Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
October 2017: 6 people
September 2017: 15 people
August 2017: 10 people
July 2017: 16 people
June 2017: 8 people
May 2017: 8 people
April 2017: 23 people
March 2017: 9 people
February 2017: 5 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (27)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > model boats mag

model boats mag
fairey huntsman
huntsman
lesro sportsman
precedent huntsman
coats
cornwall model boats
flying boats
model boats
model boats magazine
paddle boats
smaller boats
toy boats
working boats
93 fireboat
94 fireboat
air boat
alpine tug boat
boat building
boat club
boat house
boat museum
boat show
boat yard
boating
fast patrol boat
fire boat
fireboat
fireboat funday
fishing boat
jet boat
lesro pilot boat
lifeboat
lobster boat
lobster fishing boat
midwest lobster boat
model boat club
model boat mag
model boat show
paddle boat
patrol boat
pilot boat
police boat
portland model power boat association
power boat
proboat ragazza
pt boat
racing boat
rc boat
sailboat
san pedro push boat
seaport workboat
shrimp boat
speedboat
steam boat
swift boat vietnam
torpedo boat
36 rater model yacht
brilliant model
cornwall models
howes models
lesro models
mantua models
marine modelling
marine models
model
model ketch
model makers
model ship world
model shop
model show
model slipway
model world
model yacht
modeller
scale model
shg model
sussex models
tyne models
vintage model boat
vintage model boat company
vintage model works
vintagemodelworks
westbourne models
wooden model
model boats mag
Bob the Duck by EricMB Lieutenant   Posted: 5 days ago
Built after a challenge from the late Bob Hutton, and featured in this Nov 2017's Model Boats magazine... 'from an idea to the water' See the videos on YouTube, just search Bob the Duck

Robbe Smaragd by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
Hi Neil, Brian Roberts did a makeover article for the 'Emerald' in Model Boats mag a year or so ago which might help you - http://www.modelboats.co.uk/news/article/smaragd-makeover/14... Afraid the only docs (pdfs) I have are in the original German🤔 Cheers Doug 😎

FLYSKY FS-I6S TRANSMITTER by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
I have just ordered one to raffle for my club. We have similar FlySky sets in the club and they are suitable for all model boats. The set up is straight forward and all the controls you need such as end point and throw are available and as you say touch screen. You can also mix two channels to work off one stick (mainsail plus fore sail). No protruding aerial to get damaged and two buttons to switch on or off. There are reviews on U-tube and one did complain about the shape not allowing the set to stand on its base. This is possibly a benefit as there is no chance of it being knocked over. There is also an add on to allow a mobile phone or tablet to be attached above the Tx. There is two way comms that allows monitoring of the rx battery so I am guessing more comms can be added to work with the phone/tablet screen. I'll know more when I get my hands on the kit and will then post more details. The earlier versions need a software update so check that yours has been updated if you are not computer savvy. Spare receivers are also cheap to buy.

TAMIYA. King George V. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 23 days ago
Hi Colin, see what you mean!🤔 I have a digital subscription to Model Boats so I can read it online😉 Have 'extracted' the KGV &PoW article as pdf file. 😉 Unfortunately the stupid HTML reader only lets you 'print' two pages at a time so I ended up with 5 files! PM me your email and I will send them to you. This site has no pdf file handler🤔😡 In the meantime here's an article from the same guy describing the RC conversion of KM Bismarck, at 1:700 !! 😲 It's from the Forum. http://www.modelboats.co.uk/news/article/plastic-magic-km-bi... Cheers Doug 😎

TAMIYA. King George V. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Hi Colin, in model boats mag May 2017 there is an article from Tony Dalton on converting both the KGV and Prince of Wales from Tamiya. Just what we both need! Tony has done many of these conversions and written them all up in Model Boats. If you register with the forum (free) you can read online and print pages. Or buy a back issue. Don't worry about the most filigree bits, leave 'em off until the boat works on the water. Then you can consider if they are worth fitting, or making more robust; e.g thin mast bits from brass wire instead of the plastic. have fun anyway. Cheers Doug 😎

TAMIYA. King George V. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Hi Colin, what scale is it? If you Google 'Plastic Magic' you should get lots of example of this from 350 / 400 scale carriers and battleships down to 72 scale Vosper MTB, KM S100 / E-Boat etc. There are also several Plastic magic articles in Model Boats magazine. The general principles are always the same: lightweight miniaturised electronics incl. servos! Do a max payload test on the bare hull as the very first thing. Weigh the major superstructure assemblies and decks and subtract from max payload: that's what's left for electronics and battery! The kit props are generally useless, no pitch, so make your own out of tinplate or 0.5mm brass. can be a little oversize, no one will know😉 Prop shafts and tubes: 2mm OD / 1mm ID brass tube with 1mm silver steel or piano wire shafts. Couplings from shrink sleeve. will dig out some motor types and sources tomorrow, there are also some given in the Model Boats mag articles. That's where I found the Micron Radio tip😊 Can heartily recommend Micron radio for the smallest combination RX and ESC on one tiny board that I've ever seen! Talk to Andy Rutter, he offers excellent advice and will fit tiny connectors and pre-program the RX board to match what you want to do. He also has very very tiny servos which are ideal.👍 http://www.micronradiocontrol.co.uk/ Look under RC components - 'Deltang Ultra micro'. you ain't gonna get no teeny weenier! I went weak today 😲 and ordered a 350 scale Prince of Wales, to match my 350 scale Bismarck, Hood and Ark Royal. Battle of Denmark Straight here we come! Cost a tad more than 25 pence though 🤔 Good luck Doug 😎

Added extras by Skydive130 Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Here are some shots of the main plan and the proposed electronics going into my Solent. My only issue is whether my choice of motors is suitable? I've gone with 2 x 600 brushed motors on 15 inch shafts and 45mm brass props which I purchased before reading the article in Septembers model boats mag. The author in that has gone with 2 x 850's? With my aircraft experience, it's strange going "backwards" with brushed motors instead of the aircraft industry standard of using brushless motors, esc's and lipo battery's! And to cap it all, I've not go any aircraft that could possibly drag let alone lift the 12v 7amp lead acid battery that I've bought for this boat! Any thoughts on motor choice would be appreciated, apart from that I'm good with the electrics. The Mtroniks sound board and speaker is a blast using the Napier diesel sound chip. Another shot shows some of the decor going on, i.e. RNLI decals, numbering for "Douglas Currie", portholes, anchor, handrail stanchions. Other decor, doors, bollards etc coming from Macs soon. Last show shows the finished working radar built from scrap and painted in VW brilliant orange which I believe is a recognised match. One last question, can someone please give me an approx size for the 3mm main deck stanchions which I will fashion from brass tube and soldered eyelets, rope thickness would be helpful too, many thanks

huntsman plan by Black Dog Jack Seaman   Posted: 2 months ago
Model Boats magazine January 2016 ncluded a free plan of a Huntsman 31 complete with photos and a step by step build guide. Unfortunately the model is 24". I also wanted a bigger model so I redrew the plan double size. It wasn't too difficult and only took a couple of evenings with a some lining paper from B&Q and a calculator and voila! At the moment I am planking the roof of the cabins and trying to decide between a brushless motor and an old Weston rare earth brushed motor I used to use for fast electrics. The article in MB also ran into February 2016 where all the fiddly finishing bits were described, also with many photos. I expect one can obtain back issues from their web site. Anyone interested in Huntsmen should get these two issues for the detail alone.

Ship's Boats by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 4 months ago
Building a model ship often means building several models because most ships have boats. Constellation had six. My method for building boats is nearly the same for building larger hulls and real boats - planks over forms. I have a 1:12th scale drawing of Constellation's boat's in particular from the National Archives. They not only printed me a copy, but gave me a .tif image which I easily re-scaled to 1:36. I reproduced the lines as forms extended to a baseline so the boat could be built upside down. I drew each boat's patterns and arraged each to fit on a sheet of copy paper. I print this on a full sheet label so I can rough cut them, stick them on the form material, and then cut the forms. I had a few sheets of 1/8" balsa sheet and that's what I cut the forms from. A pine plank was used for the building-board, and marked where each station would go, then the forms were glued on making sure each was 90° to the form and square to the center-line. A note on the build-board, it doesn't have to be as wide as the boat, and should, in fact, be narrower. Then you can access inside the sheer and planking and removing the boat from the forms will be much easier. A small plank of 3/4" stock will let you get rubber bands completely around the model, and it will also fit in a vice which is very convenient. The edges of the forms are shaped so the planks will lie flat on the surface, and not teeter on the corners. Using balsa makes this easy work, though you have to be careful not to snap them off the build board. I started with the ship's 1st cutter, which is a lap-strake, or clinker-built boat. (Only the launch is carvel planked) It's frames are 1/16" thick bass strips 3/32" wide. Each frame is dipped in ammonia and bent over it's form. I put a dab of glue at the ends that would eventually be cut off to hold it to the form, but for the frames on the wine-glass and hollow forms at the ends I used rubber bands to pull them into shape. Part of the reasoning behind using balsa for the forms is if anything gets glued that shouldn't, it's the form and not the model that will give-way first. The stem, stern-post, and keel are 1/16" bass, assembled together while flat. First the top corners of the keel were planed off to make a sort of rabbet. The transom is also bass as it stays in the boat. The transom is cut taller to reach the build-board, and partially cut at what will be it's top to make it easier when it's time to detach the boat. It's glued to the stern post and the build-board, the keel is glued to each frame, and the stem is glued to the build-board. This pretty much forms the rigid skeleton of the boat. There's two ways to represent lapstrake planking on so small a model. One way is to sand each plank so it's half as thick at it's top edge as its bottom. The planks are butted on the boat, thick against thin, giving the impression of overlapped planks. I chose to actually overlap the planks because the inside of the boat is open to view. Since each plank of a lapstrake boat overlaps the one below it, each plank has to be spieled, or shaped to fit, and the boat must be planked from the keel to the sheer. I divide the length of the widest frame from the keel to the sheer into the number of planks I want, then divide the lengths of the stem and the stern by this number. You'll find the planks will get narrow forward, and flare wider back aft. You may have to experiment a bit with the number of planks so maintain at least 2 scale inches forward and not more than 5 scale inches aft, or the planking will look nonsensical and out-of-scale. I planked the cutter in 1/32" thick bass. The first planks are the garboards, next to the keel. The next plank I places a strip of card along side and used a piece of plank against the edge of the wood plank to mark the card. The marks are actually the bottom edge of the plank. Each plank is shaped on it's bottom edge to the plank before, and it's top edge is straight. Then I dip it in ammonia and clamp it in place, where "clamps" are rubber bands, blocks of wood, pins, clothes pins, whatever works. Again, a narrow build-board allows the rubber bands to pull in as you reach the sheer rather than pulling them away from the boat. Once your brain gets wrapped around spieling, the planking will move along. But don't try to do too much too fast or you'll just get frustrated and ruin everything. Take lots of breaks. The planks need to be sanded thinner at their ends, almost to nothing, depending how much of a rabbit was cut into the stem. At the stern they run right off the transom and are cut flush. You can notch the transom into step for each plank to fit into, of fill the little gaps where they overlap with putty later. Since they're getting painted, I used putty. When the planking is done up to the sheer, it's best to add rub rails and strakes while the boat's still on the forms. I then finished the cut in the transom, cut off the stem near the build-board, and nipped off each frame where it was glued to the form. Then carefully lift the boat off the forms. Some form may have come off with it, and some spots may need to be reglued. I installed frames between each of the ones the boat was built on, putting a frame about every scale foot. Seat clamps, floor boards, seats, oar notches, lifting eyes, mast steps, etc, are all added bit-by-bit. before you know it, you've got another model boat. I'll get into the launch next.

As of Summer 2017... by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 4 months ago
After the sail, I added some hardware to the spars, namely jackstays. I also ordered some aircraft plywood and used it to make new winch drums. These are sized to my current plan of only bracing the tops'l yards. Hopefully, this is the last set I'll have to make. Seeing into the dark interior of the hull can be a pain, more so the brighter it is outside. Mark got some red LEDs to light up the dash of his old pick-up (ute for my Assie friends) and gave me a left-over section. It requires a 12 volt supply (I'm running 6) and red doesn't really help in daylight, but I like the idea. If I can find a white LED strip that'll run on 6 volts, this will definitely get put in. The stern also had folding bulwarks like the bow, but that wrapped all the way around. On the real ship these were replace with a fixed bulwark except for a couple of panels that allowed access to the stern boat. By the time the ship came to Baltimore in 1955, these too were gone, with all their hardware. Again, I'm not making them functional, and decided to built these on the model rather than as separate pieces like on the bow. The hinges are represented inboard by card stock and brass eyes. The barrel portion of the hinges outboard at the bottom of each panel will be a little section of 1/16" wood dowel. The forward bulwarks were epoxied in place and the support rods were installed all around. The tops are raw because they all get a bright cap rail (varnished natural wood) and I'll put that on when it won't get messed up with paint or glue. A friend sent me a box of stuff, among which was a nive little cat face perfect for my catheads. Only having one, I was going to cast a pair in resin. But I'm out of casting resin and epoxy glue didn't set up in a way I liked, so we'll come back to that. The tops'l yards on the ship are hinged iron bands, line with wood staves. I wanted to replicate that functionality not only because that's what the ship has, but because it would allow me to take them off the mast without unrigging half the ship. I cut some heavy copper I use for everything and bent it into two half circles; soldiered brass tubing to the ends, and sawed out the notches with a jewelers saw. If only it had been that easy. Soldiering here tended to un-soldier there, cold soldier joints wouldn't hold. I gave up in frustration. I changed the gun carriages based on some research I did, but I'll post separate entries dealing with them and the ship's boats. I went looking for information on soldiering little things, and took another whack at the parrels. This time it worked out much better. I reused the copper band and brass tubing for the main and made the fore the same way. I still have to make the mizzen tops'l yard parrel, but my soldiering has gotten much much better. Last May ('17) I took the boat to the Baltimore Port Expo for National Maritime Day again, surrounded by members of our newly formed White Rocks Model Boat Club. I didn't manage to get her controls set-up in time, so she didn't go in the pool, but sat on her cart and looked pretty. I put her courses and trys'ls on her for this. The trys'ls won't be used when she sails, but can be set for static displays. The courses will get used, but I'll be able to buntl them up as shown to reduce sail. Also to reduce sail, the t'gallants and royals will be easily removable, or replaceable, as the case may be, depending on what wind there is. That pretty much brings us up to date as of July 2017. I'll post something about the boats and guns in a bit, as well as any other progress that's made. There's far more detail, images, and notes at my website on this, and the other models I'm working on at: http://todd.mainecav.org/model/ There's a few items I skimmed, or skipped over, like her signal flags, that are covered in detail there; like the day she was almost dismasted by the garage door.

"Vanity" leaves the building board by Westquay Captain   Posted: 5 months ago
Ah, my replacement copies of Plank-on-Frame Models have arrived. Indistinguishable from the copies I lent and never got back. I simply cannot be without these books. I've had them since I was wee loddy in Devon, when my love of quality model boats began. I was a member of the Thames Ship Lovers and Ship Model Society and got my first ever proper commission through them. Where are they now? They were one of the main London based clubs at one point, meeting in a Pub in the West End on a Tuesday night. I believe the magazine Model Shipwright came about through those meetings. Now, even that magnificent organ has gone. What is it about model boaters? No TSLSMS, no Scale Sail, no Model Shipwright. And no doubt Maritime Models has gone in Greenwich and Model Shipwrights in Putney. For a maritime nation all this is a disgrace. Martin

Scale Sailing Association by Westquay Captain   Posted: 5 months ago
The above was a big thing once. over 600 members! A nice magazine, a stand at the ME Exhibition. Then the guy who started it died and it seems the organisation with him. How can that be. 600 members? that's a lot to go quiet because one bloke dies ain't it? So, is anyone interested in resurrecting the Association? Scale sail is a pretty particular kind of boating, but by far the most satisfying. And that's from a very partial, biased person! If you would be interested in restarting the Scale Sailing Association, please let me know on here or the Model Boats Mag. forum and we'll see what can be done. Of course, if all 600 are now dead too, we're Foobarred! Cheers, Martin

Using old motors by Westquay Captain   Posted: 7 months ago
Hi Dave, many thanks for your answer. I wanted a scale speed of 25-40mh, so much slower than the real speed of that figure. As long as they just about plane I'll be happy. I've been trying to get a Bob's board for ages. My old friend has a few in his loft. He used to make all the display models, aircraft and boats, for Bob's models. My R/C gear at it's earliest is Mini Hex from 1971 or Digimac. I can't get the REP single channel I once had, but which was stolen. I should say that my old Crash Tender (which I really should finish some time 53 years later!) always ran a treat with it's Supermarine Special, using said REP sytem. The Basset-Lowke motor is a permanent magnet type so will probably be OK with an ESC, but I have no idea what sort to use as I don't understand them. All I read seems to suggest that they are either expensive or unreliable. And they need "programming", which totally puts me off! I have no model boat clubs near here, so would just use the local canalised river which has both sides accessible and is rarely used by full sized boats. But at least I don't have to worry about other R/C users. Looks like the world is much the same for old motors after all. Cheers, Martin

Rhonnda by ronrees Petty Officer   Posted: 7 months ago
[Score: 10/10] 34" Rhonnda Capable of 6mph and a runtime of 120mins Belt to a Turnigy 2830. (3 Blade) Powered by LiPoly (11.1v) 5Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Alex Engel Sub Commander 30 amp ESC - Comments: Own Design of 1909 Bristol Tug, Semi scale. Build using Foam and nylon stockings. Featured in Model Boats Mag March and April 2017. PlanFeature.

Help required please. by chippy Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 8 months ago
I'm wondering if anyone has built a model of the Bering motor yacht "Mila"? Drawing MM2068 from my hobby store. There was a short article about it in Model Boats Mag Dec 2011. This will be my next project and will be a plank on frame, but I'm not in a hurry just yet to get it completed. Any help or advice gratefully recieved. Thanks for reading.