Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
January 2019: 13 people
December 2018: 6 people
November 2018: 11 people
October 2018: 9 people
September 2018: 13 people
August 2018: 5 people
July 2018: 8 people
June 2018: 8 people
May 2018: 7 people
April 2018: 20 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (15)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > nails

nails
nails
Day Two Springer by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 30 days ago
Springer build log for website Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe Day 2 Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. If you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe

Rescue Vessel - Springer Tug by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 1 month ago
Void

Formidable by humelvin Seaman   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 9/10] 48"/12000g Formidable Capable of 3mph and a runtime of 50mins Single Propellor (4 Blade 65mm) Geared Powered by Lead Acid (12v) 8Amp/h Batteries - Comments: Hemmens 'Formidable' 5 years to make! Double plank on frame. First plank skin fastened with wood trenails. Scale planking. Second skin mahogany strip to Lloyds spec. 10,00 copper rivets. Was intended for Hemmens V-4 steam but chickened out so electric - V-4 now bench run only.

Search light by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
A working search light seems to be expected on this craft so here goes. Based on Robs build I purchased the lens and the LED from Maplin’s which seemed to fit the bill. The only piece that will be used is the main body that is supplied as a white metal fitting, the rest will be replaced by a brass construction, as the rest of the parts are not substantial enough to support a working unit. First, I need some 3/16 half round brass bar, the easiest way is to machine my own cutting just less than half the diameter away. The half-round bar was annealed before bending round a suitable mandrel to a half circle. I then soldered an 8BA nut on each leg to act as the swivel bearing. Next, I machined the body’s internal bore to suit the lens body and skimmed the outer rim and face, finally bore out a small recess that locates the lens in place. The two pivot holes need to be drilled and tapped 8BA, and then a drilled hole in the rear wall for the wires to exit. As the light is to be both working and rotating the base has is to be made with a centre spindle that connects to a micro servo under the roof. The connecting devise was a bit of a headache trying to make it fit in a relatively small space; I used the supplied servo arm with four legs (shortened) and then machined a mating part with pins that located in the arm that is attached to the body above deck. The LED was modified to fit in the white metal body as it has a heat sink which was too big; as others have found cutting it down didn’t affect the heat dissipation when fixed in the white metal body, this was fixed using a small amount of Milliput. Having already machined the outer flange on the body I turned up a brass-flanged ring to push fit on the body this has to have the TRI form guard added. I made this from a central pinion with three holes drilled to accept the bent brass nails; these were soft soldered in position. The TRI form was then located on top of the brass flange and again soft soldered in position At this point all the components will have to be dismantled for final finishing before being painting.

deck planks by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
On to the railings. I am using striped electrical wire. Free & easy to solder, and different sizes. The only drawback it is a little soft. The hardest job is getting it straight. This is done in vice & between fingers.( fingers not in vice) I also flatten the stanchions where rails cross. The long silver is the flagstaff at the bow, half way along the section being made. Held in a jig to solder, saw cut hold stanchions & nails stretch rails. The tape was to hold rails against stanchions. This was not needed as I pushed them down with a screwdriver as I removed the soldering iron.

54 year old Crash Tender by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
I would like first to say that this is NOT a restoration. It has always been mine and followed me around all those years, been used extensively on Oyster beds on the Essex coast and Valentine's Park in Ilford, Essex...even the great Victoria Park, of which my Granddad was a founder member. It has eaten its way through lantern batteries out of number which my Dad, who was in the business could magic from thin air. There was always a nook in the boot of the Triumph Town and Country saloon and then the Austin Westminster for another new lantern battery, which the Taycol would destroy in about 20 intermittent minutes of left, centre, right, centre from the REP single channel gear. How I wish I still had that, but it was stolen. The REP, that is, the Taycol remains, restored and cleaned and like new again waiting to go back in the boat. I finally decided I should finish it. My wife bought me a set of white metal fittings by Yeoman out of IP Engineering, so I have no excuse. Not that I need one. It has suffered a bit over that half a century, losing odd panels, but they are easily remade and replaced. First, I had to clean out the insides of the detritus and loft life of decades. Vacuuming, scraping with a pointy thing and brushing with a stiff brush, followed by more vacuuming using a clever attachment that my dear wife thought might be useful and it was, being at least a dozen stiff, but small diameter tubes poking out of the end of a nozzle. It both pokes and nudges the old dirt and dust and sucks it away. After that the old thin mahogany deck planks, my friend thought to add in the late 60s were removed and saved where salvageable as I quite like them for trim on other boats. The deck was rather brutalised with a coarse rasp and any loose nails punched back in flush or slightly below. Then some way too old, but still good, epoxy (WEST) was used to slar all over the decks and most of the insides, even some of the cabin sides. That will be finished before dark today. I can hardly believe the epoxy still works, but it does, perfectly and so is pressed into use. In this warm weather it set very quickly. I did my usual trick of squeegeeing it on into the grain with an old credit card or Gummi, which is a sample block of silicon. Styrene will also do. I use some spare 2mm stuff I was given (that guy at IP Engineering again). The roofs had already been corrected the other evening and heavily cellulose sanding sealed. The forward cabin removeable roof was unwarped by having a tight fitting diagonal piece of pear pressed in under the top skin and glued. The new hatch on that roof was made and the shape of the roof and hatch runners changed slightly, as per drawings from this site. Here are pics. of the work today. The above resinning, the remade cabin panels a new wheelhouse bulkhead and the tow hook base panel, finally a new aft cockpit rear coaming which it never had but should have. Cheers, Martin

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by pittsfieldpete Lieutenant   Posted: 8 months ago
Good morning, guys. I got the pilot house roof off of my boat by using bits of advice from both of you. I looked closely at the seam where the roof attaches & sure enough found a very fine gap. Doug: I trimmed my fingernails just yesterday so my built-in scraper/screwdriver/seam separator, i.e. thumbnail, is too short to be of use for a while. Ed: Following your lead I carefully worked an ultra-thin blade into the seam & after about 30 seconds I had the roof off without damaging a thing. Excellent! I’m impressed at how well the roof presses in place. Only the paint had “glued” the roof on. Looking at the photo you can clearly see the ceiling bulb (white wires), which is the same kind used for HO scale & larger locomotive headlights, among other things. The blue wires near my thumb (notice the neatly-trimmed thumbnail) run up to the search light on the roof. You can also see the black & red & black & green wires running to the port & starboard side lights. I think I’ll add a multi-pin connector as part of my overall upgrade plan for the tug so that I can completely remove the roof if I want to without risking damage to those fine wires. Thanks again to both of you for your helpful guidance. You’re both awesome! Pete

Port lights in place! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 months ago
Hmm! I see where you're coming from Ed, but bear in mind that matt paints have a habit of developing shiny spots wherever they are touched! 🤔 Wear and tear,servicing and cleaning etc. I would use the satin (semi-matt) paint and finish off with matt clear varnish for protection, also UV protection! 👍 I use the Lord Nelson varnish for that. http://www.krickshop.de/Products/Paints-Accessories/Paints-f... Cheers Doug 😎 PS Sorry to hear about the glue 🤔 Oh well! There's always Sellotape 😉 Or as Grandad used to say "If all else fails - use bl***y great nails" 😉

Glue by Colin H. Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 months ago
Hi Glyn, no nails should be okay, but only use tiny dots of it as it is very strong. Cheers Colin.👍

Glue by glyn44 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 11 months ago
Ah thanks Colin. I was going to try the silicone idea today, but I won’t now, thanks. I’ll go for the tape. I was also thinking, after the silicone tip, to try no nails, as I have some to hand. I’ll test some on pieces of scrap wood and see how it goes.See if it glues ok afterwards. Cheers all.

HMCS Sackville - WWII Corvette by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 months ago
Hi gord(on?), so far so good👍 For heaven sakes DON'T GIVE UP! 😲 If all else fails - use bloody great nails!! 😉 In this case perhaps a half decent brushed motor, the 'Flowers' weren't greyhounds anyway 😁 More power to your boiler, Cheers Doug 😎

2nd Gunwhale stringers by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 months ago
Now for the more difficult stringer, this one has already been steamed and set in the jig. The outer stringer has to be put on using glue only and clamps, so no nails at all since it has to shaped to the profile of the bulkheads over its entire length hopefully using a jack plane (which don’t like nails). Clamps at the ready and glue in hand and away we go,

deck planks by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
I usually use coffee stirring sticks. But at this scale far to wide. I cut 3/32" strips off a 7/8" plank. Stuck them back together with a mixture of P.V.A. & acrylic black paint. Clamping over the whole length. Next day cut down the opposite way to about 1/16 & sand to a finish. Mark in the joints & nails with a pen. The planks could be any width required, & the black joints aren't to big.

Superstructure finished! by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
I attached the plastic tube that came with the original kit with long brass nails. You need to just fit them so that you dont squash the tube. I painted the tube with a darkish red Humbrol before fitting. The fore and aft bits are the bulwarks and there is also a small rail running along the edges of the deck, but set in slightly. On the real boat they carried the stanchion bearers and acted as a foot stop. They also need to have washports to allow deck water to run off. I've attached a few pics of my Solent FYI. I agree it was not a scale model but at the time we used IC engines that required easy and large access and this was one of the more realistic models available. Many like yourself have added lots of detail and the finished result will look the part and will be a credit to you. Looking forward to seeing the finished Oxford Blue hull.

web site by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
Hi Dave, Thanks for the advice (aimed more at the non-computer guys here I guess 😉), but I was programming computers back in the 8 bit paper tape days! Due to limited storage space (kbytes not Giga or Terrabytes!🤔) I quickly learned to use it sparingly and clear the junk out after every session! Nowadays it's sadly more of a security question. ALL my possible browsers are set to clear cache, cookies, searches, sites visited etc etc on closure. At the end of each session I also use CCleanerPro (formerly CrapCleaner!) to clear out all caches, MS usage logs, temporary thumbnails Temp files, and deleted files - Waste Basket and Uncle Tom Cobbley and all!. So there can not have been anything in the browser cache - especially on the very first attempt. I agree with your last comment - my interpretation is that when McAfee looked at the site it exhibited behaviour which is classed as Suspicious! I won't be trying it again. Cheers Doug 😎 PS: i suppose I could dig out the site report, but frankly it's not worth the bother, more interesting things to do! ColourCoats paints for the PT boat and T45 as well as LifeColor cammo colours for KM and RN WW2 arrived today. Only ordered 'em yesterday 😊😊