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>> Home > Tags > planking

planking
planked
planks
planking
Ketch Irene by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
Fitted up the masts, just to get away from planking for a wile. Made patterns for the fore sails. A lot of stitching to do as I watch rubbish on TV.

Sea Rover planking by Johnlikessailing Commander   Posted: 11 days ago
Looks good!

Sea Rover planking by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Not liking to see a thread unfinished, here are the photos as promised of the finished planking. Lime planks (Ikea blinds) glued with super glue, black card for caulking, Teak edging, several coats of Halfords spray lacquer, wet and dry in between coats. Final coat rubbed down with 1200 wet and dry then cutting compound, and polished with car polish. Alan

Cockpit deck brass features. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
The aft cockpit deck has two drain holes on the real boat that discharge through a pair of outlets on the transom if the boat takes on any water in the cockpit well. On my model the drains are not connected to the outlets, that’s taking the scale accuracy a bit too far 😜, nevertheless I don’t want a couple of holes in my deck letting in water so I need to fill them in with some drain gratings. I made these from some 10mm thick wall brass tubing and some 2mm brass rod. First I filed three narrow slots into the end of the brass tube about half the thickness of the brass rod and soft soldered them into the slots. The rod was then filed flush to the top of the tube to flatten the profile and form the grating slots, and the overhang filed flush with the tube sides. I used a pipe cutter to separate the finished piece from the brass tube and then repeated the process for the second fitting. The grating needs to be blocked so that It doesn’t let water through and I did this by forming a disc out of black plasticard the same diameter as the tube bore as a stopper and filling the base with epoxy to form the seal, the finished drains were then glued into the deck panel flush with the planking. I used some 1.5mm brass rod bent and fashioned to form the handles for the hatches and these were fixed with epoxy through holes in the panel. Another brass feature on the deck are the rivets around the battery hatch, these are actually some domed rivets with a 2mm head and 1mm shaft that I bought online from RB Models (Poland) along with some other excellent items from their range of ships fittings. www.rbmodel.com Finally the deck panel and main hatch cover were sprayed with several coats of satin lacquer. The panel will need some further work to incorporate the towing hook stays and I’ll cover that in another posting.

Planking…. part 3 by Threelegs Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 24 days ago
Having planked my original 46inch Crash tender in preference to painting, I am most impressed by your attempts. Mine was a first attempt and while turning out well I think yours looks better. Well done. Threelegs

Planking…. part 3 by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
The aft cockpit deck has quite a few features that will test my novice planking abilities so I started the process by very carefully measuring off the drawings and marking out the positions of the main access hatch, battery hatch and the rear drain holes. I want the main access hatch to be removable so I cut this out from the 4mm ply panel with a Stanley knife and put it aside to work on later, the battery hatch will be non-opening and will have a false panel to represent it. I also pre-cut the drain holes but I intend to plank over these and then open out the holes later. The main hatch aperture was first bordered with 4mm maple strip with mitred corners, and the battery hatch with 6mm strip with mitred and radiused corners as per the Vosper drawings. The rear edge of the deck incorporates the two drains and I used some 2mm ply for the raised portion of this area. With these borders in place I then applied plasticard caulking strips to their edges and then proceeded to lay the 7mm maple strips onto the deck, working out from the centre line until the area was fully planked. Fortunately the spacing worked out quite well and did not requiring any narrow strips at the borders. After trimming all of the ’caulking’ flush to the planks with a sharp chisel the whole panel was sanded smooth. As I wanted a paint finish on the two hatches these were left un-planked so I shaped a piece of 1.5mm ply for the main hatch to bring it up flush with the planking and glued the two together after cutting out two small square holes that will form the lifting handles. A smaller 1.5mm panel was also made to form a false battery hatch cover, also with a lifting handle cut-out, and this will be painted before it’s glued down. A couple of bearers were fixed to the underside of the panel to support the removable hatch. After the glue had fully cured the whole deck was given a single coat of spray lacquer to seal the surface and two hatches were primed and painted the same colour as the main decks and then the false battery hatch cover glued down. I will add some brass fitting details in the next stage before the deck panel receives the final coats of lacquer. Thankfully that’s all the planking in place and I am extremely pleased with the way it’s turned out 😁

Planking…part 2 by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
After a successful first attempt at planking the tow-hook deck I then did the same to the mid deck. I placed a 5mm border of maple with mitred corners, but I stepped it out around the forward cabin access door so that the completed deck panel can be dropped and slid into place beneath the door threshold. The planking was placed working out from the centre line to keep the spacing even, and when the CA had fully set the black plasticard ‘caulking’ was trimmed flush with a sharp chisel and the whole surface sanded smooth. There is a small detail on this deck which is identified on the Vosper drawing as a ‘fuel tank sounding’, a sort of dipstick access point I suppose. This part is not supplied in the metal fittings kit so and I fabricated this from a piece of 10mm brass tube with a plasticard insert to replicate the detail. This was then painted metallic silver and let into the deck after cutting a 10mm diameter hole through the planking. To cut this hole I used a short piece of 10mm thin wall brass tube with a sharp edge filed on its internal bore so that it acted as a sort of ‘cookie cutter’ and it produced a neat and accurately sized hole in the deck planking. The ‘step’ formed by the door and frame was painted to match the door and then the complete deck panel sprayed with several coats of satin lacquer for the final finish. I'm getting the hang of this planking lark so confidence is high as I move on to tackle the far more challenging cockpit deck 🤔

Planking...part 1. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
As a novice boat builder I have never done any planking before but after seeing some fine examples on other crash tender decks and read other blog descriptions of the process I thought I’d give it a try as it would be more pleasing to the eye than a plain painted surface. I’m not sure how true to the prototype the planking is on a RAF Crash Tender as it’s not described in the Vosper documentation but I think some ‘modelling licence’ is justified for the visual effect. The choice of materials, planking sizing and the method of ‘caulking’ were all studied in detail in the blogs and discussions and I finally decided on 7mm x 1.5mm maple for the planking and some .7mm black plasticard cut into fine strips for the caulking. All the required materials were ordered from Cornwall Model Boats and all arrived remarkably quickly packed in a long cardboard tube two days later… very good service and quality materials! I made a practice piece to test the process and materials before committing it to the boat, I used a teak stain on the wood as a test as well but decided I preferred the natural colour of the maple after it was lacquered with a few coats of satin finish. When I felt I was sufficiently proficient to start for real I elected to do the relatively small area of the tow hook deck first. This was marked out to get the correct centering of the planks and I commenced with the application of a 5mm border with mitred corners and the plasticard caulking strips on the inside edges. The maple planking is very easy to cut and trim and Is also reasonably consistent in width and thickness. I’m using a medium cyano glue for all of this as it grabs very quickly so that I can work at a reasonable pace but my finger-tips unavoidably end up getting stuck occasionally too 😡 Working from the centre line outwards the maple strips and caulking were fixed down, the final outer pieces on each side needed to be slightly wider to fill the space but the difference is barely noticeable. The ‘caulking ‘ was carefully trimmed flush with the deck with a very sharp half inch chisel and the whole surface sanded smooth. Several coats of acrylic satin lacquer were then applied by brush as I decided it would be easier than masking up the surrounding areas. Buoyed by the success of this I think I'll do the mid-deck and the cockpit too 😁

Ketch Irene by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
Have to turn the boat over for the planking. Resting on a pillow, this allows it to rest in any position & can be hit with a hammer if required. Can't do this with a stand. At the bow can be seen part of the steel keel, the rest pivots down from here.

Thin Flat Timber by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Yep, Ikea wooden blinds are a good source of Lime wood, unfortunately they have stopped making that sort, so it is looking in skip times. Cut into strips and the coating sanded off are excellent for plank on frame boats, also good for deck planking and will take a stain. Alan

Help required please. by onetenor Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Nice boat. Can I offer a tip. If using balsa planking roll the strips on one side with a pencil or thinnish dowel and the wood will assume a curve which will help accomodate the planks to the curvature of the hull Other woods even plycan be treated like this but will require more pressure from something like a heavy dowel.Damping or using ammonia will help too. Good luck with the build.John👍😁

MTB743 by solo1274 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 43"/1900g MTB743 Capable of 7mph and a runtime of 35mins Direct Drive to a COMBO 380 (3 Blade) Powered by LiPoly (11.1v) 11Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through ACTION ELECTRONICS (5Amps) ESC - Comments: This is a Failmile 'D' MTB. This version and number were operated by the 65th Canadian MTB flotilla in the English Channel. I made the model as this version as my Uncle was one of the crew. This model hull is built from scratch in the in the same was the real boats were using double diagonal planking. The propulsion is with 4 props paired using a dual ESC by Action Electronics and 2 11.1v LIPO batteries. These MTB were powered with 4 Packard 4M-2500 Engines with a hull speed of 34.5kts. Armament:- 4 x 18" torpedo's, 2 x 6pdr Mkv11 guns, Twin 20mm Oerlikon gun, 2 x twin Vickers Machine guns on powered mounts, as well as other smaller machine guns on the bridge. For more info goto the Manitoba Maritime Museum

RAF rttl D2763 by teejay Seaman   Posted: 2 months ago
HI members this is a request for help My father served on RAF RTTL D2763 in the 1950s as a wireless operator , there were only five of these boat built in Germany (D prefix on boat number) and there parent station was RAF Sylt although this boat was operated from an town called list. I have searched for some time to find drawings and plans to build a scale model of this boat and found very little . can any one help thank you all for the terrific responses hare is the information I have from http://www.rafboats.co.uk/Thes e craft were built in Germany at the Krogerwerft Yard at Rendsburg. Their "D" prefix brought about their nickname - 'D'-Boats. They had mixed RAF and German civilian crews, with three of the four Deckhands and one of the two Mechanics being German (and sometimes the Coxswain), the Skipper along with one Deckhand, two Fitters, the remaining Mechanic and W/Op were all RAF. Operating from the island of Sylt off Denmark, D2762 and D2765 worked out of Hornum, D2763 and D2764 from List, with D2766 acting as relief boat to cover for any boat out of service. The numbering sequence accounts for the missing boat numbers in the RTTL Mk.2 fleet. With a length to beam ratio of 7:1, their sleek design was very different to any other boats in the Branch, more akin to the Wartime 'E' Boat, with flared bows and rounded bilges and powered by high speed diesels. Their construction also differed with double skin mahogany shell planking, (outer layer laid horizontal, with a diagonal inner layer) bolted to welded steel skeletal frames and keel. Decks were steel with a timber sheathed foredeck. Superstructures were fabicated from steel using snap-head rivets. The hull was subdivided into six watertight compartments, a Forepeak, Crews Fo'csle, Skippers accomodation, Engine room, Sickbay and Galley and finally the after-Tank Space and Tiller Flat. The outfit and finish of these craft was of a very high standard, making them well liked by their Marine Branch crews. They were all initially fitted with winches for Target Towing, these were subsequently removed as the boats duties were confined to Range Safety and ASR work well out into the North Sea. Their duty roster was one day at sea, one day on standby in harbour and the third day off duty. The Ranges covered a large area extending seawards from the island of Sylt. Five 7th Class buoys were laid for use as foul weather moorings, three outside List harbour, one off Ellenbrogan at the Northern tip of the island and the Southern one near Hornum Odde lighthouse. The craft had relatively short lives with the RAF, with all five being disposed of by 1961. D2762 and D2764 were sold to private owners in 1960, and the other were handed over to the Federal German Navy in 1961. They were subsequently used as ASR craft.

Planking the hull. by sandkb Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Timber hull construction finished. Now the sanding and filling of imperfections to prepare for the next stage which will be the application of a fibreglass cloth skin to waterproof the hull and obtain a steel-plated like finish.

Planking the Hull by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Thanks for the update Kevin Descriptions with pics help new and aspiring modellers to perhaps start building. Our members have a wealth of information and are very good at providing solutions or help. Dave