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>> Home > Tags > mtb

mtb
mtb
S 100 Schnellboot RC build by boaty Commander   Posted: 11 hours ago
I have a liking for Italeri kits myself. Built the Vosper MTB in 2011 then the PT 109 a few years later. They really perform well either with single or triple props. Both of mine have 480 brushed motors, single props, and 2s Lipo 2200mAh. Ideal for small ponds where you can maintain scale speeds and if easy on the throttle you can have a decent endurance before the battery goes flat. Boaty😁

S 100 Schnellboot RC build by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 hours ago
Hi Ron, did you ever try 3 props for comparison? If yours is the 1:35 Italeri I don't see any problem with space for 3 shafts. I have an approx 1:35 MTB currently with 2 shafts, 'as seen and bought' next season I propose to fit a 3rd motor and shaft: port and starboard for cruising, switch-in centre motor for "All ahead flank"! BTW: I have a couple of kits for the S100 "Schnellboot, otherwise known as E Boat, E for Enemy😉, one Airfix and one Revell, both 1:72. I intend to fit them with 3 motors as well - 'Plastic Magic' 😁 Motors already sourced from X-Drive, shafts will be home brew from silver steel and brass tube with sintered phosphor bronze bearings. "Nothing is impossible", I drive a Toyota 😉😉 Cheers Doug 😎

Motor size advice by Morkullen Seaman   Posted: 3 days ago
I am building the Thornicroft MTB MM337 (again) I last built one many years ago and put a small diesel engine in it at that time. However, I plan to go all electric R/C on this one and would appreciate advice as to what size, (Make /Model) type of motor could be used. Also which battery pack for the motor. Any and all suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

MTB379 by wunwinglo Lieutenant   Posted: 4 days ago
[Score: 5/10] 39" MTB379 Capable of 14mph Twin Propellors (3 Blade 45mm) Direct Drive Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) Batteries - Comments: This model was originally built by my father in the 50's for i.c. power. It was laid up in 1962 and remained inactive until two years ago. At that point, I egan recommissioning it, fitting twin brushless motors in place of the deafening single glow motor and straight-cut gears. I also added a great deal detail that my dad had never added. It performs very well nicely in this guise with the added drama of a throttle-linked digital sound system.

It's a sad day!. by wunwinglo Lieutenant   Posted: 7 days ago
I can well imagine how you feel about your i.c. models. My recent renovation/recommissioning of my late father's Vosper MTB is kind of ironic in that it last ran in 1962 when noise suddenly became an issue. Mind you, it was VERY loud. My rebuild, needless to say, was centred around brushless motors and lipo's. But I also put an excellent sound system into it as it was so quiet. The system, by Action Electronics and is nice and loud as per the full-size but it does seem ironic that I felt the need to put sound(noise) back in! I use lots of small diesels in free-flight model aircraft and still hugely enjoy getting them 'singing' and savouring the wonderful smell in the car going home afterwards!

MTB 379 by wunwinglo Lieutenant   Posted: 18 days ago
I thought that they were depth charges!

MTB 379 by reilly4 Captain   Posted: 18 days ago
It is a good thing that the realistic 15" shells splashes kept missing the MTB. 😉

MTB 379 by Donnieboy Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
It's great to see a restored model running especially when it's a boat that a family member built.Great restoration.

MTB 379 by wunwinglo Lieutenant   Posted: 20 days ago
My uncle Peter was a flotilla leader with coastal forces in the Mediterean, in the second half of WW2 . My late father, Douglas, his brother, built the pictured MTB in 1956. It ran with i.c. power until 1962, when it was mothballed. I recently restored and upgraded the model (brushless motors etc) and thought that it would be great to take the model all the way down a lake in Devon to demonstrate it for him. Not having any local knowledge, I put a request on this excellent site, asking for help from local guys and must say that the site has some wonderful subscribers who came forward with help and support, especially Keystone. He was brilliant and greatly contributed to make the visit a great success. thanks, mate. My uncle and the other members present greatly enjoyed it, though the windy, cold conditions rendered the rum tot most acceptable!! The photos are self explanatory. The tug was there as a rescue boat if required. Many thanks to all Model Boats' members who responded to my request for help.

H.M.S BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
Whilst waiting for the ice to melt, decided to make up the deck and transom flaps. The deck was made from styrene sheet, again for lightness. Made the deck beams out of square styrene sections to avoid traditional, heavy, full width bulkheads. Hoped the stiff MTBH hull would resist twisting without bulkheads. First impressions are that this is the case and when the deck is finally bonded to the hull, should be even better.. The transom flap was made from thin aluminium plate and added simulated stiffener ribs in styrene. Understand that about a 2 degree flap down inclination works best on this model. My original plan was to operate the flap using a servo with another radio channel, however once the best plane is achieved it is unlikely the flaps will need further adjustment. Unlike the real vessel, the operating weight will remain fairly constant. So, abandoned the servo idea to use adjustable bottle-screws instead. The flap angle can still be adjusted, but not in motion. These screws are much simpler, lighter and cheaper than a servo. One challenge was to make the very small hinges required for an adjustable flap. After much thinking and investigation, decided the simplest and neatest way would be to use thin, self adhesive aluminium tape, as used on forced air heating ducts. Would stick the self adhesive surface to the underside of the flap and then onto the inside face of another thin aluminium sheet, which could then be fitted to the transom using double sided tape and small screws. This seems to work so far, it also avoids drilling through holes into the transom .

Which Paint? by andyhynes Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 30 days ago
A couple of years ago i scratch built a 1/24 scale Vosper Long boat MTB 510. I spray painted the hull and super structure with Halfords white and gray primer. The Hull was given coat of Matt clear laquer Spray (Plasticote). The deck and super structure were also coated in a matt laquer spray. This product was Rustoleum Crystal Clear Matt Laquer. I have used this product before on acrylic base paints, and had no problems. Do not use on oil based paints as it will crinkle the surface. The Plasticote product i used on the Hull was fine at the time but a couple of years on the surface has become crazed. so i will have to repaint the complete hull sometime in the future. Can any one out there recommend a paint combination or product that is satisfactory, and will not craze like an old masters oil painting from the 1500s.

H.M.S. BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Thanks all for the responses. Donnieboy - have thought out the plumbing, which is simplified by using a cooling pump. See future episodes! Doug - appreciate the concern regarding the red ESC wires. Have been trying to understand the rationale behind that theory. If all ESCs share a common input voltage, i.e. from one battery, what would the connection of multiple red wires do? Can understand if there were several unique power sources, but that is not the case here. Perhaps with your electronics background you can explain. Colmar - Used the angle on the scale drawing. If it were good enough for Vosper, should be good enough for me! Think it close to 7 degrees anyway. Think short shafts with oilers should help. Have heard of bushings running dry and seizing with these high speed motors. The initial props are scale versions of the originals. Rather suspect they will not prove to be ideal. Have purchased some 2 blade racing style props for a future test. They have a much coarser pitch and are designed for high speed motors. Intend to use plastic props initially as they are cheap enough to experiment with. Perhaps others have a comments on the cavitation question?. Incidentally, this is my first high speed boat too, but there is much of information on both this web site and Model Boat Mayhem for guidance. Posting questions always generates useful information. Look widely though at all types of fast models, MTBs, RAF launches, E Boats etc. - it has all been done before!

H.M.S. BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Just to clarify. Shipping was only 7 days to Canada, manufacture slightly longer. Examined the hull closely and was pleased. It is dimensionally accurate and robust, but light. It had also been reinforced in strategic areas and trimmed to the correct deck line. My many questions to Christian Sheppard – Capurro of MTBHulls were quickly and knowledgeably answered. A company I would recommend others. Reviewing the build blogs and U Tube videos of the both the Brave and Perkasa models, shows most use either single or twin screws. The original vessel had a triple screw contra - rotating layout. Experience from others suggests the third screw just adds weight and complexity, but little to the performance. Nevertheless, it was how the Braves were built, so that was how it would be. Christian gave several suggestions for other modelers who have built this vessel. Contacted them and was readily provided with information and advice. The finished weight of this model is important and a target of around 6 lbs recommended for a 1:32 scale version. This is to achieve the potential performance. Plans for drivetrain are 3 x 2835 4500kVa brushless motors, direct driving 3 x scale 3 blade 30mm screws. Decided use a single Li-Po battery for the best performance with minimum weight. It was suggested three batteries, each powering a single motor would be the best layout. After some research, concluded this would introduce a weight penalty and was discounted. There are various ideas for the best drivetrain. Unfortunately none for triple screws. Decided the best approach would be to fit the bare hull out as planned, then try it. Leaving all the finishing features for later. A contact in Australia had already done this using a single screw layout and kindly sent pictures of his hull layout and then under test. Very informative. The positions of the rudders, propellers and shafts are established by the scale dimensions and were permanently installed. Everything else was to be temporarily fitted, so it could be moved or replaced if necessary.

wood glue by dennisw Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
I used it a lot at one time bet if it gets damp it goes unusable I was told that it may cause cancer. I stopped using it because there must be a better glue. I also was told was used to make rescue boats & mtb.👍

H.M.S BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Thinking of a future project and decided upon another launch type vessel. My earlier Daman 4207 project gave an interesting model with good performance. The Brave class of FPBs (Fast Patrol Boats) caught my attention. Can remember the incredible performance they offered when entering service. Only two of the class were used by the RN, although variants were used by other navies. Have decided to use proprietary Glass fibre hulls in future as they probably cost little more than building from scratch using wood and resin. They give a robust and watertight hull, but one which still requires thought to complete properly. There are several companies that offer a “Perkasa” hull, a Brave class derivative with an almost identical hull. From previous experience have decided to limit my models to 40” long, larger vessels become difficult to transport and handle. After much research considered the hull offered by MTB Hulls in Gibraltar met my requirements best. The inquiry to MTBHulls was well handled; the quotation acceptable, so placed an order. Was pleasantly surprised at the shipping costs. From the UK these often approach the cost of the hull, but from Gibraltar they are much more reasonable. Delivery only took 7 days.