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>> Home > Tags > model show

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Decks by Gdaynorm Lieutenant   Posted: 8 days ago
Hi Doug, I am beginning to think I will have to make her a generic of Illustrious! I originally intended my model to be as she was in 1942/3. She had so many modifications I am getting lost. My only drawing is one by Norman Ough, from the Great Britain Trust. It has proved to be rather inaccurate. Usually I get drawings from Greenwich, but for some reason they were unable to this time. Maybe just as well as from all the pics I have seen she was probably never as designed. I made the Hull from those drawings, and have had to make alterations to agree with photos! The turrets I had already realized I must alter. Not too great a problem. Just remake the actual turrets but barrels okay. According to my drawing there were two multiple Pom poms abaft the funnel, one one deck below the base of the funnel and the other at flight deck level and two forward of the island, one at flight deck level. I have all the Pom Pom units eight barrelled. Your pic taken from port side forward I was taken in the Pacific I think, as she has the damage to the bridge from kamikaze hit. I'll take a pic tomorrow showing my model as she is now see what you think. Best till then Norm

seeking help and advice by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
Hi and welcome to the site. Yachts are not the easiest of models to renovate as over the years the control and sailing methods have evolved quite dramatically. The map shows you appear to be located in the Torquay area and I suggest you look in this sites Model Boat Clubs section and find a local club near to your location. Present your self at one of their sailing days and ask them if they would be prepared to help. Hopefully a member on this site who is local to your area may be able to help. I am too far away in Sandbach. Sounds like a nice yacht, are you able to post any pictures? Dave

Re Boat Harbour entries by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
You beat me to mentioning this, Doug You are quite correct the Boat Harbour section of the Forum is for members to show their finished models as well as give details of the power set up etc. A picture is really needed to show off the model in all its glory. If you are able to posts in the Build Blog section are very welcome and do produce encouraging and helpful responses from members, who also benefit from seeing how others tackle their builds. There are other specific sections where members can post to share experiences or seek help for specific topics. Some members use Tablets or Mobile devices to view and it could be Stephen may need to make it easier for these users to access the relevant sections and post pictures. All posts are welcome but pictures do add greatly to the impact, and I suggest that any member who has a problem posting, sends Fireboat, Stephen a pm so he can address the issue. happy building and posting Dave

arun 54 by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
Hi Phil Join the Lifeboats Enthusiasts socy or visit their stand at most large model shows. They have an extensive collection of photos of all lifeboat types. There are different types of Arun so I suggest you Google to make sure you build the correct cabin for your hull. There are also dedicated web sites for Lifeboats and Mayhem also have some good build blogs Dave

Sea Queen refurbishment by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 23 days ago
I have always embraced new technology and agree some of the older skillsets are fast disappearing as it is now possible to design and build almost anything from an electronic gizmo. I embrace these new techniques and have delved into 3d CAD and printers and can now make most of the bits I need. I started like many born just after the war with plastic kits followed by balsa and tissue planes, model trains, cars, boats then into electronics and early RC. I get great pleasure from the building either scratch or kit but I do worry that many prefer to just buy the finished product. I still have my IC engines and planes from my flying days but for all but the fast racers, brushless more than meets the power requirements for our scale models, but I don't deny or object to the many who still enjoy IC and have access to permitted venues. Battery power has improved over the years and Lithium batteries are capable of delivering massive power at little weight. Provided they are handled and treated correctly they are safe to use but rather like fireworks incorrect handling can be unpredictable and dangerous. This refurbishment really goes back to basics and will result in a model being restored and enjoyed for many years and Colin has certainly shown us some new techniques. I doubt if some of the off the shelf newer models will survive quite so long. Dave

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Well Chris I have used this method on various models over the last 50+years and not had one delaminate. I prefer this method for repairs to old boats that do a lot of miles travelling to and from shows in my trailer, as a lot of my vintage boats don't get to sail very often and live in my trailer all year round so need protection from damp air, especially ones made of paper mache or card. The exteriors are coated with eezikote and .8 gsm glass cloth. This is very good protection for balsa and other soft hulls, including polystyrene packing boxes that I used for barges and narrow boats.

Sea Queen refurbishment by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Hi Doug Resin is heavy and applying by coating the inside of a boat will if the wood is porous absorb lots and greatly increase the weight. The thinner it is the more it will be absorbed. Layup resin is of a similar consistency to liquid brushing paint (not the gel type). It goes more pourable as the temperature increases. It is much thinner than the Isopon resin sold in many car repair packs. Adding styrene will thin the mixture allowing it to penetrate the glass cloth or matting. It is worked well into the mat to keep the weight to a minimum and any excess is mopped up with paper towels. After several coats the fibreglass will be formed and dries rock hard over a couple of days if the correct temperature is maintained. High temps will reduce the time but will be more difficult to work with as the gel stage will happen much quicker. Sorry to rabbit on a bit but I am trying to warn you that you may end up with a very heavy model if you do not use sparingly. If you can get the consistency similar to yacht varnish you can, like me, paint inside the boat including the underside of the deck. Paint out any runs and remove any excess with paper towels. You really only need a very thin coating. If you need to add strength then use some cloth or matting and work the resin well in and mop off any excess with paper towels. If you want to use your brushes and mixing pots again Acetone is the best cleaner but do keep it away from the resin. Both your alternatives would work just as well. It must be Summertime as we keep having rain showers! Cheers Dave

White lines by Rookysailor Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 28 days ago
Hi Alan, I bought mine at a model engineering show, a pinstriping set by 'BEUGLER' a USA company. My kit has three sizes of pinstrip,1/16,1/8 and 3/32, they have a wide selection of sizes, try them on the website, not cheap but good quality. Peter

What Gun? by Rookysailor Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Steve, If you are having problems sourcing or making the gun, try a guy called 'Mike McGuinn Guns', he will have a stand at the Haydock model boat show in August, he carries a lot of different guns, or if he hasn't got the one you require, he will make it for you, a very talented man. cheers Peter

Jet Sprint Boat by Rod Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Wayne Can't have that lol Fitted engine and currently wiring up all the controls Has taken a bit longer than I thought because of my other projects like finishing Sovereign of the Seas and preparing RC Beaver for flight oh and trying to get a bit of oil painting finished off Who says retirement is boring lol I just keep running out of time not enough hours in the day We have a national model boat show on over labour weekend in October so I hope to have the jet finished by then but have to do some R and M on the Corvette and Amara tug steam engines before then as well Have posted latest pictures Cheers

Internet-wide day of action to Save Net Neutrality by Fireboat Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi All, This is not directly Model Boats related and more for members living in the US at the moment, but it does affect this website in some part and could become a more global issue in the longer term. For those living in the US I do urge you to visit the link below and sign the petition to stop your Internet Service Providers having the ability to control the speeds of websites you visit. Today is in an internet-wide day of action to save net neutrality. https://www.battleforthenet.com/july12 If Internet Service Providers get their way, websites like this could be censored, slowed down, blocked, or forced to charge extra fees. It would be the end of the open web. Please help stop them and keep the internet open, fast and equal for all. Vote for an open and fair internet. Check out the press coverage here: https://www.fightforthefuture.org/news/2017-07-10-largest-we... http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-trending-40494909 How does this affect me? * In the US, the FCC will begin to allow ISP's to control what you see & do online in the next 60 days. This includes creating fast lanes for websites who pay and slow lanes for the rest. * In the EU, rules still require that all internet traffic has to be treated equally, without blocking or slowing down certain data... for now... If you don't agree with ISPs blocking and slowing down websites, or you don't agree with paying more for faster connections to certain services, then please show your support and help spread the word. Although this is primarily affecting the FCC laws in the US, the petition is not limited to US residents and in time will come to affect us all. The internet should be fast and equal. Thank you for showing your support and helping small websites like this receive equal rights to a fast internet. Model Boats Website Team

Voyager of the Seas cruise ship [Filmed in UltraHD/4K] by Dom of Essential RC Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
This was at a temporary pool at the Wings & Wheels Model Spectacular Show.

Voyager of the Seas cruise ship [Filmed in UltraHD/4K] by Dom of Essential RC Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
This stunning model was exhibited at Wings & Wheels Model Spectacular Show. The level of detail on this model is amazing and at distance you would not know the difference from the real cruise ship that takes paying passengers to Europe, Mediterranean, Caribbean, and Asia. MS Voyager of the Seas is the lead ship of the Voyager-class of cruise ships operated by Royal Caribbean International.  Length: 311 m Capacity: 3,138 passengers Yard number: 1344 Cost: US$650 million Tonnage: 138,194 GT; 108,654 NT; 11,132 DWT Crew: 1,181 crew

Best Tx systems for boats by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Nick Yes Boatshed is spot on regarding 35Mhz, strictly for flying machines. If you are buying new then 2.4Ghz is the best way to go providing your model is on the surface, if it's a submersible then you need to use 40Mhz or 27Mhz as 2.4Ghz radio waves will not penetrate the water. There are many flavours of 2.4Ghz and they are not usually compatible with other systems even from the same manufacturer. If you have a local model shop or can attend a show then you can see and test what is available. You will also be able to get support should the equipment not work correctly. If you intend to have several models and want a rx in each to use with the one Tx then it s wise to see if single Rx can be bought and the cost, some can be expensive. Dave

The Big Heavy Model Boat Launching Blues by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Fully set up, I'm guessing Constellation weights between 100 and 110 pounds (I haven't had the opportunity the get an accurate measurement yet). Taking her to events with pools requires lifting her into the pool. I haven't figured out a way to do that easily, or safely, or more importantly, alone. I built her to sail in open water, so the 2 or three times I have to ask for help at a pool isn't a big deal. I'm sure that most of the time I'll be launching her at a ramp or shoreline, and that I'll need to move her from the parking area to the shoreline, however far that may be. There's times I may be faced with a bulkhead, but like the pool, there's no easy fix for that with a model this size. My first plan was a hand-truck set-up like the picture of my friend Ray from RCGroups, and his SC&H model of Surprise, a very similarly sized model to mine. The hand-truck is plastic and the cradle is wood, and you can see it's pretty bulky to hold a 100 pound model. Ray said his issue with it was it floated. When launching he had to push it down to get the model clear, and when retrieving he had to hold on to it or it would fall over, while trying get hold of a big model with spars sticking out everywhere. If the water was choppy or boaters were making wakes, it was that much more difficult. He also didn't like that he had to go into knee-deep water, at least. Dan, also from RCGroups, and the fellow that developed the sliding-brace-winch, has an SC&H brig he's modeled as the US brig Syren. It also came with the same hand-truck Ray's Surprise did. Dan wasn't all that enamored with it either. He pointed out how when you lean it back to move the model, it put you in among the rigging risking damage or even injury. Dan altered his hand-truck into a cart and has not looked back. In my mind, it's a boat. I have a 16 foot sailboat, and to move it, and launch it, I use a boat-trailer, so it would make sense to make a boat-trailer for the model. I scribbled an idea on paper, but then turned to some old 3D modeling software so I could see it better. My model has a 4 foot long ballast tube bolted to the keel. So I figured a U shaped channel to cradle that tube and support the model would be the basis of the cart. While Dan's cart has worked great for him, I didn't care for his 3-wheeled arrangement. Like an actual boat trailer, I opted for a single axle right under the model. I figured this would be more easily maneuvered and handle terrain a little better. I figured on making the cart from angle steel I dould bolt together. I over-designed the thing a bit, drawing a framework that would cradle the model that the more I looked at, the less I thought I needed. Going back to my real boat trailer, It just had center support and a pair of carpet cover skids (bunkers) to hold the boat up-right. Simple is always the best approach - and I had just the right material to build this cart from - a steel bed-frame. This L-angled steel had the strength to easily carry the model while using a minimum of material, and it certainly wasn't going to float! Two girders would form a U shaped channel to cradle the ballast tube. I figured a rod axle would need support or it could bend with a 100 pound model bouncing on it, a third angle would be set across for the axle. A couple of upright posts with padding would hold the model upright. Nearly all the weight of the model rests in the channel, so there's not a lot of strain on the uprights. I didn't have a cutting wheel so tried cutting the bed frame with a reciprocating saw. Bed frame steel is hard, it ate both blades, and two more I bought before finally getting the three main pieces cut, though I had no trouble drilling it. I used the u-bolt portion of a set of wire-clamps to hold the axle. A bit of flat steel to brace the axle so it wouldn't try to twist. It's all held together with nuts and bolts. I wanted short pieces of steel for and aft to hold the loose ends of the channel, but I wasn't gonna try to cut that stuff again, so I just used some scrap 2x4. To hold the handle I tried mounting a wood block with a hole forward, but then I remembered I had a flag-pole mount from when I replaced a rotten post on the porch. It took some searching, but I found it and screwed it on. The wheels are shopping cart wheels bought new from Ace Hardware online for about $5 each. I looked into inflatable wheels to give a softer ride, but they were too expensive for me. I watch the local thrift shops though, and if something shows up with nice wheels, I'll grab it. A fender washer goes on the axle first, so the wheel doesn't rub against the axle support; then the wheel, another washer, and a hitch-pin holds it all on. I can pull the hitch pins and remove the wheels making it easier to stow the cart. The uprights are simple 3/4" pine with some pipe insulation for padding (as opposed to tennis balls in the 3D model). They're bolted to the axle support, but I want to alter that a little so they can be folded in to make the cart flatter for transport. The handle is an old wood closet pole I've had for a long time. A bit too old it would turn out, but that's a later story. I painted it white for visibility as it also serves as a guard to protect the model's bowsprit from cell-phone wielding idiots that seem to be the most common form of life on this planet now. I painted the cart blue, because it wasn't black, white, or red; the other colors I had. Unfortunately, I wasn't ready in time to the museum event, and didn't go, but I wanted to sail the model before it got cold, and see if this thing worked.