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>> Home > Tags > planking

planking
planked
planks
planking
Deck Veener by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Hi Canabus Thats a bummer. I can't find any mention of the glue you used to fix the outer planking in your earlier posts. I did notice you had used a ply deck but was there some plastic filler on the front part? Some glues are not good at sticking plastic. What varnish did you use? I suspect the solvent in the varnish has softened and weakened the glue. The initial coat would have done the damage with the solvent working its way into the joint over a few days as it dried. These things come to try our patience but I am sure if you give it enough thought you will find a way to repair and learn from the process. Good luck and please keep us posted with progress Dave

huntsman plan by Black Dog Jack Seaman   Posted: 6 days ago
Model Boats magazine January 2016 ncluded a free plan of a Huntsman 31 complete with photos and a step by step build guide. Unfortunately the model is 24". I also wanted a bigger model so I redrew the plan double size. It wasn't too difficult and only took a couple of evenings with a some lining paper from B&Q and a calculator and voila! At the moment I am planking the roof of the cabins and trying to decide between a brushless motor and an old Weston rare earth brushed motor I used to use for fast electrics. The article in MB also ran into February 2016 where all the fiddly finishing bits were described, also with many photos. I expect one can obtain back issues from their web site. Anyone interested in Huntsmen should get these two issues for the detail alone.

Final Deck Planking by lhpen Lieutenant   Posted: 6 days ago
Well done you! Wonderfull job you've made of this model. Hope you enjoy sailing her as much as I do mine. Trevor👍

Final Deck Planking by canabus Commander   Posted: 7 days ago
Hi All Finally finished !!! Canabus

Deck Planking by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
All 'planked out' huh? 😉 Very neatly done 👍👍

Deck Planking by canabus Commander   Posted: 9 days ago
Hi All Just about finished planking the deck. I think I need a planking break!!! Canabus

Deck Planking by canabus Commander   Posted: 14 days ago
Hi Guys Well I installed the aft deck and started planking. The outer trim planking is in two pieces with a joint behind the windscreen because my mate gave me the veneer for free. The idea is to hide the joints with black waterproof sandpaper used for the nonslip pieces shown on the plan. Canabus

Phantom by Tica Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 24 days ago
[Score: 8/10] 28"/1000g Phantom Single Propellor (3 Blade 35mm) Direct Drive to a Turnigy D2836 1100kv (3 Blade) Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) 2Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through HK 30 A Boat ESC ESC - Comments: Bought it as partly build, and had to take it more or less apart to make it straight. Used a PU glue for the first set of planking, what a mess but it's strong. First trails on water showed that the balance was wrong so have to re-arrange the electronics. Unfortunately the trails also revealed that I had missed something with the sealing (my wife used the same materials for her Classic without any problems) so first of all I'll have to strip parts of the mahogany plating down and redo it :-( before I'll do any thing more on this model.

SG&K 1920 Gentlemans Runabout Mk2 by canabus Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Guys Well more planking and work out my rudder setup which has a bit of a unusual design !!!! Canabus

SG&K 1920 Gentlemans Runabout Mk2 by canabus Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Guys Only more planking, but, I can finally start to see the hull shape. The veneer planking is dam strong and very light. The only part which I think I maybe required another stringer is the cockpit between the stringer and the sides, but, I will add some 2 ounce fibreglass matt when I resin the inside.

The Launch by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
As soon as the cutter was off the build-board, I started on the launch. The launch is the largest of the ship's boats and the only one of them that's carvel planked. The build board was cut narrower for the reason spoken of earlier. Since the frame spacing was the same, I could reuse most of the marks. The stem, keel, sternpost, and transom plus a sternpost knee, were assembled. The forms were cut from balsa again, sanded to the line and rough beveled, then glued to the board. The ribs are 1/16" thick x 1/8" wide bass again. This time I didn't glue them to the forms at all, they're only helg by the rubber bands. Once they were on the forms, the keel assembly was glued to the ribs and the build board and planking commenced. When the planking was done, the stem and transome were cut free and hull lifted off the forms. The ribs between the ribs were added. The drawings of Constellation's boat didn't show anything more than their lines. I had little information as to their interior and hardware details. For the launch, I did know she carried a 12 pound boat howitzer and some information on that which gave me a little more about the boat's interior. Using Ivan as a guide (He's a 1:35 scale WWII Russian sailor and the model's first of some 30-40 eventual crewmen) I determined there needed to be a deck in the boat so that went in, but first I painted the bilges of the boat as I'd never be able to get in there after the deck went on. The launch was coppered. I used peel-and-stick aluminum duct tape to "copper" the bottom, and painted it copper. I have a 1:36 scale British frigate in the works, and this is how I intend to "copper" her as it's less than 1/4 the cost of Constellation's real copper. The launch has special tracks and rails in her for handling the gun. The gun can be shifted fore and aft, and the field carriage can be tossed in the sheets, and rolled forward on tracks of it's own for taking ashore. We're still a long way from Higgins boats here folks. 😉 There's more details to add, to boat boats; hardware, water casks, thole pins, oars, sails, etc etc etc. There's also 4 more boats to build; the 2nd cutter, whaleboat, and two quarter-boats just alike.

Ship's Boats by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Building a model ship often means building several models because most ships have boats. Constellation had six. My method for building boats is nearly the same for building larger hulls and real boats - planks over forms. I have a 1:12th scale drawing of Constellation's boat's in particular from the National Archives. They not only printed me a copy, but gave me a .tif image which I easily re-scaled to 1:36. I reproduced the lines as forms extended to a baseline so the boat could be built upside down. I drew each boat's patterns and arraged each to fit on a sheet of copy paper. I print this on a full sheet label so I can rough cut them, stick them on the form material, and then cut the forms. I had a few sheets of 1/8" balsa sheet and that's what I cut the forms from. A pine plank was used for the building-board, and marked where each station would go, then the forms were glued on making sure each was 90° to the form and square to the center-line. A note on the build-board, it doesn't have to be as wide as the boat, and should, in fact, be narrower. Then you can access inside the sheer and planking and removing the boat from the forms will be much easier. A small plank of 3/4" stock will let you get rubber bands completely around the model, and it will also fit in a vice which is very convenient. The edges of the forms are shaped so the planks will lie flat on the surface, and not teeter on the corners. Using balsa makes this easy work, though you have to be careful not to snap them off the build board. I started with the ship's 1st cutter, which is a lap-strake, or clinker-built boat. (Only the launch is carvel planked) It's frames are 1/16" thick bass strips 3/32" wide. Each frame is dipped in ammonia and bent over it's form. I put a dab of glue at the ends that would eventually be cut off to hold it to the form, but for the frames on the wine-glass and hollow forms at the ends I used rubber bands to pull them into shape. Part of the reasoning behind using balsa for the forms is if anything gets glued that shouldn't, it's the form and not the model that will give-way first. The stem, stern-post, and keel are 1/16" bass, assembled together while flat. First the top corners of the keel were planed off to make a sort of rabbet. The transom is also bass as it stays in the boat. The transom is cut taller to reach the build-board, and partially cut at what will be it's top to make it easier when it's time to detach the boat. It's glued to the stern post and the build-board, the keel is glued to each frame, and the stem is glued to the build-board. This pretty much forms the rigid skeleton of the boat. There's two ways to represent lapstrake planking on so small a model. One way is to sand each plank so it's half as thick at it's top edge as its bottom. The planks are butted on the boat, thick against thin, giving the impression of overlapped planks. I chose to actually overlap the planks because the inside of the boat is open to view. Since each plank of a lapstrake boat overlaps the one below it, each plank has to be spieled, or shaped to fit, and the boat must be planked from the keel to the sheer. I divide the length of the widest frame from the keel to the sheer into the number of planks I want, then divide the lengths of the stem and the stern by this number. You'll find the planks will get narrow forward, and flare wider back aft. You may have to experiment a bit with the number of planks so maintain at least 2 scale inches forward and not more than 5 scale inches aft, or the planking will look nonsensical and out-of-scale. I planked the cutter in 1/32" thick bass. The first planks are the garboards, next to the keel. The next plank I places a strip of card along side and used a piece of plank against the edge of the wood plank to mark the card. The marks are actually the bottom edge of the plank. Each plank is shaped on it's bottom edge to the plank before, and it's top edge is straight. Then I dip it in ammonia and clamp it in place, where "clamps" are rubber bands, blocks of wood, pins, clothes pins, whatever works. Again, a narrow build-board allows the rubber bands to pull in as you reach the sheer rather than pulling them away from the boat. Once your brain gets wrapped around spieling, the planking will move along. But don't try to do too much too fast or you'll just get frustrated and ruin everything. Take lots of breaks. The planks need to be sanded thinner at their ends, almost to nothing, depending how much of a rabbit was cut into the stem. At the stern they run right off the transom and are cut flush. You can notch the transom into step for each plank to fit into, of fill the little gaps where they overlap with putty later. Since they're getting painted, I used putty. When the planking is done up to the sheer, it's best to add rub rails and strakes while the boat's still on the forms. I then finished the cut in the transom, cut off the stem near the build-board, and nipped off each frame where it was glued to the form. Then carefully lift the boat off the forms. Some form may have come off with it, and some spots may need to be reglued. I installed frames between each of the ones the boat was built on, putting a frame about every scale foot. Seat clamps, floor boards, seats, oar notches, lifting eyes, mast steps, etc, are all added bit-by-bit. before you know it, you've got another model boat. I'll get into the launch next.

Laurel ll by Kipper Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
[Score: 8/10] 32"/2200g Laurel ll Capable of 5mph and a runtime of 120mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 35mm) Direct Drive to a Mabuchi 555 (3 Blade) Powered by Lead Acid (12v) 4Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Viper 10 / Mtroniks (5Amps) ESC - Comments: Stood on a shelf for a number of years before purchase, planking dried out & sprung at the bow, leaking along both sides. Repaired & equipped with new motor & electrics over the winter.

Building a deck by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
I began laying the deck on April 5th. It had snowed as recently as the week before, but it finally warmed up enough to use glue. The strips were cut to 6-5/8" length, about 20' in 1:36 scale. I used a black marker on two opposite sides to represent the pitch in the seams. The deck was laid in a 5-plank pattern to mix up the butt-joints as much as I could. My research on her decking found she's had various styles and plank widths over her life. The earliest photo showing her deck that I could find, showed it straight planked with 7 or 8" wide boards based on the number of planks between her waterway and the main hatch coaming. Her waterway logs seem to be placed ON the decking, as there's no margin planks or joggling - even today. The planking was set with gel CA. Gorilla sells it in a nice bottle with a metal pin in the cap to keep the spout open. It would up taking 3 of these bottles to complete the deck. The planks are cut at a 45 on the ends along the fore and aft access hatches, to try and hide this seam as much as possible. Once the deck was down, I scraped it. The glue is more resistant than the basswood is, so sanding would have scalloped the wood between seams. Scraping makes everything level. Some lite sanding, more to polish than remove anything, was done last. I had planned to stain the deck a very light grayish tint, but an active naval vessel gets holy-stoned regularly and wouldn't be gray as the ships that sit at a dock today are. In all it took 455 pieces to complete the deck and there wasn't any scrap longer than 1 inch left over. In all I have 3/4" deck beams, 1/4" plywood, a layer of 4oz cloth and resin, and a 3/16" basswood deck - I don't recall why I designed it so heavy, but it certainly doesn't hurt the model at all, and I think the 3/16" square strip will prove to have been easier to set than the 1/16" x 1/4" planks Pride and Macedonian will get. The deck go a coat of water-based satin poly, and I stared working on hatch coamings, cap log, and waterways. The cabin skylight and two hatched forward of it, including the capstan, and all combined into one hatch where the battery is accessed, and which hides the aft ballast rod and main power switch. The cap logs Are 1/2" wide x 1/4" tall basswood that was tren'led, glued, and copper nailed, onto the deck, flush with the outside of the hull covering this seam completely. The the angled wood waterways were installed around the inside of the cap log, and the deck got a coat of oil-based satin poly. This actually leeched in and made the marker seams bleed a little. In hind sight, I think I'll go with paint over marker for seams in the future. The coamings got painted black. I'm not sure why the Navy painted deck fittings black. It was even common to paint to top surfaces of tops black. I wonder how many injuries and losses this cost the navy that white paint would have prevented. Anyway... Constellation didn't have "solid" bulwarks, but rather she had hammock irons bolted to her cap log. These were removed when Baltimore tried to pass her off as a frigate and tossed in the bilge. When the ship was restored as a sloop of war, they found all but one. These irons are designed to have wooden rails at their tops, inboard and out, and have holes so several lines can be run through them. The Navy in it's wisdom though, decided to wainscot them to appear as solid bulwarks, despite the additional splinter hazard that would be in battle. I wasn't making all those metal stanchions just to hide them under wood and tarps, so I made wood blocks sheathed in sheet bass, scribed to look like vertical wainscotting. It was the end of April by now, and the Baltimore Port Expo was in two weeks. I wanted to have hammocks in the bulwarks, as she appears in the portrait, but there was no time to figure this out, so I layered on some balsa and shaped it so it looked like tarps were laid over the hammocks. When I figure out how I'll represent the stowed hammocks, I can pull the balsa off easily enough. The bulwarks on, I made some fittings for the spencer masts; installed the eye bolts at the base of the masts; made some bollards (or whatever name they gave those posts), made and installed the catheads, which are laminated 1/16" basswood. I then started setting up a jury rig and her controls so she could sail at the Port Expo. I set her t'gallants and all three heads'ls this time around. By the night before the Expo, she was ready to go.

Sea Hornet by canabus Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Jim I will be watching this built very close, as I have built one from original plans and also did the 25% as a future project. Because of the very limited engine and radio hatch, I design them larger, but, you are on the right path. I installed a 28mm brushless motor, 3S 2650mah Lipo battery with a 2 blade 32mm brass prop. I don't think the 25% bigger a one would require any more power as it a rocket. My hatches run down the deck planking lines, the original hatches are only for show. The engine starts from the front seat and finishes at the rear windscreen. I made up the cockpit floors etc. before I skinned the sides, a lot easier, also the floor is split over the keel with the seats one piece. Can-a-bus Canabus