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>> Home > Tags > matt

matt
matt
SG&K 1920 Gentlemans Runabout Mk2 by canabus Lieutenant   Posted: 13 days ago
Hi Guys Only more planking, but, I can finally start to see the hull shape. The veneer planking is dam strong and very light. The only part which I think I maybe required another stringer is the cockpit between the stringer and the sides, but, I will add some 2 ounce fibreglass matt when I resin the inside.

Best Tx systems for boats by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Hi All, don't think that that is quite what Nick meant! Most TX/RX sets nowadays are full of tricks and mixers for the fly boys; first setup question: 'Fixed wing or rotary?' for example! So - Nick: essentially it doesn't matter what you use (except the 35MHz rule of course!) but modifying all the aircraft mixer routines to suit boats is not for the faint hearted or novice. Therefore for your purposes I would recommend a relatively simple 2 to 4 channel set intended for trucks and cars. That gives you the basic control functions, including motor reverse, plus possibility to control a few specials, lighting or sound (horns) for instance. 2.4GHz is the future, but not without it's own pitfalls, as you've already discovered 🤔 I still use my old MC-10 40MHz set; - a) Cos it still works 👍😉 b) It's quick to set up for trials of a new boat or function, 👍 c) the more people move to 2.4GHz the less chance I have of getting any interference! 👍😊 (I have several TX/RX crystal sets anyway 😊 Bought up anything I could find locally the last few years) d) One of my models is a submarine! e) It can also store the setup configuration for 20 models. 👍 f) has no binding rigmarole. 👍👍 Cheers and very happy modelling / sailing, Doug 😎

Best Tx systems for boats by NickW Lieutenant   Posted: 24 days ago
Ok a daft question....are there any Tx systems we should NOT use for boats? A lot of the more expensive ones appear to be for planes and cars etc.....or shouldn't/doesn't it matter?

Working radar by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
Hi Dave, I did! Same result no matter which link i tried - Timeout'! 🤔😭 Ho Hum! I'm obviously not meant to know 😉 Never mind I have sources of micro motors over here. Have already bought several for the planned Plastic Magic projects. All the best, Doug 😎

water, paint, copper by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
The gun deck isn't modeled. I was building a model intended to sail in open water and didn't want to deal with open gun ports, hatches, etc. After glassing the hull, she got beams for the spar deck installed. 3/4" x 3/4", they're probably a bit more than was needed. Tubes were installed for 5/16" stainless threaded rods that would hold her external ballast on. The forward one will be disguised as her galley stovepipe, the aft one is hidden under the cabin skylight. The ballast is a 2" i.d. PVC pipe about 4 feet long, filled with lead bird-shot, and weighing some 42 pounds. With that much done, I took her to the creek to see her float, but I forgot the rods. A few days later I took her out again, remembering the rods, and put her lower masts in her. Now baptized, I applied the moldings and trim on her stern, and built up her enclosed head. Her gunport were molded in resin in the closed position with the guns clamped in the openings and a tampion in the muzzles. These were epoxied into gunports cut from the outer layer of glass and wood battens, leaving the matting in place as a backer. Then she got some paint, mainly because I was getting tired of her looking like a barkless log. The bottom was painted with copper paint, but three rolls of 1/2" wide peel-n-stick tape had just arrived and I started into coppering her bottom right off. Copper plates are nailed on with copper nails with counter-sunk heads through pre-punched holes in the copper sheets. The are FLAT with with a little hollow where they're driven in just beyond flush with the surface. They are NOT round headed nor look like rivets as so many models insist are doing. I pressed an impression of the nails into the face of each plate. Installing them pushes this dent back out and leaves a little circle that looks as it should. It took about a week to do one side, and I took a break to make the tops for the lower masts, then continued onto coppering the other side. It was bright and beautiful when finished, but it wouldn't stay that way. Copper doesn't turn green when submerged, any copper coin will show you it turns brown. I wanted her bottom to brown somewhat, but not too much, and I figured to let that happen naturally. When it got where I wanted it, I'd clear-coat it to lock it in. Two yards of Dupont Supplex cloth was ordered to make her sails. This is the stuff SC&H used on their square-rigger kits and it's great for making sails. Being a nylon, you cut it with a hot-knife, and use a pointed tip in a soldering iron to make grommets. I drew on the panel seams with a .03 marker as even the finest stitching is over scale even at 1:36. Top-cloths, corner reinforces, reef bands, etc, are all cut from the same cloth and glued on with fabric adhesive. The only sewing was of the bolt-ropes. These are done by hand much the way real ones are - I've sewn a few miles of real bolt ropes in my time. There's really no substitute for this if you want a functional scale appearing sail. A machine can't sew it properly, in the right position, or securely.

Constellation by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
This model was started in February of 1999, and has been worked on, at best, in fits and starts. While progress has been made, and it's capable of sailing, it's far from finished. It began as plywood paneling pulled from the walls of my first house and cut into frames. It was to be planked with white pine strips, also scraps from remodeling, but I was distracted by a book. Nasty things books, put all sorts of ideas in your head. I got the idea of making a plug for a mold so I could turn out THREE hulls! One for me, one for sale, and one to be donated to the real ship. To that end, and with the inspiration of the book, instead of planking, I battened the hull and sheathed it with brown paper wet-n-stick packing tape. Let's just say, that wasn't a good idea and leave it at that. A lot of life changes happened; moved to a farm; got unmarried, sold the farm, got an apartment, got a house with a workshop, and 10 years later, recommenced work on the model. I continued on with the original plan for about a day when I shifted gears and decided to glass the "plug" and make it a hull. I proceeded to prep it to that end, but looking back, what I should have done was strip it down the the forms and start again, planking it properly. Instead, I covered the outside with 4oz cloth, filled between the battens with poly resin and glass matting. The images show the model from it's start to it's glassing, though the site won't allow me to dictate the order in which they're presented - sorry for that. The model is of the American sloop of war Constellation launched in 1855, and as she appeared in Naples in 1856 based on a painting of her by Thomas deSimone. She is 1:36 scale; 1 inch = 3 feet. Beam: 13-5/8" (34.6 cm) Length on deck: 61" (154.9 cm) Length between perpendiculars (American): 59-1/8" (150.2 cm) Draft, without ballast keel: 7" (17.8 cm) With 3-1/2" ballast keel: 10-1/2" (26.7 cm) Weight, with ballast: Approx. 100 pounds (45.36 kg) Length over the rig: 95" (241.3 cm) Width over the rig: 30.5" (77.5 cm) ~ Main yard w/o stuns'l booms. Height bottom of keel to main truck, without ballast keel: 65" (165.1 cm) With ballast keel: 69" (175.3 cm) Total Sail Area: 2,807.01 square inches in 17 sails (19.5 sf, 18,110 scm, 1.8 sqm) Working Sail Area: 1,836.1square inches in 13 sails (12.75 sf, 11,845 scm, 1.2 sqm)

what fittings for a plane prop by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
The only thing you need is a prop driver attachment, bolts on with grub screws, prop size does not matter as you reame the prop hub to the correct diameter, dont get a small hub prop, get one designed to go on lecy drive

3D printing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Wayne I did warn you about the noise. I also have complaints about the smell but I do use a heated bed and my printer is not in an enclosure. I have to agree that a usb stick is the best option to use as the timescale can be hours if not days and adding a PC and LAN to the equation does not help. I bought my printer to make originals that I can then make castings off. I can take any CAD drawing and scale to any size so the process is both quick and straightforward. As you have found there is a wealth of subject matter on line. Whilst a 3D printer is great for small quantities it is not so good if you intend mass production. Many hearing printer perhaps believe the 3D process will be just as quick when in fact it is anything but quick. I have to ask, how are you progressing with the Arduino? Have fun Dave

Worcester Model Boat Club Open Day by cormorant Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
I am so sorry Ed. It was in no way meant to be a criticism. I just wanted to give Matthew as much information as possible. Steve

Worcester Model Boat Club Open Day by cormorant Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Thanks Ed and Matthew. The cafe serves food all day from cooked breakfasts to lunchtime carvery and all things in between. There is also ample free parking. Steve

Worcester Model Boat Club Open Day by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Matthew, I've never been there but, I've been told there is a Cafe! http://www.cobhouse.org/mayfly-cafe/ this is the website to the Cafe Ed.

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi All, Lord Nelson varnish appears to be a Krick product from Germany! http://www.krickshop.de/Products/Paints-Accessories/Paints-f... produced for them by a Belgian company - http://www.ghiant.com/brands/modellers/lord-nelson/ Must also be available in UK? For example http://www.anticsonline.co.uk/1368_1_2970537.html There is also a spray can version- http://hobby.uk.com/ style='background-color:yellow;'>matt-varnish-300ml-spray.html Happy varnishing 😉 Cheers Doug 😎

Er slight Problem by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi When you started the build I saw that you had a good strong flat board and had supported the keel in several places. It looked as though it was all going well until you started to skin the hull with very heavy balsa(?). When applying skins the hull does need to be supported at all times and skins applied equally to both sides at the same time. Wood has a nasty habit of shrinking as it dries, and doing equal planking on both sides helps compensate. When we built the Titanic and Olympic the hulls were built upside down and remained on the build board until all planking was complete. We used 4mm balsa sheets. and covered inside and out with fibreglass matting and cloth. To use this method you need to extend each former so that the hull is level to the board with a gap at the bottom when you have finished. Couple of pics attached may help explain. Good luck with the rebuild Dave

The Kent Clearview screen by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
There is a white metal ‘ring’ supplied in the kit for the Kent Clearview screen but it is too large and doesn’t look particularly ‘scale’. So after some research on the web and some help from other forum members I found enough information to make one from scratch. The outer ring was made from a narrow section of pvc pipe that I had to hand and this was cut to length in a mitre block and then sanded down to the right thickness on some abrasive paper and then sprayed matt black. I didn’t use the perspex screen supplied in the kit as the hole was too large but the small circular cut-out piece was the right diameter to fit into the ring that I made, the new screen was cut from a new piece of perspex sheet and a hole drilled through the centre to locate the rotating part of the screen. The parts were assembled onto the new screen using canopy glue applied very sparingly with a dressmaking pin. The motor drive assembly on the inside of the screen and the black triangular part that sits on the outside of the screen were made from some black plasticard and these parts were also fixed in place with canopy glue. I used a brass panel pin with the head filed down and painted black for the central bearing of the screen but when I applied a very small amount of canopy glue to fix it capillary action unexpectedly drew the glue between the two ‘panes’ of perspex 😡 Not what I wanted to happen but I decided to leave it to dry to it’s clear state and then assess the situation. Fortunately the glue is not too conspicuous to be much of a concern but it is nevertheless an unwanted blemish that I will have to accept 😭 The finished piece was then glued into the wheelhouse with a few dots of canopy glue and looks quite good as long as you don’t look too closely 😎

Couplings by BOATSHED Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Doug, Many thanks for your advice on the Taycol wiring.The ESC I am using is for reversing as well. I am not too good on the electrics and reading the electrical diagrams. But the centre diagram you have posted seems straight forward to me. I also have a Taycol Double Special that I will be using. Will your centre wiring diagram be the same for use with the Double Special. Also would it matter if a 10amp Bridge Rectifier was used and on a quick search all I can find is at Maplins is a Resin-Dipped Ceramic 100pF Capacitor would this be sufficient. Tom.