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>> Home > Tags > paint

paint
aluminium paint
paints
spray paint
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Novice Build: Vintage Model Works 46" RAF Crash Tender by andyhynes Petty Officer   Posted: 11 hours ago
I built mine a couple of years ago. The wood is good quality and the metal fittings dont take much cleaning up. My fireboat runs of a brushless motor running of lipos batteries and performs well. I used auto paints regards the finish. and very pleased with it. It performs a good as my 49" Perkasa which runs of two brushless motors with the lipos wired in series.

The Hull Markings by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 hours ago
The paint on the hull has sufficiently hardened and needs a couple of coats of clear lacquer to protect it but before that happens I need to apply the hull markings. The waterslide decal set that was supplied with my kit was probably at least 5 years old when I bought the kit on eBay and they had deteriorated so badly that when I put the large ‘FIRE’ lettering panel in some warm water it fragmented and clearly was not usable. I called Mike Cummings at vintage Model works and explained my dilemma and he very generously agreed to supply me with a replacement set, and in addition a set of the recently available printed vinyl letters and markings that they now produce. I decided to use the vinyl set as a quick test piece with the waterslide set revealed that the white ink is not solid and therefore not completely opaque. Furthermore I could not eliminate the ‘silvering’ effect that happens on waterslide decals despite using various lotions and potions such as Humbrol Decalfix and Microsol/Microset solutions. A test piece with the vinyl lettering sheet was far more successful and when over-lacquered on the test piece the results were very acceptable. Starting with the large FIRE lettering I cut a paper template the same size as the complete word and fixed this with low tack masking tape on the hull, this paper was then outlined in more masking tape to form a window and the vertical spacing of the letters transferred to this to keep the correct spacing. Vertical strips of tape were then used as positioning guides for the letters which were individually cut and placed so that I could eliminate all but the solid white letters and give them a hard edge. Feeling very pleased with myself I removed the masking tape guides and realised to my horror that I had set the baseline of the letters far too close to the waterline and the vertical proportions were completely wrong ….disaster 😱 Feeling ashamed that I could make such a basic error I abandoned the lettering and called Mike at VMW and described my foolish error, no problem he said, I’ll send you another vinyl sheet and also some additional drawing that were missing from my kit that would help with detail finishing. My second attempt with the new vinyl sheet employed the same process but I was careful to measure, mark and check the positions (several times!) before starting. The roundel and numerals positions at the bow and the stern were carefully measured and marked using the supplied drawings and masking tape ‘guides’ used to fix their positions before application. Lastly the roman numerals that span the waterline at the bow and stern were marked, cut and individually applied. I also took the opportunity to fix in place a couple of modified 6mm portholes to replicate the aft cockpit drain outlets, in the photo is the ‘94’ waterslide decal which I later removed and replaced with vinyl when I could not eliminate the ‘silvering’ problem. A big Thank You to Mike Cummings at Vintage Model works for replacing the lettering sheets TWICE! and for the extra drawings, I call that exceptional after sales service !. Cheers Mike 👍👍 .

Feathering set up by Trillium Lieutenant   Posted: 2 days ago
A beam was needed to support the pivot for the feathering mechanism. It was made to straddle the gap between the two sponson supports. There’s even less information available about this than there was for the feathering mechanism. My second attempt was the best solution and comprised the following parts. - Two 3/8” lengths of ¼” brass angle; with a clearance hole drilled in the top flange near one end, to suit the small sheet metal screws I had on hand - A length of 1/8” x ¼” rectangular brass tube to span the gap between the sponsons. - Approx 2” length of ¼” x 0.030” thick brass strip - A ½” length of ½” wide by 0.030”thick brass strip - A 7mm length of 3/16” brass tube as a bushing for the pivot. The rectangular tube was cut to length to fit across the sponson supports and inside the paddle boxes. The two pieces of ¼” angle were soldered at right angles under the ends of the 1/8” x ¼” tube. The paddle wheel and the beam were placed in position. The paddle wheel was set up while stationary to position the paddles so that one was on bottom dead centre and vertical. The axial position of the pivot point centre was marked on the beam, and the distance below the edge of the beam measured. The top edge of the ½” square strip was intended to be flush with the top of the beam, and a 3/16” hole was drilled through the former at the pivot point centre. This was soldered to the ¼” wide brass strip, and then the 3/16” tube soldered into the hole. The drill press was used to set it at right angles to the strip for soldering. The strip was joggled, to ensure the rotating paddles cleared the support beam, and with the 3/16” tube on the side nearest the hull. The brass strip was clamped to the support beam, with the complete assembly in place, and the pivot position adjusted to give the optimum motion of the mechanism. The brass strip was soldered to the support beam, and then removed and painted.

Sweet❤️❤️❤️Heart by Grandpa Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 3 days ago
[Score: 8/10] 24"/1200g Sweet❤️❤️❤️Heart Capable of 12mph and a runtime of 30mins Single Propellor (2 Blade X Type) Geared to a Graupner (2 Blade X Type) Powered by NiMH (7.2v) Batteries - Comments: 18" of Ice covers the pond so much of the information requested must remain blank. The boat has only seen the bathtub ! No leaks. Stable and balanced. Paint is acrylic, clear-coated wood is mahogany. This is a Nor-Star Kingfisher kit with some alterations and added details. Looking forward to posting a video of the boat running on the lake in April after the ice leaves.

ELENA ROSE by Northumbrian Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
all ready to go new paint & varnished added new leather seating windscreen made from a plastic salad bowl 45mm 3 bladed brass prop 850 brushed motor powered by a 11.1 5000 mah lipo O and new cowls from the model shop 👍

The life rings. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
The white metal life rings supplied in the fittings kit not only look flat and uninteresting but more than that they weigh in at 57 grams individually and along with the rest of the metal fittings above deck will raise the centre of gravity quite a lot and may affect the roll of the hull on turns. Well that’s my theory anyway and I’m using it to justify replacing them with something lighter and more pleasing to the eye. I found some plastic ones on eBay that were roughly the same diameter for a couple of pounds each that looked ideal. The rope detail needed to be added to them to replicate the originals and this was done with some nylon cord that I superglued into slots filed into the circumference. I then wound seven turns to form the quadrants, securing each turn with a spot of glue and ensuring that the ends all arrived on what will be the underside of the rings. They were then sprayed with a couple of coats of white acrylic and the red bands brush painted. The weight of the new life ring is 19 grams, exactly one third of the metal one and it looks, to my eye, a million times better 😁 To locate them on the engine room roof I cut some 3mm plasticard wedges and superglued them in place, the actual fixing will be two small screws from the underside of the roof. The white metal ones will make ideal ballast weights if I need to make any adjustments 😉

Applying the waterline. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
I tried to find some pictures online of this without success although I do recall seeing, some time ago, a 'photo of the crew painting the waterline on the side of a lifeboat. Damned if I could find that again, anyone seen that ?

Applying the waterline. by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
I agree and it also looks wrong on my model. I used trim and cut to fit over the spray rail and it just doesn't seem right. The raised spray rail means it will only look right when viewed at exactly 90deg, any other angle and it appears un-aligned. Perhaps the solution is to not to put the trim or paint on the spray rail. I doubt if the eye would register its lack and possibly not as much as if it were present. I may try on my 34 model to see if it works

Wheel assembled by Trillium Lieutenant   Posted: 8 days ago
The paddles were cut from 0.050” styrene, the attachment points for the support arms drilled, and the support arms fitted and glued in with epoxy. The paddles and the side wheel assembly were painted black, with small pieces of masking tape over the pivot holes in the paddle support arms, where the pivot tubes were glued to them, and painted over later. When it came to assembling the parts, the sequence was as follows: - Fastened one end of the links to the inside face of the master rod (looks like a banjo); using #2-56 UNC bolts with the bolt heads on the outside face, a 4.5mm length of 1/8” brass tube as a bushing, and two #4 washers, and a #2-56 nyloc nut. - Inserted a #4-40 UNC bolt and washer in the centre of the master rod from the inside, secured it with a 5/32” brass tube bushing, lock washer and nut - Fastened the outer end of the links to the paddle arms, with the links on the outside of the paddle arms, with the bolt heads on the inside face, otherwise same as inner end of the links. The next step is to make the support for the pivot of the feathering mechanism.

Applying the waterline. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
I have used a vinyl tape made by Trimline rather than trying to paint one. Starting at the stern the tape conceals the join between the red oxide anti fouling and the black gloss sides. This is then continued to the bow but it has to cross the spray rail and this part gave me the most trouble. I ended up masking and painting the line at this point as I could not get the tape to conform to the multiple angles involved 😠 Visually it looks a bit odd and It’s far from perfect but I can’t afford to waste too much on it. Perhaps after some flatting down it will look better. If anyone has a quick, simple and accurate method of doing this I’d love to know the secret 😞

Part 2. The searchlight optics. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
Here's the fully assembled and painted searchlight. Robbob.

Kingfisher Progress by Grandpa Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 8 days ago
Trimwork being done around transom and painting of the rub railing.

Michael by Grandpa Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 16 days ago
[Score: 8/10] 18" Michael Capable of 3mph and a runtime of 30mins Single Propellor (3 Blade) Geared Powered by NiMH (7.2v) Batteries - Comments: I use two 2400 Wolf Pack battery sets one one each side of the hull to add ballast plus, B-B shot is glued in the hull for weight too. My grandson helped to build and paint it thus the vessel named Michael The boat was too fast with a direct drive so it was replaced with a 3:1 geared reduction. Runs much better more scale speed. The first motor made it look like a speed boat, which was dangerous if my grandson were to sail it.

ELENA ROSE by Northumbrian Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 18 days ago
I picked this up on ebay I am busy stripping it back to wood for a repaint job & new deck fittings

Part 2. The searchlight optics. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
The reflector that I originally used for testing came from Maplins and was not a particularly good fit and it also produced a broad diffused light, but I found another lens from the same supplier that could be adapted to fit and would produce a much narrower 10° beam. The lens body was too long to fit into the searchlight body so I 'ground down' the lens on some abrasive to a size that would fit using progressively finer grades of wet & dry paper. The lens was then polished with some cutting/polishing compound to restore the optical clarity.🤓 The original and modified lenses are shown in the 'photos. The lens now fits perfectly into the searchlight body and produces a much narrower and focussed beam of light. I cut and shaped a piece of 1mm clear perspex to form a protective cover over the lens to hold it in the searchlight body and make it waterproof. The searchlight on the real boat has a 'tri-form’ protective cage with a centre boss (my description, there’s probably a proper name for it ), this part is not supplied in the white metal kit so I constructed one from some 22mm copper plumbing pipe, some brass pins and a hand turned and drilled brass rod for the centre boss. These parts were ‘soft soldered’ together as silver soldering would be quite difficult because of the different heat gradients. Before final assembly I will paint the parts gloss grey and secure the optical and protective lens with some canopy glue which will form a flexible seal and won’t ’fog’ the lens as superglue would, and then epoxy the 'tri-form' cage to the front. Hopefully the end result will be well worth the effort and do justice to my brother’s lathe skills!😎