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>> Home > Tags > model boat mag

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Bob the Duck by EricMB Lieutenant   Posted: 6 days ago
Built after a challenge from the late Bob Hutton, and featured in this Nov 2017's Model Boats magazine... 'from an idea to the water' See the videos on YouTube, just search Bob the Duck

Robbe Smaragd by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Hi Neil, Brian Roberts did a makeover article for the 'Emerald' in Model Boats mag a year or so ago which might help you - http://www.modelboats.co.uk/news/article/smaragd-makeover/14... Afraid the only docs (pdfs) I have are in the original German🤔 Cheers Doug 😎

FLYSKY FS-I6S TRANSMITTER by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
I have just ordered one to raffle for my club. We have similar FlySky sets in the club and they are suitable for all model boats. The set up is straight forward and all the controls you need such as end point and throw are available and as you say touch screen. You can also mix two channels to work off one stick (mainsail plus fore sail). No protruding aerial to get damaged and two buttons to switch on or off. There are reviews on U-tube and one did complain about the shape not allowing the set to stand on its base. This is possibly a benefit as there is no chance of it being knocked over. There is also an add on to allow a mobile phone or tablet to be attached above the Tx. There is two way comms that allows monitoring of the rx battery so I am guessing more comms can be added to work with the phone/tablet screen. I'll know more when I get my hands on the kit and will then post more details. The earlier versions need a software update so check that yours has been updated if you are not computer savvy. Spare receivers are also cheap to buy.

FELIX by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 23 days ago
Hi Dave, actually it's a Harbour Tender, not a tug! The Home Port Zdenek has given her is Prague in English (although the original is based in Hamburg) ! Lovely city, once saw a Stones concert there👍😊 Prague I mean! Zdenek speaks Czech and Russian and some German, but his English is 'Google English'.😉 His work is superb, he has his own website with an incredible number of ship models par excellence of the most varied types. Somewhere in his numerous posts is the URL for his site. Maybe you can find videos there. See also his extensive Boat Harbour posts here 👍 He was kind enough to point me in the direction of a source of mini motors suitable for Plastic Magic, and also mailed me the plans for HMS Tyne, a ship I once worked on. An extremely talented and friendly guy.👍👍 Cheers Doug 😎

TAMIYA. King George V. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Hi Colin, see what you mean!🤔 I have a digital subscription to Model Boats so I can read it online😉 Have 'extracted' the KGV &PoW article as pdf file. 😉 Unfortunately the stupid HTML reader only lets you 'print' two pages at a time so I ended up with 5 files! PM me your email and I will send them to you. This site has no pdf file handler🤔😡 In the meantime here's an article from the same guy describing the RC conversion of KM Bismarck, at 1:700 !! 😲 It's from the Forum. http://www.modelboats.co.uk/news/article/plastic-magic-km-bi... Cheers Doug 😎

TAMIYA. King George V. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
Hi Colin, in model boats mag May 2017 there is an article from Tony Dalton on converting both the KGV and Prince of Wales from Tamiya. Just what we both need! Tony has done many of these conversions and written them all up in Model Boats. If you register with the forum (free) you can read online and print pages. Or buy a back issue. Don't worry about the most filigree bits, leave 'em off until the boat works on the water. Then you can consider if they are worth fitting, or making more robust; e.g thin mast bits from brass wire instead of the plastic. have fun anyway. Cheers Doug 😎

TAMIYA. King George V. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
Hi Colin, what scale is it? If you Google 'Plastic Magic' you should get lots of example of this from 350 / 400 scale carriers and battleships down to 72 scale Vosper MTB, KM S100 / E-Boat etc. There are also several Plastic magic articles in Model Boats magazine. The general principles are always the same: lightweight miniaturised electronics incl. servos! Do a max payload test on the bare hull as the very first thing. Weigh the major superstructure assemblies and decks and subtract from max payload: that's what's left for electronics and battery! The kit props are generally useless, no pitch, so make your own out of tinplate or 0.5mm brass. can be a little oversize, no one will know😉 Prop shafts and tubes: 2mm OD / 1mm ID brass tube with 1mm silver steel or piano wire shafts. Couplings from shrink sleeve. will dig out some motor types and sources tomorrow, there are also some given in the Model Boats mag articles. That's where I found the Micron Radio tip😊 Can heartily recommend Micron radio for the smallest combination RX and ESC on one tiny board that I've ever seen! Talk to Andy Rutter, he offers excellent advice and will fit tiny connectors and pre-program the RX board to match what you want to do. He also has very very tiny servos which are ideal.👍 http://www.micronradiocontrol.co.uk/ Look under RC components - 'Deltang Ultra micro'. you ain't gonna get no teeny weenier! I went weak today 😲 and ordered a 350 scale Prince of Wales, to match my 350 scale Bismarck, Hood and Ark Royal. Battle of Denmark Straight here we come! Cost a tad more than 25 pence though 🤔 Good luck Doug 😎

SCRATCH FISHING BOAT by basilsdad Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
I have for sale my model fishing boat which was scratch built from a model boat magazine plan, forgot who designed it though. it is built from balsa for the hull sides covered in a pair of the bosses tights before sealing and painting.The stern and deck are ply then painted to seal. all the deck and cabin fittings are scratch built from photos found on line. it is quite heavy about 10Lb of lead if I remember correctly, the length is 30" by 16" to keel bottom and beam 9", fitted with a 12v to 14V motor, 70 mm prop. Batteries and 320 amp fan cooled speed controller included, currently running off 12v 6 amp batteries. space needed for new project £150 or reasonable offers collection from Lincoln would be advisable due to size and weight. But could arrange delivery if required.

Individual Insurance by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Most model boat clubs offer insurance as part of the membership fee. My own club is no exception and we introduced this benefit to protect all our members in the event of an accident resulting in a claim for 3rd party damages. Previously we had relied on members arranging their own insurance, but it became increasingly difficult to ensure that every member's insurance was current and up to date as it had been taken out at different times. I agree generally model boats are less likely to give rise to a claim as compared to a flying model or even a model car as they are sailing in water and therefore not near the general public. However accident can and do happen and the club and all its members may be held responsible so Club insurance is really important. We live in a society where it is common practice to blame someone else for our own actions and organised clubs and societies make easy targets. I suspect the biggest risk is when the models are on the bank or at a display where masts and other sharp bits can cause injury. Insurance cost is based on the risks and probability. The larger the user base the more spread the risk and the cost. I suspect there are insufficient model boaters so insurers prefer to offer cover for all modelling risks. I do believe MPBA have a country members scheme that may suit your purpose, however it works out at twice the cost my club charges members for insurance. Sail safely Dave

Individual Insurance by epmbcmember Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
As a club member I am covered by the clubs insurance but does anyone know of an insurance company that will insure on an individual basis. There are general modelers insurances available but is there one specifically for model boaters as if you have a general modelers insurance this includes model aircraft which I would have thought would have a very much greater risk factor hence being more expensive. A model aircraft can do a great deal of damage and injury to a person or property while it is hard to believe that a scale model boat can.

fy55 by basilsdad Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 38"/12500g fy55 Capable of 8mph and a runtime of 120mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 65mm) Direct Drive to a 900 12 volt (3 Blade) Powered by Lead Acid (12v) 6Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through 120 amp (5Amps) ESC - Comments: scratch built from a model boat magaze plan forgot who designed it though. it is built from balsa for the hull sides covered in a pair of the bosses tights before sealing and painting.The stern and deck are ply then painted to seal. all the deck and cabin fittings are scratch built from photoes found on line , the model is an on going projectadding fittings when i am not sailing it.

huntsman plan by Black Dog Jack Seaman   Posted: 2 months ago
Model Boats magazine January 2016 ncluded a free plan of a Huntsman 31 complete with photos and a step by step build guide. Unfortunately the model is 24". I also wanted a bigger model so I redrew the plan double size. It wasn't too difficult and only took a couple of evenings with a some lining paper from B&Q and a calculator and voila! At the moment I am planking the roof of the cabins and trying to decide between a brushless motor and an old Weston rare earth brushed motor I used to use for fast electrics. The article in MB also ran into February 2016 where all the fiddly finishing bits were described, also with many photos. I expect one can obtain back issues from their web site. Anyone interested in Huntsmen should get these two issues for the detail alone.

Sea Queen refurbishment by BOATSHED Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
"rolfman2000" I didn't know there was a 46" Sea Commander. I just assumed that the Sea Queen was a larger version of the Sea Commander but just renamed. I have never seen an advert in any of the old model boat magazines for one. I have many old magazines some even from back in the 1960's and not seen one in them.

1960 Keil Kraft catalogue. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
While doing a bit of research on model boat fittings I came across this Keil Kraft catalogue on the RClibrary website. http://rclibrary.co.uk/title_details.asp?ID=1025 It makes for very interesting reading and has a foreword by Eddie Keil and an article by the legendary Vic Smeed. There's lot's more great vintage magazines on the site too 😁 EDIT. Check this one out as well: http://rclibrary.co.uk/title_details.asp?ID=1184 It has a boatbuilding article by L J Rowell Robbob.

Ship's Boats by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 4 months ago
Building a model ship often means building several models because most ships have boats. Constellation had six. My method for building boats is nearly the same for building larger hulls and real boats - planks over forms. I have a 1:12th scale drawing of Constellation's boat's in particular from the National Archives. They not only printed me a copy, but gave me a .tif image which I easily re-scaled to 1:36. I reproduced the lines as forms extended to a baseline so the boat could be built upside down. I drew each boat's patterns and arraged each to fit on a sheet of copy paper. I print this on a full sheet label so I can rough cut them, stick them on the form material, and then cut the forms. I had a few sheets of 1/8" balsa sheet and that's what I cut the forms from. A pine plank was used for the building-board, and marked where each station would go, then the forms were glued on making sure each was 90° to the form and square to the center-line. A note on the build-board, it doesn't have to be as wide as the boat, and should, in fact, be narrower. Then you can access inside the sheer and planking and removing the boat from the forms will be much easier. A small plank of 3/4" stock will let you get rubber bands completely around the model, and it will also fit in a vice which is very convenient. The edges of the forms are shaped so the planks will lie flat on the surface, and not teeter on the corners. Using balsa makes this easy work, though you have to be careful not to snap them off the build board. I started with the ship's 1st cutter, which is a lap-strake, or clinker-built boat. (Only the launch is carvel planked) It's frames are 1/16" thick bass strips 3/32" wide. Each frame is dipped in ammonia and bent over it's form. I put a dab of glue at the ends that would eventually be cut off to hold it to the form, but for the frames on the wine-glass and hollow forms at the ends I used rubber bands to pull them into shape. Part of the reasoning behind using balsa for the forms is if anything gets glued that shouldn't, it's the form and not the model that will give-way first. The stem, stern-post, and keel are 1/16" bass, assembled together while flat. First the top corners of the keel were planed off to make a sort of rabbet. The transom is also bass as it stays in the boat. The transom is cut taller to reach the build-board, and partially cut at what will be it's top to make it easier when it's time to detach the boat. It's glued to the stern post and the build-board, the keel is glued to each frame, and the stem is glued to the build-board. This pretty much forms the rigid skeleton of the boat. There's two ways to represent lapstrake planking on so small a model. One way is to sand each plank so it's half as thick at it's top edge as its bottom. The planks are butted on the boat, thick against thin, giving the impression of overlapped planks. I chose to actually overlap the planks because the inside of the boat is open to view. Since each plank of a lapstrake boat overlaps the one below it, each plank has to be spieled, or shaped to fit, and the boat must be planked from the keel to the sheer. I divide the length of the widest frame from the keel to the sheer into the number of planks I want, then divide the lengths of the stem and the stern by this number. You'll find the planks will get narrow forward, and flare wider back aft. You may have to experiment a bit with the number of planks so maintain at least 2 scale inches forward and not more than 5 scale inches aft, or the planking will look nonsensical and out-of-scale. I planked the cutter in 1/32" thick bass. The first planks are the garboards, next to the keel. The next plank I places a strip of card along side and used a piece of plank against the edge of the wood plank to mark the card. The marks are actually the bottom edge of the plank. Each plank is shaped on it's bottom edge to the plank before, and it's top edge is straight. Then I dip it in ammonia and clamp it in place, where "clamps" are rubber bands, blocks of wood, pins, clothes pins, whatever works. Again, a narrow build-board allows the rubber bands to pull in as you reach the sheer rather than pulling them away from the boat. Once your brain gets wrapped around spieling, the planking will move along. But don't try to do too much too fast or you'll just get frustrated and ruin everything. Take lots of breaks. The planks need to be sanded thinner at their ends, almost to nothing, depending how much of a rabbit was cut into the stem. At the stern they run right off the transom and are cut flush. You can notch the transom into step for each plank to fit into, of fill the little gaps where they overlap with putty later. Since they're getting painted, I used putty. When the planking is done up to the sheer, it's best to add rub rails and strakes while the boat's still on the forms. I then finished the cut in the transom, cut off the stem near the build-board, and nipped off each frame where it was glued to the form. Then carefully lift the boat off the forms. Some form may have come off with it, and some spots may need to be reglued. I installed frames between each of the ones the boat was built on, putting a frame about every scale foot. Seat clamps, floor boards, seats, oar notches, lifting eyes, mast steps, etc, are all added bit-by-bit. before you know it, you've got another model boat. I'll get into the launch next.