right. That's the original Brooklyn. Docked somewhere on a New York City pier. Circa 1910!

Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Your boat is beginning to look suspiciously 'Museum Standard'!👍 Yep, shame about Kingston, but can understand why Robin didn't want to build for Frank's kits anymore (or anyone else's for that matter) wouldn't fit in with his No Hectic policy! Re 'tin bashing! Here's a couple of examples of my last attempts from several years ago, from my H Class 1936 destroyer, scale 1/72. I note that they need the years of neglect cleaning off 🤔 I'll pass it off as North Atlantic Convoy duty muck😁 First two pics 20mm Oerlikons, made from 0.5mm brass sheet, 1mm copper for the carriage frames and 1 and 2mm brass tube. Guns can elevate 😉 Recoil 'springs' are shrink sleeve, but I now have some suitable real springs. Will try to finish them off when Hotspur comes up for refit completion. Pic 3 is one of the depth charge throwers port side. Core is a 1/4" wood dowel, the rest is 0.5mm brass, tinned copper wire and 2mm brass tube for the firing cylinder. I used John Lambert (RIP) plans for both. Pic 4, the thrower on deck and copper wire ladder rails, crewman shanghaied from Monty's 1/72 Airfix 8th Army. A Desert Rat on board! Under the black square is the hole for the aft torpedo mount. Underneath is the speaker for the "Whoop Whoop". That part of the 'deck' is just painted aircraft silk! Must get back into practise now I've got nowt more important to do 😁 Cheers Doug 😎

Main deck and cabin walls by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Sorry the advertised Flash Gordon reel has gone 'walkies' so you'll have to make do with this boring description of how to occupy a day or three and stink out the house!😁 After the eventual success with the cabin roof I continued with the main deck using essentially the same process. First I had to extend the planking (engraving) from cabin leading edge back to the transom. Dad had only done the foredeck. Pic 1 shows starting point. AKA Square One! Pic 2 after initial staining, pseudo planking and sealing. Plank engraving was done with a fine hardened steel scriber / centre punch and a steel rule clamped at 7mm centres. Rule was aligned so that the wood grain pushed the scriber against it. Don't ask how I realised that that was the way to do it (minor Arrrgh!)😡 Anyway, worked out in the end. I had started with cherry wood stain but it came out too bright red so from Krick I obtained some Jotica mahogany stain (also some Oak stain for the decks of my Prince of Wales and Bismarck - but that's another pair of Sagas to be.) Using basically the same process as for the cabin roof: two sealing coats, two matt varnish primer coats, two gloss varnish coats, two protective lacquer coats, polishing with cutting polish and top gloss polish, and lots of patience and elbow grease (this time an Italian Lugana😉) pics 3 to 5 show the result. I'm 'appy with that 😊 Note: to remove build up of sanding residue from the 'planking caulking' I had to resort to an old toothbrush or nail-brush from time to time. The sponge couldn't hack it. The aft deck 'hatch' is still the temporary bodge-up I made 25 years ago to quickly get the boat going for my daughter. Think the ply (ca 4mm) came from the back of an old bureaux! Haven't decided yet whether to make the new one from the same mahogany as the roof or thin ply and stain like the main deck. Suggestions welcome please. After the deck time to turn my attention to the cabin walls, looking pretty shabby and full of over-spray - pic 6 😲 Step 0: masking off, pics 7 & 8 'All Dressed Up and Nowhere To Go'🤔 Step 1: mucho sanding starting with 180 grit and working through to 600 ensuring removal of all traces of blue as I wanted the final finish to be Arctic White (not Ice Blue!) Step 2: two sealing coats, flattening with 600 grit. Step 3: spraying with Revell white primer, not impressed, gave a rough dusty finish🤔 Step 4: sand off Revell muck, flat back with 1000 and 1500 grit sponges, respray with two coats of pro white primer, flattening with 1500 and 2000+ soap respectively. Much better 😊 like the proverbial baby's ...! Step 5: two coats of gloss white, same make as the primer!!!, flattening with 3000 grit sponge, wet + a drop of liquid soap. Step 6: two coats of protective lacquer as with the varnish. Flattening with 3000 and soap between coats only. Interesting effect with this lacquer and the paint (as opposed to the varnish); it seemed to 'melt and fuse' with the paint surface and smooth it out.😊 Just had to be careful not to apply too much at once in case it all ran down and took the paint with it! Step 7: finishing with cutting polish and anti-hologram polish. Results: pics 9 - 11. Final effect makes it look and feel like plastic or fibreglass, almost forgot that there is wood underneath😁 Next in this theatre "Hi Ho Silver Awaaaayyyy!" (Sponsored by KiOra!) or 'I'm gonna finish this hull if it kills me!' (sorry Flash reels got lost in the post😡) Cheers Doug 😎

The Saga of the Cabin Roof or - Arrrgh! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Typical of Aeorokits the cabin roof skin was made of two thin pieces of ply < 1mm. Over the 50 years or so the overhang corners had started to curl up and crack 😲 Pics 1 & 2 show the 'off the shelf' condition after 25 years of neglect 🤔. First I tried to correct this by soaking in hot water and flattening under a car battery (flattens most things😉). So far so good. Then some super glue in the cracks and back under the battery. After a day or two it just curled up again. Ho hum! Pour a glass of wine and back to the thinking board. Seconds Out - Round Two! Thought, OK make new pieces from the 0.6mm ply I still have and paint it - then my eye fell on some 1mm mahogany sheet (Ouch 😭). Tried to make the whole roof skin in one piece of this but the compound curve defeated me. The skin was steamed and soaked in hot water and clamped across the roof frame. Next morning - Arrrgh! Had started to crack along the centre line 😭 More thinks!! Carefully cut down the middle and glued and clamped the separate pieces; pics 3&4. Getting the two pieces to match in the middle was a tedious ***!!! Pic 5. Then mucho sanding. followed by 2 coats of Lord Nelson sealer, sand back with 600 grit sanding sponge. Then two coats of Lord Nelson matt varnish, sanding with 1000 grit in between. then two coats of Lord Nelson gloss varnish, sanding with 2000 grit in between. Pic 6. So far so good, pic 6. 3rd coat of varnish and - Arrrgh 2! 😡 Pic 7. No idea why! Sand off and start again, pic 8 😭 Treated each side separately, pics 9 & 10 and flatted off with 2000 grit. Then applied three coats of clear protective lacquer, sanding with 3000 grit between coats. Finally cutting back with auto paint restorer / cutting polish and finally polishing with anti-hologram finishing polish. Pic 11. Now I'm happy 😊 Pic 12. Only took a week 😉 Next week in this theatre - "I love you too Flash but we've only got 15 minutes to save the world"! or 'Will I ever get this hull finished?" 😎

Port lights in place! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hmm! I see where you're coming from Ed, but bear in mind that matt paints have a habit of developing shiny spots wherever they are touched! 🤔 Wear and tear,servicing and cleaning etc. I would use the satin (semi-matt) paint and finish off with matt clear varnish for protection, also UV protection! 👍 I use the Lord Nelson varnish for that. http://www.krickshop.de/Products/Paints-Accessories/Paints-f... Cheers Doug 😎 PS Sorry to hear about the glue 🤔 Oh well! There's always Sellotape 😉 Or as Grandad used to say "If all else fails - use bl***y great nails" 😉

Spraying/hand painting by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
The Upol Barcote product recommended is intended for Industrial use mainly in car restoration. The spec sheet can be seen at http://www.u-pol.com/files/6689/up0720-SDS-EN. If you are intending to use this Full PPE equipment should be worn and only use in a well ventilated area. Personally I use paintstrippers, scapers and a hot air paint stripper to clean wooden hulls back to bare wood. This allows me to see any damage caused by fuels used with IC engines. I agree its messy, takes time and is best done outside, but you do end up with a solid hull with no hidden soft spots. I agree with Jarvo's use of Clear Cote either in gloss or semi matt finish. If the air temp is much below 20 deg most rattle cans will not give a good finish and runs will be difficult to avoid.

Spraying/hand painting by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi Boaty, the basic answer is preparation, matted down, smooth surface and clean, dust free. No shortcuts, hours of sanding and degreasing gives the pro finish. Mark

Spraying/hand painting by Peter581 Petty Officer   Posted: 5 months ago
Perhaps you have answered the question your self, wet and dry and after a couple of coats you should find it smooth and without blemish. This is the time to ensure there is no dust around. A good idea is to try and make a shelter around the boat and wet it before giving it the final cost of a good quality gloss paint. It really is just a matter of perseverance and you should have a great finish. Good luck! Peter581

TRIUMPH (CG-52301) USCG Type F MLB by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Laser cut kit from Barracuda RC Boats, N Carolina, USA. Baltic birch plywood false keel, ribs/frames, hull sheathing, deck and cabins. No formal plans; I was able to source a handful of B&W archival photos from the USCG website. Fortunately I was able to procure a motherload of archival photos and a few hard to read layout drawings from Mr. Timothy Dring, LCDR, USN (Ret.). He is co-author of "American Coastal Rescue Craft", which is the "bible" if you will, of such. I do sometimes thank the internet. I am certain that without his assistance, my efforts on this wouldn't have been as enjoyable. The kit was also void of fittings, which I was aware of prior to purchase, so I invested in a 3D printer. That I've used to a limited degree, due to searching for parts in the correct file format is mind-numbing! I have globally sourced fittings; USA, UK, ASIA. As a matter of fact, the searchlights I got from this Model Boat Shop were 3D printed, and I was able to fit 5mm LEDs into them. I'd like to get a couple more and put some superbright 12v LED drone lamps in them for use on my 35" towboat. Many deck fittings are handmade when possible, the cleats and fairleads are from Cornwall Boats, UK. (Very reasonable & diverse source, if you didn't already know.) I try to keep wood natural when detail allows it, as I never have enjoyed painting over natural grain. Her decks are covered with 1/16" scribed basswood sheathing from earthandtree.com, which is normally used for wainscoting dollhouse walls. All my boats that have wood decks are covered with scribed sheathing; I feel it makes 'em look "sexy". Believe it or not, the idea for wainscoting came from finding 3/16" at Hobby Lobby's dollhouse department. A couple of feet x 3.5" was about $16, so I found a less expensive source that also had more selections (earthandtree.com) The rail stanchions are 3/16" square dowels with 2 corners rounded over on the Dremel router table. Leaving their base square, I fit a square peg into a round hole with no glue to facilitate removal, and also for ease of replacing broken ones, which is inevitable. The rail is 1/16" brass rod that also is readily removable. The stern rail is stationary on the lower half, and the chain & wire stanchions are removable for towing ops. The deck coamings and knuckle are African mahogany strips, other mahogany accents came from leftovers of a prior build. I also try on all my boats, to incorporate vintage leftover scribed sheathing salvaged from my late Father's builds, so I know he's got a part in my builds. Note-the raised deck section between the aft ladder trunk and towing bit is actually a laminated deckhouse he made for the Frigate Essex. Unfortunately, he was unable to build that kit due to Alzheimer's disease in his latter years. (I blame that mostly on the hazardous fumes from the airplane "dope" & glue he used when building RC planes in the 60s & 70s.) I use polyurethane instead of resin due to COPD, 37 yrs of smoking, I quit 2.5 yrs ago. The driveline consists of: 775 Johnson DC main (3500 RPM@12V), Harbor Models 4mm x 14" shaft w/brass stuffing box, Raboesch 75mm 5-blade brass wheel (not OEM), 5mm U-joint couplers, Dimart 320A fan-cooled ESC. Handmade wooden teardrop rudder on a 3/8" sternpost, 1/4" tiller arm steered by a Halcion sail winch servo and cable system. Flysky 6 channel. The nav lights and other illumination are Lighthouse 9v LEDs, also a GoolRC Receiver controlled flashing blue Law Enforcement light. Obviously, I put the cart before the horse and completed the topsides and below deck before finishing the outer hull, but the Wx and season change dictated such. Can't wait for Spring!

Propulsion Hegi Revell Fairplay V tug model by Radiosailor Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 8 months ago
Hi AllenA, LOL! I think you're referring to my post "Local Boatshow" in the Boat Harbour section. Doesn't matter. Happy to read that I'm perfectly fine! I'm just new here and have no idea how active this forum is. I happened to stumble over this forum while searching RC boat photo's on the web, and thought: Well why not drop a question here. (not knowing at that time that I would spend half the afternoon posting pics of my own fleet...and I haven't even finished yet...) Back on topic: I'm curious to see what advise I get over here regarding the Fairplay V. I might even keep up a build blog over here. I like the classic - almost yacht like - sheerline and superstructure. And this model is compared to the Banckert, Bugsier, Kalle or Torben tugs slightly wider and heavier; which will give this tug just a bit bigger wavepattern...

Painted steelwork by Ballast Captain   Posted: 9 months ago
Steel (Brass) all painted now in matt black will follow up with Satin Cote so not to have too glossy finish !

Decks by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 months ago
Hi Norm, All the weapons, boats and other 'hangers-on decks' are Humbrol colour Matt Sea Grey # 27, Revel approximate Matt Mouse Grey (Mausgrau) # 47. Don't know what paint type you use but I have several conversion charts so let me know and I'll see if I can find an equivalent. Flight deck is Matt U.S. Light (!) Green # 117, which is actually not so light, more of a Sea Grey-green. Arrester wires: On the Ark there are 8 ! According to my plan- #1 33.5m from the edge of the roll down, #2 6.6m from #1 #3 6.6m from #2 #4 7.33m from #3 #5 7.33m from #4 #6 6.95m from #5 #7 5.64 from #6 #8 5.26 from #7 No guarantee for accuracy!! Or even if 'Lusty' was the same but it's an indication. 😉 Your build is looking good 👍 I'm wondering if you are taking all this trouble why don't you go the 'whole hog' and bring her to life😉 Finish the hull and give her some motors 😊 No, I'm not in UK, I'm in Munich where I've been for the last 32 years, Tempus fugit😲, hence my forum name 😉 Cheers Doug 😎

water, paint, copper by Jerry Todd Captain   Posted: 12 months ago
The gun deck isn't modeled. I was building a model intended to sail in open water and didn't want to deal with open gun ports, hatches, etc. After glassing the hull, she got beams for the spar deck installed. 3/4" x 3/4", they're probably a bit more than was needed. Tubes were installed for 5/16" stainless threaded rods that would hold her external ballast on. The forward one will be disguised as her galley stovepipe, the aft one is hidden under the cabin skylight. The ballast is a 2" i.d. PVC pipe about 4 feet long, filled with lead bird-shot, and weighing some 42 pounds. With that much done, I took her to the creek to see her float, but I forgot the rods. A few days later I took her out again, remembering the rods, and put her lower masts in her. Now baptized, I applied the moldings and trim on her stern, and built up her enclosed head. Her gunport were molded in resin in the closed position with the guns clamped in the openings and a tampion in the muzzles. These were epoxied into gunports cut from the outer layer of glass and wood battens, leaving the matting in place as a backer. Then she got some paint, mainly because I was getting tired of her looking like a barkless log. The bottom was painted with copper paint, but three rolls of 1/2" wide peel-n-stick tape had just arrived and I started into coppering her bottom right off. Copper plates are nailed on with copper nails with counter-sunk heads through pre-punched holes in the copper sheets. The are FLAT with with a little hollow where they're driven in just beyond flush with the surface. They are NOT round headed nor look like rivets as so many models insist are doing. I pressed an impression of the nails into the face of each plate. Installing them pushes this dent back out and leaves a little circle that looks as it should. It took about a week to do one side, and I took a break to make the tops for the lower masts, then continued onto coppering the other side. It was bright and beautiful when finished, but it wouldn't stay that way. Copper doesn't turn green when submerged, any copper coin will show you it turns brown. I wanted her bottom to brown somewhat, but not too much, and I figured to let that happen naturally. When it got where I wanted it, I'd clear-coat it to lock it in. Two yards of Dupont Supplex cloth was ordered to make her sails. This is the stuff SC&H used on their square-rigger kits and it's great for making sails. Being a nylon, you cut it with a hot-knife, and use a pointed tip in a soldering iron to make grommets. I drew on the panel seams with a .03 marker as even the finest stitching is over scale even at 1:36. Top-cloths, corner reinforces, reef bands, etc, are all cut from the same cloth and glued on with fabric adhesive. The only sewing was of the bolt-ropes. These are done by hand much the way real ones are - I've sewn a few miles of real bolt ropes in my time. There's really no substitute for this if you want a functional scale appearing sail. A machine can't sew it properly, in the right position, or securely.

Er slight Problem by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
Hi When you started the build I saw that you had a good strong flat board and had supported the keel in several places. It looked as though it was all going well until you started to skin the hull with very heavy balsa(?). When applying skins the hull does need to be supported at all times and skins applied equally to both sides at the same time. Wood has a nasty habit of shrinking as it dries, and doing equal planking on both sides helps compensate. When we built the Titanic and Olympic the hulls were built upside down and remained on the build board until all planking was complete. We used 4mm balsa sheets. and covered inside and out with fibreglass matting and cloth. To use this method you need to extend each former so that the hull is level to the board with a gap at the bottom when you have finished. Couple of pics attached may help explain. Good luck with the rebuild Dave