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>> Home > Tags > model show

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MODEL ENGINEERING and MODELLING EXHIBITION 2018 by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
A really well attended show over 3 days there were lots of stalls selling mostly tooling type products but a good few boat related parts as well. There were lots of steam related stalls serving the model traction engine and steam train community, however the show of boat clubs was very disappointing (only 3) anybody know why? Still I had a great day and spent loads of money.

Winches by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
Hi Norm, as far as I can make out Dreadnought had the same steel chain 'runways'. All manufacturers versions of the model show them as well. Re: 14pdr AA guns. Some pics attached, including fwd turret. 1. Fwd turret 2. 'X' turret 3. Mid & Aft turret. 4. Stern view, Portsmouth dry dock 1916. Hope these help, cheers Doug 😎 PS: you might find this useful! From the 'Know Your Ship' series. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IHYXyOzPYlo The model pic is from Trumpeter I think.

Winches by Gdaynorm Commander   Posted: 16 days ago
Hi Doug, What a beautiful model. Whose? Keep seeing things differently. The 14pdr gune set up on the main turrets on that model seems a bit different from the photo I have of a rear turret. I will stay with what I have done and say a prayer or three. Have started on anchors, see pic. The shot you gave me of the bow shows the ab nchors very well. They were huge! Don't look too closely at my pic. There is all sorts of cleaning up to do! I am surprised the anchor chains seem to be hauled across the deck planking. Nelson had steel runways for the chains to run across.

Getting ready by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 23 days ago
The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum moved their Model Boat Expo back to May and I'm getting Constellation ready to sail. It's a tradition now that I have some progress to show each time she sails, so this time I want to set the courses. Since her last sail the aft bulwark was added and new winch drums made, and a wedge added to the cart to keep her from sliding back. Putting her on and off her ballast was a pain by myself, so I ground off the threads on the rods for about a centimeter so they act like pins and hold the boat in place while I thread in the other rod. That little hack was much simpler than figuring out some sort of cradle to fit on the cart. I looked at all sorts of ways to control the courses, and the simplest method was sort of a yard at the bottom, but one that wasn't obvious. I used a length of vinyl coated clothes hanger and sew pocket onto the clews on the backside of the sails. In the center of the foot, I sewed a sleeve. The rod goes through the sleeve and onto the pockets. If I need to reduce sail, I can easily pull out the rods and bunt up the sail. I also figured I'll set the two gaff-headed Spencer sails. So far I sewed hoops on the forward one. Their a line on it to brail it up if I need to lose it. The t'gallants and royals will get hooks on the halyards, and some sort of easy release on their sheets, so I can take them off, yard and all, if it's too windy. If need be, I should be able to brail up the spencers, bunt up the courses, and remove the t'gallants and royals all in just a few minutes, and have her down to just tops'ls, spanker, and jibs. If THAT's too much sail, well, then it's just too windy to sail. Hopefully I'll get to sail her with all 17 sails set! The other bit of "progress" for this sail will be to use both winches. Previously I used one winch to control the main corse yard, and the fore and mizzen were slaved to it. Last time I controlled the fore tops'l yard and slaved the main and mizzen to the fore. This time the main and mizzen tops'l yard will be controlled together on their own winch, and the fore tops'l yard will be controlled separately on it's own winch. This way, when I come-about or tack, I can back the fore against the wind to push the bow across. So, I was looking at images of the real ship to refresh my memory of how the main and mizzen brace were led when I noticed the main tops'l brace was anchored in the rig in one place when sail was set, and another place without sails. Looking around I found there was some sort of ring or band that slide up and down the mizzen topmast pushed by the tops'l yard parrel when it was raised and lowered to set or take in sail. I'd never noticed that sort of thing before, but looking at images of ship contemporary to Constellation, I found it was actually pretty common place, and I even saw it done on a few British ships of the 1850's and later. Always learning something new.

Northern Model Boat Show Doncaster 2018 by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Not sure why its done this, it show correct in the calendar as I typed it in but it is 2nd and 3rd but can't seem to alter it

Northern Model Boat Show Doncaster 2018 by dragon Captain   Posted: 1 month ago
Maybe your dates are a bit out cheers

Northern Model Boat Show Doncaster 2018 by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hosted By CADMA Adults £5 Children under 16 £2

H.M.S. BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Just to clarify. Shipping was only 7 days to Canada, manufacture slightly longer. Examined the hull closely and was pleased. It is dimensionally accurate and robust, but light. It had also been reinforced in strategic areas and trimmed to the correct deck line. My many questions to Christian Sheppard – Capurro of MTBHulls were quickly and knowledgeably answered. A company I would recommend others. Reviewing the build blogs and U Tube videos of the both the Brave and Perkasa models, shows most use either single or twin screws. The original vessel had a triple screw contra - rotating layout. Experience from others suggests the third screw just adds weight and complexity, but little to the performance. Nevertheless, it was how the Braves were built, so that was how it would be. Christian gave several suggestions for other modelers who have built this vessel. Contacted them and was readily provided with information and advice. The finished weight of this model is important and a target of around 6 lbs recommended for a 1:32 scale version. This is to achieve the potential performance. Plans for drivetrain are 3 x 2835 4500kVa brushless motors, direct driving 3 x scale 3 blade 30mm screws. Decided use a single Li-Po battery for the best performance with minimum weight. It was suggested three batteries, each powering a single motor would be the best layout. After some research, concluded this would introduce a weight penalty and was discounted. There are various ideas for the best drivetrain. Unfortunately none for triple screws. Decided the best approach would be to fit the bare hull out as planned, then try it. Leaving all the finishing features for later. A contact in Australia had already done this using a single screw layout and kindly sent pictures of his hull layout and then under test. Very informative. The positions of the rudders, propellers and shafts are established by the scale dimensions and were permanently installed. Everything else was to be temporarily fitted, so it could be moved or replaced if necessary.

HMS HOOD by Trumpeter by cormorant Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
For those of you who have never built a Trumpeter kit, I can strongly recommend it. Although Hood is 1/200 scale, the detail is fantastic and an awful lot is fitted into the 1.2m length of the model. I think a wooden deck is a must, together with an upgrade kit for the guns, giving them metal barrels etc. I'm not sure if the more expensive upgrades are worth it as there is so much provided in the kit, including a lot of photo etch. I tried to mechanise the main turrets but found it beyond my skills, so I am now concentrating on the finer detail. I have at last managed to obtain the 2kg of lead which I estimate is required for ballast. (I calculated this very scientifically by floating the hull in the bath and using a 1.5kg jar of frankfurters). Sea trials are planned for the middle of next week. The attached images show progress so far.

Leicester boating water. by glyn44 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Colin, I’m in Leicester. I think that the boating like is only used for special model shows/occasions. I fairly certain that it is not used by any club, on a regular basis. Yes, the school is still on Melton Rd, now an academy of course. Certainly much larger than it used to be.

1-35 scale S100 schennllboot blog by teejay Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi all this is my first blog, last year I post my intention to do a project about an RAF D boat that my Father served on and as a precursor to that build That I was going to do this S/E boat as the hull design is shared buy both, and as plastic kit modeller the kit great the first stage was to put together the decks and superstructure as normal, with the exception of all the bits that would be easily broken as most kit aircraft modellers aerials and guns tend to brake ,so long ago I got into the habit of making these out brass rod or bar using a mini drill and a set of needle files, holding the drill in my left hand and the files in my right, when started this I saw the number of stanches I needed so I came across this little beauty a mini bead lathe it is a great bit of kit and not expensive less than £50 and plenty of types and accessories available so all the stanches aerials hand rails, gun rails, horn, and some of the components for the rudder and tiller were made on this lathe. so good time being had in my first radio control boat . the next post will show all the parts for the rudder/tiller setup

Motor Mounted! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Sorry Ed, I was pullin' your leg a little 😉 Date of Manufacture and 'On Time' or 'Operating Hours' are terms I remember from my time working on naval ships and other MIL STD equipment! But your question is nevertheless relevant to brushed motors in models👍Basically I wouldn't expect a max current of 2A to stress the brushes of your motor very much. And for that price I would expect that the commutator would be well machined thus minimising the brush wear as it switches from one segment to the next. I trust that you got the quality that you paid for😉 Therefore you should get many hundreds of hours of use out of your brushes! Simply check now n again how much 'meat' they have left and if the commutator shows signs of wear, burning or grooves from the brushes. Or do you want me to do a MIL-HDBK-217F Reliability and MTBF Analysis? 😲 He He, ask Dumas if they did one, that'll throw 'em 😁 Cheers Doug 😎

Cabin roof mechanism by BOATSHED Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
It never ceases to amaze me on the amount of detail some modelers are prepared to go to on their model builds. I wish I had the resources and inclination to do all of this. with what is shown here and all the work robob put into his build. I wish I had a lathe and all the other tooling that some have. I just love to see these build blogs. keep showing the progress of this one please. I does give idea's and inspiration.

Devil in the detail! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I'm with you there Skydive 👍What Boatshed means is the part of the rudder in front of the stock. Thinks: are you building an Offshore Power Boat or a scale Lifeboat? If the former then follow Boatshed's recommendation. If the latter and the rudder is 'scale' then leave it alone. Any braking effect, which usually is only significant in a fast racing boat model or other fast planing types, can be diminished by reducing the rudder servo throw at the TX. One should also consider how the original behaved, maybe they did 'dig in' maybe not. There has to be a reason why such rudders were developed, and surely not just to annoy modellers 😁 One more minor point that struck me - Ouch 😭 Your prop struts! "not that it provides a huge amount of support but adds to the scale appearance." Even in a model they can be important. To help reduce potential whipping of the propshaft, especially if the model is overpowered. Actually in the originals they were vital, especially in larger vessels. The purpose of these struts, in larger vessels 'A' frames, is to provide support to the end of the shaft which carries the prop weighing several tons and, more important, to carry the bearing for the outer end of the shaft! Actually in the originals the shaft tube, or 'Stuffing Box' would not extend significantly beyond the hull. Thus the strut or A frame was vital for the shaft end bearing, fitted immediately in front of the prop for maximum stability. Attached pics of my HMS Belfast (sorry don't 'ave nutt'n smaller with this feature🤔) show the arrangement. Have witnessed such construction in various shipyards around the world. Last one in UK was the first T45, quite an experience! 😲 In the end she's your boat, if it feels good do it! 😉 I would leave the rudder alone if it is 'as fitted'. 👍 I make my struts and A frames from brass sheet and tube. Cheers Doug 😎 PS Stick with the brass Donnie! 👍

Calling Devon boaters. Help! by wunwinglo Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
My 95 year old uncle is a former MTB captain living in a care home in Exmouth. His brother, my late father, built a nice Vosper MTB model in the fifties that has not run since 1962. I have recently restored, upgraded and recommissioned this model and I would really like to show my uncle her running on a lake. Unfortunately, the lake at Exmouth has been filled in recently and the nearest alternative that I can find on the net is about 45 miles away which is too far for him to travel. The model is now electric and so is quiet, about 40 inches long and a fairly hot performer at full chat. If you are active in this area, I would be most grateful to be informed of any suitable closer waters and the requirements to access it. Thanks guys.