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>> Home > Tags > model boats

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arun 54 by Midlife306 Captain   Posted: 3 days ago
Sorry I couldn't be any more help, I'm busy with other models, I've not got my head around lifeboats yet👍

Secure the hatches and raise the flags ! by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Hi jaffy, try Cornwall Model boats, there website is superb Mark

What Gun? by cormorant Admiral   Posted: 9 days ago
Hi Doug Sorry, I should have been more specific. It is/was on RSS P72 Sovereignty of the Singapore Navy. The boat is a 110' Vosper fast attack craft and I have a part built 1/24scale Veron model based on it. The official spec says that some boats were fitted with 40mm Bofors and some with 76.2mm Bofors. Please see pic of the real boat and a model which is in the Singapore Navy Museum Steve

Sea Queen refurbishment by BOATSHED Commander   Posted: 12 days ago
We need some pictures ?? Where did you get The Queen Dipped. I take it that's what you have had done. I have a Sea Queen and got her from a boot sale about 6 years ago.Still haven't started work on her. I have a few Aerokits, Sea Hornet, I made back in the 70's. Crash Tender, 48" Sea Commander, also from a boot fair Crash Tender 34" still in box unmade, 1994 when 50 were made on the 50th anniversary of the Aerokit model. When I saw it advertised in Model Boats grabbed one very quickly. Also have a Precedent Huntsman 31. Purchased that about 25 years ago. Had a 850 electric motor in her. Got a bit of a leak in the hull that's now sorted but she also needs a refurb now. As well as a Precedent Huntsman hull with no cabin top, going to make a top of some kind but different to the original. Hopefully will get round to them all one day. Plus quite a few other model boats.

Internet-wide day of action to Save Net Neutrality by Fireboat Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
Hi All, This is not directly Model Boats related and more for members living in the US at the moment, but it does affect this website in some part and could become a more global issue in the longer term. For those living in the US I do urge you to visit the link below and sign the petition to stop your Internet Service Providers having the ability to control the speeds of websites you visit. Today is in an internet-wide day of action to save net neutrality. https://www.battleforthenet.com/july12 If Internet Service Providers get their way, websites like this could be censored, slowed down, blocked, or forced to charge extra fees. It would be the end of the open web. Please help stop them and keep the internet open, fast and equal for all. Vote for an open and fair internet. Check out the press coverage here: https://www.fightforthefuture.org/news/2017-07-10-largest-we... http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-trending-40494909 How does this affect me? * In the US, the FCC will begin to allow ISP's to control what you see & do online in the next 60 days. This includes creating fast lanes for websites who pay and slow lanes for the rest. * In the EU, rules still require that all internet traffic has to be treated equally, without blocking or slowing down certain data... for now... If you don't agree with ISPs blocking and slowing down websites, or you don't agree with paying more for faster connections to certain services, then please show your support and help spread the word. Although this is primarily affecting the FCC laws in the US, the petition is not limited to US residents and in time will come to affect us all. The internet should be fast and equal. Thank you for showing your support and helping small websites like this receive equal rights to a fast internet. Model Boats Website Team

Dont throw your tins out. by BOATSHED Commander   Posted: 18 days ago
I have been into model boating since I was 9 (1959) ans still enjoy it. I moved up to Heywood in 1991 and lived there for 2 years and as I had nowhere to do things there and take model boats to use them, I left them down in my Greenwich flat. used to see people fishing in Queens Park so I thought I cannot use a model boat on there. So I went there fishing instead and also went out to Pilsbury and fished there. I was living in a house in Wild Street Heywood with my Ex wife. (yes EX). We were just getting back together. I only wish I had known there was a model boat club that I could have gone to. I had seen there was a pond/lake in the grounds of Mutual Mill as this was just at the end of Wild Street. I once asked a man at the gates of Mutual is I was allowed to fish in there and he said no it's private. I have since seen in the angling papers where they have had fishing days there. And also since joining this site I have seen it is also used for model boating. OH what a bummer, that was 2 years of using my model boats wasted 😭. We eventually moved down to Greenwich and she now rents the Heywood house out. And I go using my model boats down here now and also use them in the boatyard in Potter Heigham when we go up to Norfolk to my river boat up there.😊

Free model boat books by sonar Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 18 days ago
This site has a few free model boat books in PDF. free to download and read when You have the time. Also some older model boat plans.. http://www.rustic style='background-color:yellow;'>modelboats.com/books.html

The Launch by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 18 days ago
As soon as the cutter was off the build-board, I started on the launch. The launch is the largest of the ship's boats and the only one of them that's carvel planked. The build board was cut narrower for the reason spoken of earlier. Since the frame spacing was the same, I could reuse most of the marks. The stem, keel, sternpost, and transom plus a sternpost knee, were assembled. The forms were cut from balsa again, sanded to the line and rough beveled, then glued to the board. The ribs are 1/16" thick x 1/8" wide bass again. This time I didn't glue them to the forms at all, they're only helg by the rubber bands. Once they were on the forms, the keel assembly was glued to the ribs and the build board and planking commenced. When the planking was done, the stem and transome were cut free and hull lifted off the forms. The ribs between the ribs were added. The drawings of Constellation's boat didn't show anything more than their lines. I had little information as to their interior and hardware details. For the launch, I did know she carried a 12 pound boat howitzer and some information on that which gave me a little more about the boat's interior. Using Ivan as a guide (He's a 1:35 scale WWII Russian sailor and the model's first of some 30-40 eventual crewmen) I determined there needed to be a deck in the boat so that went in, but first I painted the bilges of the boat as I'd never be able to get in there after the deck went on. The launch was coppered. I used peel-and-stick aluminum duct tape to "copper" the bottom, and painted it copper. I have a 1:36 scale British frigate in the works, and this is how I intend to "copper" her as it's less than 1/4 the cost of Constellation's real copper. The launch has special tracks and rails in her for handling the gun. The gun can be shifted fore and aft, and the field carriage can be tossed in the sheets, and rolled forward on tracks of it's own for taking ashore. We're still a long way from Higgins boats here folks. 😉 There's more details to add, to boat boats; hardware, water casks, thole pins, oars, sails, etc etc etc. There's also 4 more boats to build; the 2nd cutter, whaleboat, and two quarter-boats just alike.

Ship's Boats by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 19 days ago
Building a model ship often means building several models because most ships have boats. Constellation had six. My method for building boats is nearly the same for building larger hulls and real boats - planks over forms. I have a 1:12th scale drawing of Constellation's boat's in particular from the National Archives. They not only printed me a copy, but gave me a .tif image which I easily re-scaled to 1:36. I reproduced the lines as forms extended to a baseline so the boat could be built upside down. I drew each boat's patterns and arraged each to fit on a sheet of copy paper. I print this on a full sheet label so I can rough cut them, stick them on the form material, and then cut the forms. I had a few sheets of 1/8" balsa sheet and that's what I cut the forms from. A pine plank was used for the building-board, and marked where each station would go, then the forms were glued on making sure each was 90° to the form and square to the center-line. A note on the build-board, it doesn't have to be as wide as the boat, and should, in fact, be narrower. Then you can access inside the sheer and planking and removing the boat from the forms will be much easier. A small plank of 3/4" stock will let you get rubber bands completely around the model, and it will also fit in a vice which is very convenient. The edges of the forms are shaped so the planks will lie flat on the surface, and not teeter on the corners. Using balsa makes this easy work, though you have to be careful not to snap them off the build board. I started with the ship's 1st cutter, which is a lap-strake, or clinker-built boat. (Only the launch is carvel planked) It's frames are 1/16" thick bass strips 3/32" wide. Each frame is dipped in ammonia and bent over it's form. I put a dab of glue at the ends that would eventually be cut off to hold it to the form, but for the frames on the wine-glass and hollow forms at the ends I used rubber bands to pull them into shape. Part of the reasoning behind using balsa for the forms is if anything gets glued that shouldn't, it's the form and not the model that will give-way first. The stem, stern-post, and keel are 1/16" bass, assembled together while flat. First the top corners of the keel were planed off to make a sort of rabbet. The transom is also bass as it stays in the boat. The transom is cut taller to reach the build-board, and partially cut at what will be it's top to make it easier when it's time to detach the boat. It's glued to the stern post and the build-board, the keel is glued to each frame, and the stem is glued to the build-board. This pretty much forms the rigid skeleton of the boat. There's two ways to represent lapstrake planking on so small a model. One way is to sand each plank so it's half as thick at it's top edge as its bottom. The planks are butted on the boat, thick against thin, giving the impression of overlapped planks. I chose to actually overlap the planks because the inside of the boat is open to view. Since each plank of a lapstrake boat overlaps the one below it, each plank has to be spieled, or shaped to fit, and the boat must be planked from the keel to the sheer. I divide the length of the widest frame from the keel to the sheer into the number of planks I want, then divide the lengths of the stem and the stern by this number. You'll find the planks will get narrow forward, and flare wider back aft. You may have to experiment a bit with the number of planks so maintain at least 2 scale inches forward and not more than 5 scale inches aft, or the planking will look nonsensical and out-of-scale. I planked the cutter in 1/32" thick bass. The first planks are the garboards, next to the keel. The next plank I places a strip of card along side and used a piece of plank against the edge of the wood plank to mark the card. The marks are actually the bottom edge of the plank. Each plank is shaped on it's bottom edge to the plank before, and it's top edge is straight. Then I dip it in ammonia and clamp it in place, where "clamps" are rubber bands, blocks of wood, pins, clothes pins, whatever works. Again, a narrow build-board allows the rubber bands to pull in as you reach the sheer rather than pulling them away from the boat. Once your brain gets wrapped around spieling, the planking will move along. But don't try to do too much too fast or you'll just get frustrated and ruin everything. Take lots of breaks. The planks need to be sanded thinner at their ends, almost to nothing, depending how much of a rabbit was cut into the stem. At the stern they run right off the transom and are cut flush. You can notch the transom into step for each plank to fit into, of fill the little gaps where they overlap with putty later. Since they're getting painted, I used putty. When the planking is done up to the sheer, it's best to add rub rails and strakes while the boat's still on the forms. I then finished the cut in the transom, cut off the stem near the build-board, and nipped off each frame where it was glued to the form. Then carefully lift the boat off the forms. Some form may have come off with it, and some spots may need to be reglued. I installed frames between each of the ones the boat was built on, putting a frame about every scale foot. Seat clamps, floor boards, seats, oar notches, lifting eyes, mast steps, etc, are all added bit-by-bit. before you know it, you've got another model boat. I'll get into the launch next.

Proceedings so far by Alan999 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 22 days ago
Thanks Wayne.That will help me a lot with filling in the interior of the Rica. What I have picked up are about ten one inch model China teddy bears playing instruments who will sit in the Rica. If you blow up my profile picture you will see figures and a bar on board. It gives my boats character and the Spainiards here love them. Buenos dias Alan

Mersea island boat by philpjuk Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 22 days ago
A model of boats which seem common on mersea island.Does anyone know anything about them?.

As of Summer 2017... by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 22 days ago
After the sail, I added some hardware to the spars, namely jackstays. I also ordered some aircraft plywood and used it to make new winch drums. These are sized to my current plan of only bracing the tops'l yards. Hopefully, this is the last set I'll have to make. Seeing into the dark interior of the hull can be a pain, more so the brighter it is outside. Mark got some red LEDs to light up the dash of his old pick-up (ute for my Assie friends) and gave me a left-over section. It requires a 12 volt supply (I'm running 6) and red doesn't really help in daylight, but I like the idea. If I can find a white LED strip that'll run on 6 volts, this will definitely get put in. The stern also had folding bulwarks like the bow, but that wrapped all the way around. On the real ship these were replace with a fixed bulwark except for a couple of panels that allowed access to the stern boat. By the time the ship came to Baltimore in 1955, these too were gone, with all their hardware. Again, I'm not making them functional, and decided to built these on the model rather than as separate pieces like on the bow. The hinges are represented inboard by card stock and brass eyes. The barrel portion of the hinges outboard at the bottom of each panel will be a little section of 1/16" wood dowel. The forward bulwarks were epoxied in place and the support rods were installed all around. The tops are raw because they all get a bright cap rail (varnished natural wood) and I'll put that on when it won't get messed up with paint or glue. A friend sent me a box of stuff, among which was a nive little cat face perfect for my catheads. Only having one, I was going to cast a pair in resin. But I'm out of casting resin and epoxy glue didn't set up in a way I liked, so we'll come back to that. The tops'l yards on the ship are hinged iron bands, line with wood staves. I wanted to replicate that functionality not only because that's what the ship has, but because it would allow me to take them off the mast without unrigging half the ship. I cut some heavy copper I use for everything and bent it into two half circles; soldiered brass tubing to the ends, and sawed out the notches with a jewelers saw. If only it had been that easy. Soldiering here tended to un-soldier there, cold soldier joints wouldn't hold. I gave up in frustration. I changed the gun carriages based on some research I did, but I'll post separate entries dealing with them and the ship's boats. I went looking for information on soldiering little things, and took another whack at the parrels. This time it worked out much better. I reused the copper band and brass tubing for the main and made the fore the same way. I still have to make the mizzen tops'l yard parrel, but my soldiering has gotten much much better. Last May ('17) I took the boat to the Baltimore Port Expo for National Maritime Day again, surrounded by members of our newly formed White Rocks Model Boat Club. I didn't manage to get her controls set-up in time, so she didn't go in the pool, but sat on her cart and looked pretty. I put her courses and trys'ls on her for this. The trys'ls won't be used when she sails, but can be set for static displays. The courses will get used, but I'll be able to buntl them up as shown to reduce sail. Also to reduce sail, the t'gallants and royals will be easily removable, or replaceable, as the case may be, depending on what wind there is. That pretty much brings us up to date as of July 2017. I'll post something about the boats and guns in a bit, as well as any other progress that's made. There's far more detail, images, and notes at my website on this, and the other models I'm working on at: http://todd.mainecav.org/model/ There's a few items I skimmed, or skipped over, like her signal flags, that are covered in detail there; like the day she was almost dismasted by the garage door.

Model Engineer December 1962 by AllenA Commander   Posted: 29 days ago
I wonder if this young man still has his passion for model boats.. He is Charles Martin of Walton on Thames giving a final check to to his tug before launching it on an indoor pool at the Model Engineer Exhibition in 1962. It says in the write up that boys and girls can see radio controlled models demonstrated. I guess most boys and girls now own one. Charles must be about my age and I hope he is well and still sails regularly.

what fittings for a plane prop by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Sonar My airboat was a plastic hull and top from Mobile Marine. I added my own top details and use a 2228 brushless with a cut down 10" prop. Cheap 30amp Chinese ESC and 11.1v Lipo. This is the larger version there is a smaller version also. I am attaching some pics of mine and a fellow club members model Hope this helps. Drones are a whole new ball game but usually come as a complete ready to fly set. If you are thinking of pics of your boats on the water you will need to spend about £300 to get a good basic but reliable drone. Dave

what fittings for a plane prop by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Sonar If you are buying a motor and prop together chances are all the fittings will be provided. You mention an ad so are you buying a model plane? If so a suitable motor and prop should be suggested. As an ex flyer this can be difficult to get right and the overall weight plays a big part in your choice. If it's too heavy it will fly like a brick so motor prop and battery need to be chosen to suit the type of plane. Just like boats some are fast and others slow and the prop needs to be right for the plane. If you have decided on a particular model it would help to know what it is, please? Dave