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>> Home > Tags > pool

pool
pool
Hartlepool by Midlife306 Captain   Posted: 3 hours ago
Did they have a hanged (French spy) monkey on display by any chance? Cheers Wayne

Hartlepool by marky Lieutenant   Posted: 3 hours ago
Just back from the romantic weekend and as a little surprise my wife took me to the National museum of the Royal Navy Hartlepool if your ever in the area go along what a brilliant day out plenty to see and do and the Hartlepool museum has some lovely model ships on display ,photos to follow, of the museum not of the romantic weekend

Mersey ferry Wallasey/Marlowe by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Hi Rob, try here http://www.merseysidermagazine.com/site/local-history/the-me... or here http://www.wirralhistory.online/ferries.html or here http://www.liver style='background-color:yellow;'>poolmuseums.org.uk/maritime/archive/sheet/27 Happy Hunting, cheers Doug 😎

Voyager of the Seas cruise ship [Filmed in UltraHD/4K] by Dom of Essential RC Lieutenant   Posted: 16 days ago
This was at a temporary pool at the Wings & Wheels Model Spectacular Show.

The electrics, drive & radio by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 17 days ago
Hi robhenry Thank you for your complimentary remarks. I didn't really consider building the boat with twin motors and rudders as I wanted to build the kit 'out of the box' to a great extent and also because I was rediscovering the hobby and all of the new technology and techniques that it now benefits from. With the experience I and knowledge that I have now gained I would be not so hesitant to consider such things. I'm grateful for your contribution to Mike's data on the RAF boats as it will have no doubt filtered down to the benefit of my boat build. As I have discovered, surprisingly little information on these boats exists or has been made public despite their popularity with model builders and it would be a great thing if everyone were to pool their knowledge and resources to try and redress this situation. I will certainly try to photograph the boat in action if I can manage the controls and a camera at the same time 😁 Rob.

As of Summer 2017... by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 22 days ago
After the sail, I added some hardware to the spars, namely jackstays. I also ordered some aircraft plywood and used it to make new winch drums. These are sized to my current plan of only bracing the tops'l yards. Hopefully, this is the last set I'll have to make. Seeing into the dark interior of the hull can be a pain, more so the brighter it is outside. Mark got some red LEDs to light up the dash of his old pick-up (ute for my Assie friends) and gave me a left-over section. It requires a 12 volt supply (I'm running 6) and red doesn't really help in daylight, but I like the idea. If I can find a white LED strip that'll run on 6 volts, this will definitely get put in. The stern also had folding bulwarks like the bow, but that wrapped all the way around. On the real ship these were replace with a fixed bulwark except for a couple of panels that allowed access to the stern boat. By the time the ship came to Baltimore in 1955, these too were gone, with all their hardware. Again, I'm not making them functional, and decided to built these on the model rather than as separate pieces like on the bow. The hinges are represented inboard by card stock and brass eyes. The barrel portion of the hinges outboard at the bottom of each panel will be a little section of 1/16" wood dowel. The forward bulwarks were epoxied in place and the support rods were installed all around. The tops are raw because they all get a bright cap rail (varnished natural wood) and I'll put that on when it won't get messed up with paint or glue. A friend sent me a box of stuff, among which was a nive little cat face perfect for my catheads. Only having one, I was going to cast a pair in resin. But I'm out of casting resin and epoxy glue didn't set up in a way I liked, so we'll come back to that. The tops'l yards on the ship are hinged iron bands, line with wood staves. I wanted to replicate that functionality not only because that's what the ship has, but because it would allow me to take them off the mast without unrigging half the ship. I cut some heavy copper I use for everything and bent it into two half circles; soldiered brass tubing to the ends, and sawed out the notches with a jewelers saw. If only it had been that easy. Soldiering here tended to un-soldier there, cold soldier joints wouldn't hold. I gave up in frustration. I changed the gun carriages based on some research I did, but I'll post separate entries dealing with them and the ship's boats. I went looking for information on soldiering little things, and took another whack at the parrels. This time it worked out much better. I reused the copper band and brass tubing for the main and made the fore the same way. I still have to make the mizzen tops'l yard parrel, but my soldiering has gotten much much better. Last May ('17) I took the boat to the Baltimore Port Expo for National Maritime Day again, surrounded by members of our newly formed White Rocks Model Boat Club. I didn't manage to get her controls set-up in time, so she didn't go in the pool, but sat on her cart and looked pretty. I put her courses and trys'ls on her for this. The trys'ls won't be used when she sails, but can be set for static displays. The courses will get used, but I'll be able to buntl them up as shown to reduce sail. Also to reduce sail, the t'gallants and royals will be easily removable, or replaceable, as the case may be, depending on what wind there is. That pretty much brings us up to date as of July 2017. I'll post something about the boats and guns in a bit, as well as any other progress that's made. There's far more detail, images, and notes at my website on this, and the other models I'm working on at: http://todd.mainecav.org/model/ There's a few items I skimmed, or skipped over, like her signal flags, that are covered in detail there; like the day she was almost dismasted by the garage door.

First REAL Sail in Open Water by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 23 days ago
I wanted to use separate controls for fore and main+mizzen, but my "new" winch drums where crap, and I only had one drum, the wood disc and cardboard one I've been using. So, I linked all three masts together. It was very near the end of October, but the forecast was for light breezes and mid to high 50's (about 13°c). I rigged her royals for the first time, ran all the bracing through the tops'l yards instead of the courses. I redid the bracing plan to only use tops'l yard braces instead of both tops'l yards and courses. This simplifies everything, and hopefully it would be enough. I had a list of specific items to test, so based on that list, here's a report on the first time Constellation really sailed, under full control, in open water: First off, she was sailed in Rock Creek in Maryland USA. My friend Mark has access to the neighborhood boat-ramp three blocks down the street. He brought his "Son of Erin" along, rigged as a sloop (it's convertible) and his grand-kids who also lived nearby. So... 1. Test fit in car; she hasn't been in my Toyota Matrix yet. -It was tricky at first, but it worked. None or nothing else is getting in the car, so this isn't the preferred transport by any means - but it's nice to know it's there. Note in the photo, in the car on the left is the launch cart with the wheels removed, packed in nice and neat. 2. Test the new launch cart. -As noted, it broke down and packed away really nicely. The approach to the ramp was very steep, and I took her down head first so she wouldn't slide off the back of the cart. The bumpy ground made the model slide back a lot. I'm going to put a stop in the channel that will catch the edge of the PVC cap and should fix that problem. There's was also a lot of slop in the flag pole bracket, the hole for the bolt that holds the two parts is bigger than the bolt, making for too play in the handle. I replaces it with another pole bracket that fit more snugly. The wheels are hard and a bit jarring, especially on the ramp where there was broken concrete underwater so cars wouldn't sink into the silt. The handle was the bigger problem though, slopping up and down and flexing. Otherwise the cart performed as expected and I was really pleased with it. When I used it to one side of the ramp where there was hard sand, I had no problems at all. 3. With the royals set, she'll be sailing with the most sail so far. -The forecast was for Northerly winds up to 5 mph. Up in the creek that was variable in direction and speed, gusting at least to 15 now and then, sometimes from two directions! The model took it all very well, though my heart beat faster every time she heeled, I don't think she once got her gun-stripe wet. 4. Test fore tops'l yard brace routing. -No problems at all, everything worked are designed, for a change. 5. See how self-tending bowlines rigged on the main tops'l work out. -They seemed to function just fine. When the model was close enough to see them, they didn't snag or interfere with the sail or bracing. 6. Actually sail the model in open water instead of bumping the bottom in a shallow pool. -A combination of joy and terror. Every gust my heart raced, but she sailed great and went where I meant her to go from the beginning. 7. Get some pictures and video of the model sailing. -One thing that went wrong was my camera's batteries dying, so I didn't get all the pics and video I wanted. Fortunately, Mark was on hand and took some shots and video with his phone. In all, the day was a resounding success. Everything went well, nothing broke or failed. And she sailed! Not like her first sail where she barely made head way for more than a few seconds, but controllably, reliably, and fast too! I handled her by myself. Mark was there and offered his help, but part of my test was seeing if I could deal with it all 100% by myself. No problems. The awkward bit was sitting her on her ballast and lining the rods with their holes without her falling off. That's something I need to work out, otherwise no part of loading, unloading, launching, retrieving, etc, was more than one person could handle. In the end, what I though would work out back in 1999 did. Here's 16 minutes of that day's sailing... https://youtu.be/80b2au24rFQ

The Big Heavy Model Boat Launching Blues by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 26 days ago
Fully set up, I'm guessing Constellation weights between 100 and 110 pounds (I haven't had the opportunity the get an accurate measurement yet). Taking her to events with pools requires lifting her into the pool. I haven't figured out a way to do that easily, or safely, or more importantly, alone. I built her to sail in open water, so the 2 or three times I have to ask for help at a pool isn't a big deal. I'm sure that most of the time I'll be launching her at a ramp or shoreline, and that I'll need to move her from the parking area to the shoreline, however far that may be. There's times I may be faced with a bulkhead, but like the pool, there's no easy fix for that with a model this size. My first plan was a hand-truck set-up like the picture of my friend Ray from RCGroups, and his SC&H model of Surprise, a very similarly sized model to mine. The hand-truck is plastic and the cradle is wood, and you can see it's pretty bulky to hold a 100 pound model. Ray said his issue with it was it floated. When launching he had to push it down to get the model clear, and when retrieving he had to hold on to it or it would fall over, while trying get hold of a big model with spars sticking out everywhere. If the water was choppy or boaters were making wakes, it was that much more difficult. He also didn't like that he had to go into knee-deep water, at least. Dan, also from RCGroups, and the fellow that developed the sliding-brace-winch, has an SC&H brig he's modeled as the US brig Syren. It also came with the same hand-truck Ray's Surprise did. Dan wasn't all that enamored with it either. He pointed out how when you lean it back to move the model, it put you in among the rigging risking damage or even injury. Dan altered his hand-truck into a cart and has not looked back. In my mind, it's a boat. I have a 16 foot sailboat, and to move it, and launch it, I use a boat-trailer, so it would make sense to make a boat-trailer for the model. I scribbled an idea on paper, but then turned to some old 3D modeling software so I could see it better. My model has a 4 foot long ballast tube bolted to the keel. So I figured a U shaped channel to cradle that tube and support the model would be the basis of the cart. While Dan's cart has worked great for him, I didn't care for his 3-wheeled arrangement. Like an actual boat trailer, I opted for a single axle right under the model. I figured this would be more easily maneuvered and handle terrain a little better. I figured on making the cart from angle steel I dould bolt together. I over-designed the thing a bit, drawing a framework that would cradle the model that the more I looked at, the less I thought I needed. Going back to my real boat trailer, It just had center support and a pair of carpet cover skids (bunkers) to hold the boat up-right. Simple is always the best approach - and I had just the right material to build this cart from - a steel bed-frame. This L-angled steel had the strength to easily carry the model while using a minimum of material, and it certainly wasn't going to float! Two girders would form a U shaped channel to cradle the ballast tube. I figured a rod axle would need support or it could bend with a 100 pound model bouncing on it, a third angle would be set across for the axle. A couple of upright posts with padding would hold the model upright. Nearly all the weight of the model rests in the channel, so there's not a lot of strain on the uprights. I didn't have a cutting wheel so tried cutting the bed frame with a reciprocating saw. Bed frame steel is hard, it ate both blades, and two more I bought before finally getting the three main pieces cut, though I had no trouble drilling it. I used the u-bolt portion of a set of wire-clamps to hold the axle. A bit of flat steel to brace the axle so it wouldn't try to twist. It's all held together with nuts and bolts. I wanted short pieces of steel for and aft to hold the loose ends of the channel, but I wasn't gonna try to cut that stuff again, so I just used some scrap 2x4. To hold the handle I tried mounting a wood block with a hole forward, but then I remembered I had a flag-pole mount from when I replaced a rotten post on the porch. It took some searching, but I found it and screwed it on. The wheels are shopping cart wheels bought new from Ace Hardware online for about $5 each. I looked into inflatable wheels to give a softer ride, but they were too expensive for me. I watch the local thrift shops though, and if something shows up with nice wheels, I'll grab it. A fender washer goes on the axle first, so the wheel doesn't rub against the axle support; then the wheel, another washer, and a hitch-pin holds it all on. I can pull the hitch pins and remove the wheels making it easier to stow the cart. The uprights are simple 3/4" pine with some pipe insulation for padding (as opposed to tennis balls in the 3D model). They're bolted to the axle support, but I want to alter that a little so they can be folded in to make the cart flatter for transport. The handle is an old wood closet pole I've had for a long time. A bit too old it would turn out, but that's a later story. I painted it white for visibility as it also serves as a guard to protect the model's bowsprit from cell-phone wielding idiots that seem to be the most common form of life on this planet now. I painted the cart blue, because it wasn't black, white, or red; the other colors I had. Unfortunately, I wasn't ready in time to the museum event, and didn't go, but I wanted to sail the model before it got cold, and see if this thing worked.

Just Keep Swimming by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 28 days ago
The maritime museum's event, scheduled for October instead of May, was cancelled as a hurricane blew up the coast and pushed water up the bay flooding a lot of coastal bay towns like St Michaels. I couldn't make the next Port Expo in 2016, but I tried to be ready for the maritime museum in October. I started making the forward bulwarks. The real ship had sections that folded down on bronze hinges a few of which still exist as she still had her forward bulwarks when she came to Baltimore. They could also be removed. I mad all the section as a single piece and I don't intend to make them functional, just something to snag and need to be repaired. As mentioned, the original winch drums warped and I made new ones with styrene drums instead of wood. These vanished around the time I moved and haven't been found yet, so I got some sheet plastic to take the place of the CDs and made a new pair. I have to say, I'm not happy with these at all. I did add a small block of Delrin to each winch to brace the drums against the pull of the braces/springs. Constellation's board at her entry port were carved. I took a photo of an original at the ship and traced it in PaintShopPro. Scaled it to the model and printed it. I glued this to some bass wood. I have some mahogany I can slice some thing slabs off of, and I may try using a rotary tool to carve a set for real, but till then, these will do. I tried to make the tops'l yard parrels which are iron hoops lined with wood. There's a pin for the yard's yoke to ride on, and the hoop can be opened and hinged to be removed. I wanted all that in case I need to remove a yard at some point without pulling down the whole rig. I tried it with some sheet brass, and again, I wasn't too hgappy with the result. We'll come back to that. So, I fiddled around with cutting combs to make hatch gratings, and actually managed to get something done, which led to making the main hatch cover. I had cut a bit of plywood as a cover, just to keep dust from going below while I was working - I based my hatch cover on this piece, framed the bottom; installed ledged for it to sit on inside the hatch coaming, and made gratings and fake beams on top. It's a bit simplified buy what the ship actually had, but it gets the point across. A couple of smaller gratings also got installed giving the deck a more finished appearance. I wasn't thrilled at bumping the bottom of a pool again, but the maritime museum is on the Miles River. I needed to be able to launch and retrieve the model at a boat-ramp or shore, so I started designing a launch-cart....

Model Engineer December 1962 by AllenA Commander   Posted: 29 days ago
I wonder if this young man still has his passion for model boats.. He is Charles Martin of Walton on Thames giving a final check to to his tug before launching it on an indoor pool at the Model Engineer Exhibition in 1962. It says in the write up that boys and girls can see radio controlled models demonstrated. I guess most boys and girls now own one. Charles must be about my age and I hope he is well and still sails regularly.

Port Expo 2015 by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 29 days ago
Constellation and Pride got stuffed into the van, and off we went. This year they had moved the pool down near the end of the dock and we got to be under the tent with the other exhibitors. I took Pride along this time as well. The director of Historic Ships Baltimore sailed on Pride when I did in 81. He was with the boat longer than me, and I think my model brought back some memories. The pool's still too shallow, but she sailed a little and looked good even aground. Pride got put in the pool for a moment, only the second time she's gotten wet. No sailing yet, her ballast fin isn't made yet. Here's a little video of Stella playing in the pool: https://youtu.be/Q9eBR-kax7k

Triton by Krampus Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
With my boats getting routinely stranded in the middle of nowhere, I felt compelled to commission a rescue vessel and "Triton" was born. "Triton" is a Springer-type tug push boat. With a hull and superstructure consisting of an “Indiana” style command cabin, it was built using a pretty basic birch plywood American kit designed for swimming pool water polo. Kit altered to resemble a fictitious Salvamento Marítimo (Spanish Coast Guard) unit following Salvamento Marítimo’s actual boat markings. Equipment and deck layout inspired on actual Springer tug push boats supporting larger vessels and barges found in US and European ports and rivers. Model built during September – October 2015. Approx. 1/18 scale. Real life boat could be a 30-footer (9.14m) vessel. Equipped with 9v LED navigation lights and sound system. Powered by an HPI Racing 1145 Gt 550 Motor, NiMH 7.4v battery, a 3-bladed 44mm propeller, and a 6-12V 320A RC Ship & Boat R/C Hobby Brushed Motor Speed Controller.

On Public Display by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
This would be the first time I ever put something on public display. Well, some drawings went up in a high school art show, but this was certainly the first model. The Port Expo had set up a pool on the dock next to the N.S. Savannah. It was windy, with the wind whipping around the ship every which way. The pool wasn't deep enough for the model to sail, so she just sat there tied off to one end, or down in the lee corner. Not a big deal, but I got to talk to a few folks about her, and that was fun. One of the other modelers told me about the model expo at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St Michaels Maryland, in just two weeks! Last time I had been to that museum I went on a 170 foot barkentine, this time the boat would be a little smaller. There was no way I was going to get much work done on the model in the time I had, but there was something I wanted to try out. From the start I had a sail-arm servo set-up to handle the fore-and-aft sails, but I hadn't worked out how it would work. The heads'ls over-lapped and each had two sheets. When the model come-about, the heads'ls needed to be hauled over the stays to the other side. When sailing a real boat, like my 16 footer 'Lydia,' it's the same thing. When you start to come about, you cast-off the jib sheet. As the boat comes across the wind, the jib luffs and comes across mostly on it own. The the new sheet is hauled in and made fast. I wanted to emulate that on the model. My solution was two loose arms with the servo arm between them. The servo pushes one or the other of the loose arms to sheet the heads'ls - but not both. Center the servo and both jib-sheets are slack. It's incredibly simple and works on a single servo. I cobbled the system together in time for St Michaels. We also got one of those pop-up tents, and a folding table. I was taking the Pride of Baltimore model, and the Macedonian hull as well. I was getting into this public display thing. The Model Expo was great. There were a boat-load of modeler's and model there. The pool was much larger, but it was still too shallow, and Stella ran aground after sailing only a few feet. Only Constellation went in the water, but all three models got a lot of attention and I spent a lot of time talking to folks about them. The jib-sheeter worked great, though the servo only had 90° of travel and the Dx6 isn't programmable that way. When I got home, I went right to work on another control mechanism I wanted to try - the sliding-winch.

what fittings for a plane prop by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Chris and Sonar I bought mine at the Blackpool Show and Brian offered me the top at the same time. I believe he intends to make a part kit in time and the top I and my friend have were from the development stage. Perhaps if you give them a ring and speak to Ann or Brian they will also sell you the top. Certainly makes for a strong boat and is relatively quick to build if you have model aircraft experience. There are running formers on the base so they help keep the model relatively straight in the water. Great fun especially if there is no wind for the yachts or the weed is being problematic. Dave

Lindow common. by onetenor Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Liverpool was well off for pools dotted about in odd places Known mainly to anglers.Plus a mere now drained in the Everton area. But mainly the parks ,Nearly all of them have a model boating pool or a part of the main lake accessible for model boats however due to vandalism at Walton Hall park the clubhouse there had to close. As a result most sailors use Newsham Park pond which the council look after. Or did. I've not been there for years as I now live in N.Wales so don't know how it is now.IIRC there was never a weed problem at any of them either