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>> Home > Tags > parts

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Painting by MouldBuilder Admiral   Posted: 18 hours ago
I must admit that the painting process is not my favourite. It takes so long and time is always at a premium due to work commitments. I rush it a bit so that the build can continue. I fitted all of the windows into the deck structure and covered them with the low tack film. I then primed, two coats, painted, two coats followed by two coats of lacquer. I am quite pleased with the results even though it is not perfect. I decided not to fit the deck until all of the electronics, including the ESC, battery and receiver had been installed. This is because one of the big problems with this model is the lack of room to work in once the deck is in place. Another problem I encountered was the fitting of the tiller cranks onto the rudders. If the instructions are followed, it is almost impossible the adjust or remove them once the deck has been fitted. I solved the problem by reversing the cranks and bending the connecting wire to miss a bulkhead support. The screws can now be reached from the deck opening. I have now completed the majority of the painting and have started to assemble the remaining parts. Currently I am doing the wiring of the lighting and making a couple of circuit boards. There are a lot of wires involved so to reduce the amount I have decided to us e a common negative. (Cannot remember what this is called right now). There are still a lot of wires and they are mostly coming out from the cabin structure. I have decided to introduce some nine pin connectors to make cabin removal a lot easier. This is quite a big job and will take a little while. I really enjoy this bit. The results add that little bit of extra satisfaction when it all works as it should.🤓 The top search light assembly came as a bit of a surprise. It is manufactured from nickel silver plate and requires soldering together. Even though I am a precision engineer, I have not soldered a box since I was at school. Once I stopped burning my fingers with the heat, I quite enjoyed the assembly even though it would have been useful to have an extra hand and took the best part of today to complete.😤 I can honestly say that I have enjoyed most of this build and even though earlier on I was thinking to avoid Aero-naut models in the future, I have changed my mind. They are very cleverly designed. I expect to complete this model some time in March. That would be the first for me to complete in recent times even though I have two others on the go and one new one in its box ready for a Summer start.😊

Building the Cabin. Part 2 by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Before the front window panels can be added to the cabin structure they need to be shaped to follow the curvature of the front deck as much as possible and then glued together with a reinforcing strip on the back of the joint. Unfortunately I made an error 😡 when shaping and jointing the parts and had to make some new panels from some thin ply that I had to hand using the old panels as a template, hence the roughly cut window apertures in the ‘photos. This was unfortunate but I feel better for the confession 🙏. The new window panel was then glued and pinned to the front of the cabin assembly and left to dry while in the meantime I used my hot air gun to heat and bend the roof panel to the correct curvature. The roof panel was then pinned and glued in place on the cabin framework and when dry was trimmed with a small plane and the front window panel trimmed down to the roof profile. I added some additional framing and bracing pieces at the base of the front window panels and a ‘shelf’ which will form part of the dashboard inside the cabin. I also added some extra framing and an end panel at the rear of the roof and a thin square bead was fitted around the base of the cabin sides and front to improve the appearance where the cabin meets the deck. Before adding further detail to the cabin I used some Z-Poxy finishing resin on the roof panel to strengthen it and provide a better surface for the paint finish which comprised of one coat of white primer, two coats of gloss ‘Appliance White’ and two coats of gloss lacquer, all with a thorough rub down between. When all the paint had dried and hardened I gave the exterior of the cabin a first coat of ‘Antique Pine’ stain. Next I will add some detail to the deck.

RC steam lever by Newby7 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 8 days ago
Hi Gary I looked at your harbour post pictures your boats look great. Yes after I ordered the parts I thought of a lever oiler combo will order that in the future when I can figure out the piping I will need and yes I can silver solder. Rick

PS Iona by Harvey Kitten Lieutenant   Posted: 8 days ago
[Score: 7/10] 42"/8000g PS Iona Capable of 4mph and a runtime of 60mins Chain to a Heng Long Powered by NiMH (7.2v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Viper 15 ESC - Comments: It has paddles not propellors! Scratch-built from plan. 2 paddle motors provide independent operation, hence can turn 360 degrees on the spot. Built from wood, brass, 3D printed parts.

Paddle Tug Iona- paddle boxes & superstructure by Harvey Kitten Lieutenant   Posted: 8 days ago
Building the paddle boxes was remarkably easy, once the 1mm ply had been steamed for bending. I decided to build the boxes first and make sure the paddles fitted inside later, the idea being that all this would come apart for maintenance should it be necessary. (it usually is!). There are few models to be found on the internet to use as reference and hardly any images of the original tug. And to confuse matters, PS Iona also existed as a passenger ship, as well as tug, and looked a bit different. The superstructure is really simple and quick to build, with some more planking! Am liking planking small areas now. The funnels came from some scrap plastic tubing in the garage... just the right diameter too, a lucky find. These will screwed in place from below once I have the other funnel parts made. I plan to run the tug on batteries rather than steam, as I am a relative novice to model boat building. The whole deck will be fitted with 1mm ply as a base before... more planking! Before all this is glued in place, I thought it best to water test the ship first and see how much ballast I am likely to need.

Paddle Tug Iona - the hull by Harvey Kitten Lieutenant   Posted: 8 days ago
So... here is a compressed build blog of my paddle tug Iona... and I'm playing catch-up as the vessel is 95% complete and has been sailed already, but there may be some interest in what I've done. Iona was scratch-built off plan and has turned out to be the cheapest build so far out of 3 I've made, mainly because I was able to source materials from the leftovers box! It's a 'mixed-media' boat 😜using traditional methods of plank on frame hull, with paddles made on my 3D printer, and other parts turned on the lathe. So starting with the hull, frames were drawn out, transferred to some scrap 9mm ply and cut out on my bandsaw, along with the keel. These were assembled on a build board with some right angle brackets / measuring tools and test fitted before being stuck in place with epoxy. This was quite difficult as the shape of the hull is critical and comes right at the start of the build. I did remake 1 frame to correct alignment. The deck stringers need to bend in 2 directions, so some steaming with a carpet steam cleaner attached to some tubes worked and the wood clamped in place to dry. Outboard sponsons (?) were fitted to make a frame for the paddle boxes to fit on. Then a large sheet of ply forms the bottom of the hull, and the only job left to complete was the (tedious) planking. This was my 1st plank on frame ship... and it took ages. I think it came out reasonably OK but I'm not a perfectionist and I know if I'd spent more time it could be better... but I didn't! Next blog will feature building the paddle boxes and superstructure.🤓

Building the Cabin. Part 1 by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
The superstructure of the launch is very simple, and from a practical point it was designed to give the crew a large field of view across the river and fast access in and out to deal with emergency situations. Consequently the construction is quite basic and would be quite straightforward if permanently fixed to the boat but this cabin needs to be removable to give access to the battery location and motor. Because of this the cabin needs to be a strong and rigid structure of its own and yet fit invisibly to the rest of the model, it’s also only a three sided structure because of the open access at the rear and that alone will be a point of weakness to the structure. I started by glueing the internal bracing strips to the insides of the deck sides as described in the instruction sheet and some strips that form the base for the sides that sit on the deck, these also needs to be sanded to an angle to sit flush on the deck and also create a vertical face that some further strips are fixed to which meet the inside walls of the deck well. Although all the parts for the cabin are accurately laser cut I chose to do a dry ‘test fit’ using pins and elastic bands to hold the side panels and roof braces together. This 'dry fit' was neccessary because I had previously decided to fit false obeche panels over the balsa sides and floor of the well to get a better surface to finish in the way I intend, balsa does not have any pleasing grain and does not look good even when stained, so I pinned all these panels in place to account for their addition to the internal dimensions of the well deck. When I was happy that the geometry of the side panels and front window panels was correct I glued all the roof braces in place and added some reinforcing fillets to make it more rigid, temporary braces were glued across the front and rear of the assembly to keep the whole thing rigid and square during further assembly. The pins and rubber bands were used to pull in the side panels while the aliphatic glue set. All of this was done with the cabin on the boat so that the correct ‘dry’ fit converted to a permanent fit. Part 2 will continue with the addition of the front window panels and roof.

Build Finalized by Joe727 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
Hello, Finally put some finishing touches on my Rescue Vessel BUILD. Added rubber bumpers to assist in rescuing at bow and stern. Removed the smoker unit as these was complicating the build and was against one of my original objectives....Keep it Simple! Overal all I am pleased with is build, it was fun, quick and built mostly with scraps and parts on hand. The Springer Tug design is a great starter design and can be easily modified to personal tastes. I recommend this to those out there to get some initial or just more experience at building. It's fun! Joe

CNC boat kits...? by DodgyGeezer Commander   Posted: 14 days ago
Not much point uploading a .pdf, unless it has some unusual conversion software. CNC machines work off G Code. The work area is critical for model boat work. Typical parts are long and thin. The eShapeoko I am building is a nominal 1m x 500mm, which lets me do a 36" keel piece. I would like to put out G Code for cutting the EeZebilt boats, but am not sure how to standardise it so that many CNC machines will be able to use it. Different CNC controllers seem to use subtly different G Code commands...

1950s sea commander refurb. by DodgyGeezer Commander   Posted: 15 days ago
".....Thanks for all your comments and input. What i really need now is a copy of the templates sheet so that i can cut some new parts to replace some of the missing ones ....." There was never a 'templates sheet', of course. There were just the original kit parts. This is a fundamental problem with trying to 'save' old model boat plans. The aircraft plans usually have all parts described precisely. Many - possibly most - boat kits are essentially sets of parts with assembly instructions. So, if you need to reproduce an old kit, you need to include part templates as well. Which means a lot of work for someone. Not only do you have to obtain an example of the original kit, measure it up and draw it using a CAD package, but you also have to allow for the fact that wood changes, and that die-cut parts may be cut badly, and so what you have measured may need correcting - sometimes quite extensively. Here's a classic example - the old Yeoman MINX, with templates drawn up...

1950s sea commander refurb. by Colin H. Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
Thanks for all your comments and input. What i really need now is a copy of the templates sheet so that i can cut some new parts to replace some of the missing ones . I have ordered a new rudder, and new plexi glass for the windows. Already in hand is an Mtronics Viper marine 25 amp ESC. 12 volt 7ah battery, Futaba 27 or 40 Mhz RX. Futaba servo. Just awaiting the motor from Doug (RN in Munich). We are going to repaint the Hull in White, Cabin sides in Dark Blue, Cabin roofs in White. The decks will be left as my dad made them, just cleaned and a fresh coat of varnish. the inside of the hull is well sealed already with bitumen (original) which is still allright. Next stage start rubbing down the hull ready for the glass cloth and Ezekote resin. at least i can do this indoors in the warm, workshop too d*** cold. Thats all for today shipmates, more to come, Cheers Colin.

Ultimate Enticement by Puddle-pirate Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 18 days ago
This is a 1984 re-issue of a Lindberg Chris Craft Sport fishermen purchased used on Ebay. Some of the parts where broken and some partially assembled. The model did come with 2 MACK RC motors and some fabricated wood parts, including a template for the aft deck. The interior was assembled from quarter scale doll house items except for the dinette. There are 4 underwater LED bulbs with a dedicated power supply. The running, interior and radar unit are powered by a separate systems from the hull electrics. The second Li-po battery is for backup and balast.

aeronaut by jaffy012 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 21 days ago
hi can anyone help me out there i am building johnny tug boat, the instruction that came with it was in german, i managed to d/load english version, ony problem is the instructions are shocking there is no measurments or dimensions, i have parts i dont know where they go, if anyone can help me id appreciate it, ive even tried to contact aeronaut to no avail, cheers colin👍

Rubbing fenders, more epoxy & hatch coamings. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
With all of the deck planking fitted I can now fix the rubbing fenders to the hull where the deck meets the hull sides. These are made from 6.5mm x 5mm obeche strip steamed and bent to shape and fixed with 30 minute epoxy, unfortunately the strips are not quite long enough to do this in one piece even with the rear rubbing fender in place at the stern so a join has to be made which I hope won’t be too conspicuous. The fender tapers in height from bow to stern and the piece that runs across the stern was made from 5mm x 5mm obeche. All the fenders were ‘pilot drilled’ for the pins that held them in place while the glue set. The complete hull was then given a further two coats of epoxy resin with a rub down between coats and a final ‘polish’ with 240 grit paper used wet. The resulting finish is perfectly smooth and ready for paint. The front and rear hatches were fitted with the coamings that will hold the hatches in place. The rotary disk sander that I bought from Lidl is certainly proving to be very useful in shaping small parts at this stage of the construction. I note that it’s back on sale now (Feb 2019) so if you have the opportunity and £30 ….go buy yourself one! The next stage will be to assemble the cabin.

Carina by Smaragd Lieutenant   Posted: 25 days ago
here is my 2nd Graupner Carina ( after the 1st one I just wanted to built another one and Ebay supplied - again- a 'barely started' set. Taking apart the glued wooden parts was a bit of a challenge. However, the previous owner used cheap glue and all the parts could be dismounted without any damage. (will post more pictures of the rebuilt )