Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
October 2018: 5 people
September 2018: 13 people
August 2018: 5 people
July 2018: 8 people
June 2018: 8 people
May 2018: 7 people
April 2018: 24 people
March 2018: 13 people
February 2018: 8 people
January 2018: 9 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (16)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > port

port
port
PS Waverley by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 hours ago
real gentleman who started selling timbers for modelmakers, but had to stop that as he got a sensitivity to the dust of woods, but he also had a range of amazingly good stuff for amazingly low prices, including various stanchions. I bought all the remaining portholes from him because I hate glazing portholes! I have tiny working compasses, rigging scissors, tiny woodscrews, rigging cord, bottle screws, all sorts from him and all cost me very little. Alas, health issues have caused him to cease trading and he has been flogging of his stock on ebay. A great loss. Martin

Rudders and Propellers by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 hours ago
BTW; I copied your above massive text block into a document file and split it up into paragraphs so I could see where you're at! My conclusion: so far so good BUT! You made the one classic mistake of many model boat / ship builders 🤔 You continued the prop shaft tube right back to the propeller and hence you had to make oversize struts to support them. This is fundamental wrong and creates unnecessary work.😉 On real ships, including the Schnellboote, the so called 'stuffing tube' is JUST THAT, it 'stuffs' the shaft through the hull and includes stuffing glands to prevent the ingress of sea water. Outside the hull ONLY the rotating shaft itself continues on through the bearing in the support strut and to the prop. See attached pics of my HMS Belfast as an example. There was actually no reason for you to make oversize strut bearings, simply bushes to match your prop SHAFT not the tube would have been correct. Inside the real ship there is also NO TUBE, only bearings at suitable intervals. They look like gigantic versions of the big ends in your car. Imagine on really big ships, carriers, container ships, bulk tankers etc, with shaft diameters of 1metre or so how big the 'tube' would be, how much weight that would add and how difficult it would be to service and maintain! I've often noticed in posts here that folk confuse shaft and tube, often referring to the whole assembly as 'the shaft'. For convenience we modellers use prop tubes, who wants to fiddle about making a row of internal shaft bearings no one will ever see and will most likely never be really concentric? The downside is that continuing this 'convenience' outside the hull is wrong, adds weight and detracts from the scale appearance of the model. 😭 OK, it's 3am here now so - orf me 'obby 'orse and up (in my case down!) the wooden stairs to Bedfordshire, G'night all, cheers, Doug😎 Re shaft length: What fits fits, what don't don't! Such a question is like asking 'How long is a piece of string?'! If all three motors abreast won't fit you have to decide if the central motor should / will fit fore or aft of the outer motors. Then measure / adjust the shaft length accordingly. Before you start fitting the centre motor check what length shafts are commercially available and adjust your motor fit to suit. Otherwise make your own shafts and tubes to fit as required, as I've started doing cos I got fed up with 'standard sizes' wot don' wanna fit my ship. 🤔 G'night All, cheers, Doug 😎

PS Waverley by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 hours ago
Hi Martin, My stanchions were pre-drilled, from Graupner ca 30 Years ago. Never 'eard of Modelling Timbers. Timber stanchions!!!😲 I "only" had to drill the holes in the decks (thought that was what you meant), there were enough of them. Much worse though was fitting all the two part portholes 😡 Since fibre glassing the the hull I have to do that all over again😭 Frankly I think anyone who gets so many stanchions made as castings without pre-drilled rail holes need his bumps feeling. I thoroughly agree ref mini drills, too easy to snap fine drill bits. 👍 For precision / repetitive drilling I use my Proxxon mini milling machine as a drill press. If I need more than one of something I knock up a simple jig (usually from hardwood taken from demolished old furniture) to hold the work piece in the machine vice attached to the milling machine cross bed. I took the irritating collet fixing off the mill and fitted a real 3 jaw chuck 😉 Happy 'Vincenting', All the best, Doug 😎

1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 hours ago
Hi peter, Wow! Price has gone up since I bought mine! But it IS good, I'm very happy with it. With the really really cheap ones I'm always a bit sceptical of the fine control, accuracy and concentricity etc. These are even more important when working on very very small parts - aren't we always!? Afraid the only book I have on lathe work for model builders is in German. Must be similar books over there!? Try searching Amazon. BTW: I hope you meant 'The Bee's Knees' and not the 'Dogs Breakfast'! 😲 Re 'pestering friends'; You CAN'T pester real friends! 😉 I'm sure they'd be very glad to help and advise. If not; they ain't friends 🤔 Cheers, Doug 😎

Voltage increasing via regulator by EricMB Commander   Posted: 1 day ago
Evening all, I have a voltage regulator I’d like to fit to my Southport tug (currently running on 7.2v Ni-MHs) in order to get it up to 12v. I’m after more speed/power and would particularly like the bow thruster running a bit faster than it does on 7.2v. So, the questions are, where to fit it in the wiring loom, and what will the effect be on the battery life? Advice please! Thank you in advance...

Kit Quality ETC. by canabus Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Hi Ian. A Mahogany deck with light strips between would look better and another colour for the cabin, but, yes to the brass portholes. Canabus

Kit Quality ETC. by Ianh Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 days ago
To give you some idea of the quality of this kit. Here are some photos. The quality is excellent and if you have a bit of experience this can easily be built. I don't fancy the all white look as the original had mahogany cabin sides and brass portholes this is what I will do with it,👍👍

The Building Board by Wingcoax Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 days ago
I still have a set from thirty years ago, now here in Portugal. With a new board i must say.

The Building Board by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
I like the 90 degree supports , very versatile, are they commercially available?

Ellesmere Port Model Boat Club by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Hello there epmbcmember. I went to visit you site a couple of weeks ago to sus out the approach. A great pool and facilities. Met a very helpful lady who give me a look around and a membership form. I am a little limited in movement and your setup looks to be at the right height, approachable and no parking problems. I live in North Wales and will be sending the membership form in as soon as I can find my cheque Book! All the best. NPJ.

Veron Vosper F.P.B. 52" by kevinsharpe Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 4 days ago
Hi John. Interested to know what kind of offers you have had. Boaty, yes Veron did an RTTL Rescue Target Towing Launch, they featured in the black and white film ' The sea shall not have them'. This though is their fast patrol boat. I believe it's called a 'Trinity class patrol boat and some were supplied to the Trinidad and Tobago navy. You will sometimes see the model bares the name Coureland Bay'. I have seen photos on this website of her. They were built by Vosper Thornycroft in Portsmouth. If I was building her I would put two meaty brushless motors n her which should bring a sprite lay planing performance. I have fitted two Graupner 900s in mine, which give her an excellent turn of speed. These are brushed motors but are not available any more. The hull space is vast so easily accommodates batteries with space for sound system working radar etc. Regards Kevin

A Tragic Tale Unfolds by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
About a month ago I came across a wooden model of a Side Trawler by the name of ‘Maartje’ dating from what I assume was the Sixties. It is 84 cm long (33 inches) with a beam of 19cm (7.75 inches). The then owner had found it in a poor state and had reconstructed and painted to a large degree, but then turned to model trains. It was not known whether it was a ‘kit’ or ‘scratch’ built but he had however found it was a model of a boat, UK 223, lost with all hands in the North Sea off Texel (NL) in 1967 thought to be registered in Diss UK.. I am aware that such a tragedy is not uncommon with sea fishermen but I had never come across a model of such a boat. I had some time on my hands so I started to make enquiries and I was surprised how helpful people were. I had contacted the Dutch Embassy in UK, the Press Association in Netherlands and the Texel Tourist Information Centre. Within a very short time I had responses not just from those sources but also from others they had contacted. A major response was from the Embassy with the names of the crew of five, some were never recovered and important, was information from the Harbour Master of the Port of Urk, Netherlands confirming the boat was registered there and who then contacted the son of the captain of the ‘Maartje’ and gave him my contact details. I am pleased to say the captain’s son Jauwk contacted me and we are now in frequent communication. So we now know the date of the loss, the sea area, weather conditions names of the crew and results of the enquiry. Also very personal and emotional information including the fact that two of the crew were father and son and that the captain’s wife was carrying his son, Jauwk at the time of the loss. You never know what this hobby may lead you into. NPJ.

Hobby King receiver clones by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
I had realised that John, the acronym DEAC had simply revived some ancient memories of my early days in mobile and hand-portable radio engineering. Circuitry and components, early ICs etc, were moving on much faster than battery development could keep pace. Good to hear from you👍 Pecker up old chap, with you in spirit. Best wishes, Doug

Rudders and Propellers by teejay Commander   Posted: 9 days ago
Hi all for the second blog report on the schnellboot I am going to go over the rudder a propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat, these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts. which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel) and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum powder mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The fourth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I must ask for some help could anyone advise me on the length of propeller shafts, I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft, but port and starboard will have to be longer. and I also need advice on selecting the motors, I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.

Old outboard motor... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
That's how the modern ones work, but I assume the flexi is stainless cable rather than a spring. I have one from Hobbyking for a fast little kneeler to 152VO rules, even though I'll never race it as all their events are in Germany and Holland and I don't have a Passport, but I do like the boats. I shall be off to try cutting this ancient one apart to repair the motor and wiring. I'd love one of those Keil Kraft Elmic Sprite outboards, but can't justify the cost. And any of the O&K scale working o/bs are gorgeous. Cheers, Martin