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>> Home > Tags > matt finish

matt finish
aerosol finished
matt
matt finish
Propulsion Hegi Revell Fairplay V tug model by Radiosailor Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi AllenA, LOL! I think you're referring to my post "Local Boatshow" in the Boat Harbour section. Doesn't matter. Happy to read that I'm perfectly fine! I'm just new here and have no idea how active this forum is. I happened to stumble over this forum while searching RC boat photo's on the web, and thought: Well why not drop a question here. (not knowing at that time that I would spend half the afternoon posting pics of my own fleet...and I haven't even finished yet...) Back on topic: I'm curious to see what advise I get over here regarding the Fairplay V. I might even keep up a build blog over here. I like the classic - almost yacht like - sheerline and superstructure. And this model is compared to the Banckert, Bugsier, Kalle or Torben tugs slightly wider and heavier; which will give this tug just a bit bigger wavepattern...

Painted steelwork by Ballast Captain   Posted: 3 months ago
Steel (Brass) all painted now in matt black will follow up with Satin Cote so not to have too glossy finish !

Decks by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi Norm, All the weapons, boats and other 'hangers-on decks' are Humbrol colour Matt Sea Grey # 27, Revel approximate Matt Mouse Grey (Mausgrau) # 47. Don't know what paint type you use but I have several conversion charts so let me know and I'll see if I can find an equivalent. Flight deck is Matt U.S. Light (!) Green # 117, which is actually not so light, more of a Sea Grey-green. Arrester wires: On the Ark there are 8 ! According to my plan- #1 33.5m from the edge of the roll down, #2 6.6m from #1 #3 6.6m from #2 #4 7.33m from #3 #5 7.33m from #4 #6 6.95m from #5 #7 5.64 from #6 #8 5.26 from #7 No guarantee for accuracy!! Or even if 'Lusty' was the same but it's an indication. 😉 Your build is looking good 👍 I'm wondering if you are taking all this trouble why don't you go the 'whole hog' and bring her to life😉 Finish the hull and give her some motors 😊 No, I'm not in UK, I'm in Munich where I've been for the last 32 years, Tempus fugit😲, hence my forum name 😉 Cheers Doug 😎

water, paint, copper by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 6 months ago
The gun deck isn't modeled. I was building a model intended to sail in open water and didn't want to deal with open gun ports, hatches, etc. After glassing the hull, she got beams for the spar deck installed. 3/4" x 3/4", they're probably a bit more than was needed. Tubes were installed for 5/16" stainless threaded rods that would hold her external ballast on. The forward one will be disguised as her galley stovepipe, the aft one is hidden under the cabin skylight. The ballast is a 2" i.d. PVC pipe about 4 feet long, filled with lead bird-shot, and weighing some 42 pounds. With that much done, I took her to the creek to see her float, but I forgot the rods. A few days later I took her out again, remembering the rods, and put her lower masts in her. Now baptized, I applied the moldings and trim on her stern, and built up her enclosed head. Her gunport were molded in resin in the closed position with the guns clamped in the openings and a tampion in the muzzles. These were epoxied into gunports cut from the outer layer of glass and wood battens, leaving the matting in place as a backer. Then she got some paint, mainly because I was getting tired of her looking like a barkless log. The bottom was painted with copper paint, but three rolls of 1/2" wide peel-n-stick tape had just arrived and I started into coppering her bottom right off. Copper plates are nailed on with copper nails with counter-sunk heads through pre-punched holes in the copper sheets. The are FLAT with with a little hollow where they're driven in just beyond flush with the surface. They are NOT round headed nor look like rivets as so many models insist are doing. I pressed an impression of the nails into the face of each plate. Installing them pushes this dent back out and leaves a little circle that looks as it should. It took about a week to do one side, and I took a break to make the tops for the lower masts, then continued onto coppering the other side. It was bright and beautiful when finished, but it wouldn't stay that way. Copper doesn't turn green when submerged, any copper coin will show you it turns brown. I wanted her bottom to brown somewhat, but not too much, and I figured to let that happen naturally. When it got where I wanted it, I'd clear-coat it to lock it in. Two yards of Dupont Supplex cloth was ordered to make her sails. This is the stuff SC&H used on their square-rigger kits and it's great for making sails. Being a nylon, you cut it with a hot-knife, and use a pointed tip in a soldering iron to make grommets. I drew on the panel seams with a .03 marker as even the finest stitching is over scale even at 1:36. Top-cloths, corner reinforces, reef bands, etc, are all cut from the same cloth and glued on with fabric adhesive. The only sewing was of the bolt-ropes. These are done by hand much the way real ones are - I've sewn a few miles of real bolt ropes in my time. There's really no substitute for this if you want a functional scale appearing sail. A machine can't sew it properly, in the right position, or securely.

Er slight Problem by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Hi When you started the build I saw that you had a good strong flat board and had supported the keel in several places. It looked as though it was all going well until you started to skin the hull with very heavy balsa(?). When applying skins the hull does need to be supported at all times and skins applied equally to both sides at the same time. Wood has a nasty habit of shrinking as it dries, and doing equal planking on both sides helps compensate. When we built the Titanic and Olympic the hulls were built upside down and remained on the build board until all planking was complete. We used 4mm balsa sheets. and covered inside and out with fibreglass matting and cloth. To use this method you need to extend each former so that the hull is level to the board with a gap at the bottom when you have finished. Couple of pics attached may help explain. Good luck with the rebuild Dave

The Kent Clearview screen by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
There is a white metal ‘ring’ supplied in the kit for the Kent Clearview screen but it is too large and doesn’t look particularly ‘scale’. So after some research on the web and some help from other forum members I found enough information to make one from scratch. The outer ring was made from a narrow section of pvc pipe that I had to hand and this was cut to length in a mitre block and then sanded down to the right thickness on some abrasive paper and then sprayed matt black. I didn’t use the perspex screen supplied in the kit as the hole was too large but the small circular cut-out piece was the right diameter to fit into the ring that I made, the new screen was cut from a new piece of perspex sheet and a hole drilled through the centre to locate the rotating part of the screen. The parts were assembled onto the new screen using canopy glue applied very sparingly with a dressmaking pin. The motor drive assembly on the inside of the screen and the black triangular part that sits on the outside of the screen were made from some black plasticard and these parts were also fixed in place with canopy glue. I used a brass panel pin with the head filed down and painted black for the central bearing of the screen but when I applied a very small amount of canopy glue to fix it capillary action unexpectedly drew the glue between the two ‘panes’ of perspex 😡 Not what I wanted to happen but I decided to leave it to dry to it’s clear state and then assess the situation. Fortunately the glue is not too conspicuous to be much of a concern but it is nevertheless an unwanted blemish that I will have to accept 😭 The finished piece was then glued into the wheelhouse with a few dots of canopy glue and looks quite good as long as you don’t look too closely 😎

Finishing by Westquay Captain   Posted: 7 months ago
If you put a question out there, you'll get an answer. At least you will from me if I know about it and I know about paint. Why on earth do you say acrylic can be put over anything UNLIKE cellulose or enamel. Cellulose maybe, but enamel? You can put enamel over anything. I can even get cellulose over almost anything with my spray gun, but I know how to mist it on. I suggested enamel because it is so completely harmless. Cellulose, apart from mixed Halfords and Zero Paints is no longer available. Acrylic as you know can react even with itself. It doesn't have good pigments and doesn't cover well. Enamel does. I was well aware that the original post was from a new member, so I figured he deserved a straight answer. Not everyone wants a matt or even a satin finish on a model boat if it isn't a Warship or a service vessel. Would you put satin varnish on a Greavette or a Chris Craft, matt paint on a model of a luxury yacht of any age? Of course not. This nonsense about scale effect is just that....nonsense. A shine's a shine whether smaller or larger, otherwise where do you stop? Martin

What size planking for crash tender decks? by Westquay Captain   Posted: 8 months ago
Hi, very surprised you haven't had a reply on this topic. I'm only just going through topics and you've probably finished it by now! I would use lime (basswood) and as deck panks are usually about 3 ins. I would get some 1/4" wide in 1/12th scale lime and use black card or ebonised wood veneer (black stuff) for the caulking. About a milimetre thick is enough for the deck planks. Then I would give it a matt finish with (as Colin has just advised me) a coat or two of Ronseal matt polyurethane varnish, the oil based one. Most model shops will have basswood, especially those dealing with model ships. I also find my local "serious" doll house shop a good supplier of modelling timbers. Cheers, Martin

Matt deck finish by Westquay Captain   Posted: 8 months ago
Hi all, I need to use a matt finish on my model of "Vanity" as she would have had scrubbed teak decks, in fact she still did when I lived on her! Used to leak like a basket, playing a gamalan orchestra in the many pots I had under the drips. So....can anyone recommend a nice reliably matt waterproof finish for the decks on the model. Cheers, Martin

Fiberglassing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 months ago
Hi chugalone 100 Welcome to the site. You can fibreglass with different types of resin and cloth. If you are making and casting a fibreglass hull use fibreglass matting but to cover a hull lightweight fibreglass cloth is best. This is the type shown in the suggested video. Resin can be epoxy or polyester based but the latter is generally cheaper and in my opinion is easier to use and doesn't require thinning with alcohol. It is sold as layup resin and is supplied with hardener. Do follow the instructions re quantity of each part and mix thoroughly. If you are using epoxy Iso Propyl Alcohol is the type to use and is clear. The video shows using a brush to apply the resin and whilst this is OK it will give a very thick and heavy coating. I use the brush to apply and then a credit card sized piece of plasticard to spread the resin over and into the surface of the cloth resulting in an almost opaque finish with the weave showing through. You do need to have a good surface to work with as any imperfections will show when the resin hardens. Once dry give a light sanding all over to remove any imperfections and fill any holes with car body filler and sand smooth. I then apply a very thin top coat of the resin using a brush. When dry use wet and dry to sand and if necessary apply further thin coats until you have the finish you require. I have a local supplier and if you visit the site http://www.resin-supplies.co.uk/product.htm all the resins/cloths etc are listed. Using Google should bring up a local supplier. you do need to follow the safety instructions to protect yourself and wear appropriate protection for your hands, eyes and breathing, it is also best to apply in a well ventilated area and not on a cold day. The end result will be well worth the effort to keep your tug waterproof. You could also paint the resin over thye inside of the hull to protect the wood from any water that doeos find its way inside. Dave

Applying the waterline. by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 months ago
Hi Mark Unless you are looking exactly at the side of the model with your eyes aligned to the level of the line it will look wrong because the spray rail is raised from the hull. If you remember the old type of analogue volt meter, the better ones used to have a mirror on the scale to ensure you were viewing from the correct angle. I suspect now that we have aired the matter many will notice this on model boats. I suppose we are all wishing to achieve the correct finish to our models and yes we are sometimes too exacting. Dave

Spraying the ‘anti fouling’ by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 months ago
I have seen examples of this boat with a bright red gloss finish for the anti-fouling and as nice and shiny as it looks I have decided to be true to the original colour scheme as much as possible. Red oxide primer is a very close colour match to anti fouling paint, apparently, so I found some Simoniz red oxide paint on eBay at a very good price. I’m led to believe that one paint maker (Holts ?) makes the same paint for Halfords, Simoniz and others, it’s an acrylic paint with a matt finish so there should be no compatibility problems. Masking off the hull with a couple of layers of newspaper is quick and easy and it’s ready to go into the spray booth. First coat on and it’s looking good, second coat after 20 minutes or so and I’m really happy with the results and the Simoniz paint is perfectly compatible with the Halfords primer. For good measure I’ll spray a third coat after the first two have hardened overnight, I’ll give the surface a very light key with a fine abrasive pad first. Then it’s on to the rest of the hull with the black gloss.

What Colour? by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
Hi Steve, also a possibility is grey primer, if you want a matt finish Mark

DAMEN STAN 4207 by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
The weather has turned colder and forstalled any temptations to spend valuable boat building time outdoors. Have now been able to focus on finishing the hull. This was done with the usual technique of rubbing down (both mechanical and manual) and then filling any depressions or defects with either wood filler or glaze putty. Then rubbing down again ' and again! After each completed rub sprayed the hull with aerosol paint, initially primer, then working up to colour and finally a clear matte to protect the decals and dull the earlier gloss finish. I prefer to use gloss for the intermediate coats as it reveals the surface defects clearly. The only problem encountered was with the opening stern gate, after much trial usage this began to get a 'chatter' during opeation. Dismantled and examined the micro servo and found that several small gear teeth had broken off. Attributed this to operating the gate by hand during the build. In future will only operate the gate under power. Whilst more time consuming this prevents any tendency for the linkage to go over centre and lock up, thus overloading and breaking the small gear teeth. The pictures show the hull finished up to deck level. There are no fittings installed. From now on anticipate the model completion will follow traditional lines, so will confine blog entries to those that either capture a milestone, or where something interesting or unusal has happened.

Fireboat Paint by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 years ago
Hi Cliff, I think the red and black of the hull would have been gloss, pride in the ship but also a gloss finish allows the hull less friction through the water, the deck would probably have a matt non-slip finish, to allow the crew to pass mooring lines etc without risk of falling in. Hope this helps Mark