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>> Home > Tags > port

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a very noisy fireboat by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 hours ago
Hi Paul As I already have the Action sound unit (Whitby lifeboat engine sound, my model) and a 20w amp I sourced some resonators from Holland www.soundimports.eu/. They were out of stock for the initial order so I bought two lower power exciters to see what they were like. Attached to the back deck of my Trent and plenty of volume but the vibration was very visible. I have now received some 24Watt (Dayton Audio DAEX25FHE-4 Framed High Efficiency 25mm Exciter 24W 4 Ohm) similar to yours and they are attached to the hull sides above the waterline and sound great on the bench. Will be trying on our lake as soon as the weather improves but should be as good as the big 8" speaker I was using and several pounds lighter so the model will sit correctly on the waterline. Thanks for sharing this sound medium Mine are attached by 3M VHB (Very High Bond) adhesive so I am hoping if I need to move or replace I can buy some glue to re-attach Dave

The Big Heavy Model Boat Launching Blues by Jerry Todd Lieutenant   Posted: 8 hours ago
Fully set up, I'm guessing Constellation weights between 100 and 110 pounds (I haven't had the opportunity the get an accurate measurement yet). Taking her to events with pools requires lifting her into the pool. I haven't figured out a way to do that easily, or safely, or more importantly, alone. I built her to sail in open water, so the 2 or three times I have to ask for help at a pool isn't a big deal. I'm sure that most of the time I'll be launching her at a ramp or shoreline, and that I'll need to move her from the parking area to the shoreline, however far that may be. There's times I may be faced with a bulkhead, but like the pool, there's no easy fix for that with a model this size. My first plan was a hand-truck set-up like the picture of my friend Ray from RCGroups, and his SC&H model of Surprise, a very similarly sized model to mine. The hand-truck is plastic and the cradle is wood, and you can see it's pretty bulky to hold a 100 pound model. Ray said his issue with it was it floated. When launching he had to push it down to get the model clear, and when retrieving he had to hold on to it or it would fall over, while trying get hold of a big model with spars sticking out everywhere. If the water was choppy or boaters were making wakes, it was that much more difficult. He also didn't like that he had to go into knee-deep water, at least. Dan, also from RCGroups, and the fellow that developed the sliding-brace-winch, has an SC&H brig he's modeled as the US brig Syren. It also came with the same hand-truck Ray's Surprise did. Dan wasn't all that enamored with it either. He pointed out how when you lean it back to move the model, it put you in among the rigging risking damage or even injury. Dan altered his hand-truck into a cart and has not looked back. In my mind, it's a boat. I have a 16 foot sailboat, and to move it, and launch it, I use a boat-trailer, so it would make sense to make a boat-trailer for the model. I scribbled an idea on paper, but then turned to some old 3D modeling software so I could see it better. My model has a 4 foot long ballast tube bolted to the keel. So I figured a U shaped channel to cradle that tube and support the model would be the basis of the cart. While Dan's cart has worked great for him, I didn't care for his 3-wheeled arrangement. Like an actual boat trailer, I opted for a single axle right under the model. I figured this would be more easily maneuvered and handle terrain a little better. I figured on making the cart from angle steel I dould bolt together. I over-designed the thing a bit, drawing a framework that would cradle the model that the more I looked at, the less I thought I needed. Going back to my real boat trailer, It just had center support and a pair of carpet cover skids (bunkers) to hold the boat up-right. Simple is always the best approach - and I had just the right material to build this cart from - a steel bed-frame. This L-angled steel had the strength to easily carry the model while using a minimum of material, and it certainly wasn't going to float! Two girders would form a U shaped channel to cradle the ballast tube. I figured a rod axle would need support or it could bend with a 100 pound model bouncing on it, a third angle would be set across for the axle. A couple of upright posts with padding would hold the model upright. Nearly all the weight of the model rests in the channel, so there's not a lot of strain on the uprights. I didn't have a cutting wheel so tried cutting the bed frame with a reciprocating saw. Bed frame steel is hard, it ate both blades, and two more I bought before finally getting the three main pieces cut, though I had no trouble drilling it. I used the u-bolt portion of a set of wire-clamps to hold the axle. A bit of flat steel to brace the axle so it wouldn't try to twist. It's all held together with nuts and bolts. I wanted short pieces of steel for and aft to hold the loose ends of the channel, but I wasn't gonna try to cut that stuff again, so I just used some scrap 2x4. To hold the handle I tried mounting a wood block with a hole forward, but then I remembered I had a flag-pole mount from when I replaced a rotten post on the porch. It took some searching, but I found it and screwed it on. The wheels are shopping cart wheels bought new from Ace Hardware online for about $5 each. I looked into inflatable wheels to give a softer ride, but they were too expensive for me. I watch the local thrift shops though, and if something shows up with nice wheels, I'll grab it. A fender washer goes on the axle first, so the wheel doesn't rub against the axle support; then the wheel, another washer, and a hitch-pin holds it all on. I can pull the hitch pins and remove the wheels making it easier to stow the cart. The uprights are simple 3/4" pine with some pipe insulation for padding (as opposed to tennis balls in the 3D model). They're bolted to the axle support, but I want to alter that a little so they can be folded in to make the cart flatter for transport. The handle is an old wood closet pole I've had for a long time. A bit too old it would turn out, but that's a later story. I painted it white for visibility as it also serves as a guard to protect the model's bowsprit from cell-phone wielding idiots that seem to be the most common form of life on this planet now. I painted the cart blue, because it wasn't black, white, or red; the other colors I had. Unfortunately, I wasn't ready in time to the museum event, and didn't go, but I wanted to sail the model before it got cold, and see if this thing worked.

Just Keep Swimming by Jerry Todd Lieutenant   Posted: 2 days ago
The maritime museum's event, scheduled for October instead of May, was cancelled as a hurricane blew up the coast and pushed water up the bay flooding a lot of coastal bay towns like St Michaels. I couldn't make the next Port Expo in 2016, but I tried to be ready for the maritime museum in October. I started making the forward bulwarks. The real ship had sections that folded down on bronze hinges a few of which still exist as she still had her forward bulwarks when she came to Baltimore. They could also be removed. I mad all the section as a single piece and I don't intend to make them functional, just something to snag and need to be repaired. As mentioned, the original winch drums warped and I made new ones with styrene drums instead of wood. These vanished around the time I moved and haven't been found yet, so I got some sheet plastic to take the place of the CDs and made a new pair. I have to say, I'm not happy with these at all. I did add a small block of Delrin to each winch to brace the drums against the pull of the braces/springs. Constellation's board at her entry port were carved. I took a photo of an original at the ship and traced it in PaintShopPro. Scaled it to the model and printed it. I glued this to some bass wood. I have some mahogany I can slice some thing slabs off of, and I may try using a rotary tool to carve a set for real, but till then, these will do. I tried to make the tops'l yard parrels which are iron hoops lined with wood. There's a pin for the yard's yoke to ride on, and the hoop can be opened and hinged to be removed. I wanted all that in case I need to remove a yard at some point without pulling down the whole rig. I tried it with some sheet brass, and again, I wasn't too hgappy with the result. We'll come back to that. So, I fiddled around with cutting combs to make hatch gratings, and actually managed to get something done, which led to making the main hatch cover. I had cut a bit of plywood as a cover, just to keep dust from going below while I was working - I based my hatch cover on this piece, framed the bottom; installed ledged for it to sit on inside the hatch coaming, and made gratings and fake beams on top. It's a bit simplified buy what the ship actually had, but it gets the point across. A couple of smaller gratings also got installed giving the deck a more finished appearance. I wasn't thrilled at bumping the bottom of a pool again, but the maritime museum is on the Miles River. I needed to be able to launch and retrieve the model at a boat-ramp or shore, so I started designing a launch-cart....

No power by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
A final thought for tonight: at 19:21 (CET - Munich time, 18:21 UK time) you reported that the RX LED was lit and the ESC LEDs flashing. Was the rudder servo plugged in at that point?

No power by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Hi Nick, sorry but I must ask why can't you ever describe completely what's happening? Example, above you write 'Yes I did have the ESC and servo plugged in..' but you didn't say if the rudder ever reacted when the ESC apparently did. Trying 'all and every ways' is not exactly the scientific method and usually leads to more or less fatal damage. Frankly Dave and I are beginning to wonder if you are trying to wind us up!? Had you followed our step by step instructions and reported back the results before trying anything else we would have long ago been able to cure the problem or diagnose the faulty component. Please help us to help you. Regards Doug

bargain of the day by marky Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 days ago
Hi Dave ,it a is a portable gas forge , i work at the university and we had to get rid of our coal forge due to being in a smokless zone so moved to gas easy ,cleaner and quicker ,still use the bolts, tinmans solder and bakers soldering fluid ,health and safety are fine with me using them ,do you know if your dad used to hold the bolt near his cheek to feel if it was hot enough .cheers Mark

bargain of the day by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Hi Marky Our Blacksmith has a portable furnace like this when he come to shoe the horses. Dad used to have a big (12oz) copper soldering iron just like this. He used a gas ring to heat it. Used to solder and repair car radiators. He also had a Wolf electric iron with a similar sized head. Great big 14"sq solder rods and Bakers Flux. Health and Safety would probably have a fit if they saw you using it today. Good to see that there are still others who have used and still have this skill. Dave

Port Expo 2015 by Jerry Todd Lieutenant   Posted: 3 days ago
Constellation and Pride got stuffed into the van, and off we went. This year they had moved the pool down near the end of the dock and we got to be under the tent with the other exhibitors. I took Pride along this time as well. The director of Historic Ships Baltimore sailed on Pride when I did in 81. He was with the boat longer than me, and I think my model brought back some memories. The pool's still too shallow, but she sailed a little and looked good even aground. Pride got put in the pool for a moment, only the second time she's gotten wet. No sailing yet, her ballast fin isn't made yet. Here's a little video of Stella playing in the pool: https://youtu.be/Q9eBR-kax7k

No power by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
Hi Nick Your ESC needs setting to the TX/RX. It is very important that before you switch on the Tx all the sticks and trims are at neutral and set for normal as against reverse. Switch on the Tx plug the Esc with battery connected into the Rx ESC socket. Switch on the ESC, both leds flash red green. Whilst they are flashing push the small button on the ESC. The green light should illuminate, push the relevant TX stick fully up, the red led should illuminate, pull the stick fully down and then return it to neutral. Both red and green LEDs should be lit whilst the stick is in the neutral position. Pushing the stick up fully will light the green LED (forward) fully the other way the red LED will light (reverse). The motor will run if connected. Your ESC is now set up to work with this Tx/Rx combination and will retain the setting each time you switch on. Always centre your sticks before switching on to avoid the motor starting due to a non central position. Different Tx/Rx combinations may require you to repeat the procedure. The same procedure should work for all Mtronic ESCs with a button including your two. Dave

No power by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
Looks like this is a 3 channel set. The battery can be plugged into any port with 1,2 and 3 used for servos etc.. When binding, the top port is used for the binding plug and the battery plugged into any other port. The lights should be flashing on the rx with the bind plug connected and go solid when the Tx is in bind mode and the process has completed. Normal use with an ESC and servo is port 1 and 2. Dave

No power by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Hi Nick, Curiouser and curiouser! 🤔 Please give us individual photos of all your kit; TX, RX, ESC so we can read the labelling. Plus a general view showing everything and how you've wired it up. So far I have not found an Absima RX with the Bind port in the 4th slot! Have you tried the tests Dave and I have suggested? Results? Cheers Doug 😎

No power by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Hi Nick, If you really have the R3FS RX then what you say above is wrong! The Bind channel slot is CH3. The Battery connector is the 4th slot. See pic from the so called User Manual. I would first try to Bind the RX without the ESC, then you can forget about BEC or not 😉 For this put the binding link into Ch3 slot and the battery in the fourth slot. Then- 1. Install a charged battery in the TX and switch it off. 2. Insert the Binding Link into the Ch3 channel „BIND“ port of the receiver. 3. Connect the receiver battery to any port of the receiver, (leave the ESC out for now) the red LED starts flashing indicating that the RX is starting the tuning process.. 4. Press and hold the „BIND“ button on the transmitter, and switch it on. 5. Watch the LED on the receiver. If the LED stops flashing, the binding process is successful. This process takes up to 5 sec. 6 Release the „BIND“ button on the transmitter, take out the „BIND“ link. 7. Install the servo for testing, in CH1 or 2. 8. If the test fails, repeat 1 to 7 above. 9. If the test succeeds, remove the RX battery, plug the ESC into slot 2, rudder servo into slot 1. As attached wiring diagram, which assumes an ESC with a BEC. All should now work assuming your batteries are OK and the ESC-BEC is working! If not Go back to step 7; No ESC, RX battery in slot 4, servo in slot 1 or 2. If this works then your ESC (or at least the BEC) is duff! 🤔 Hope this does the trick, at least to find out where the snag is - if any! 😉 Viel Glück! 👍 Doug 😎

No power by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
NickW is this the radio set https://www.models style='background-color:yellow;'>port.co.uk/absima-sr2s-2-channel-2.4ghz-radio-control-system/rc-car-products/407387 If so it's a 2 channel set with a rx with 4 sockets. One is for the battery and I assume the rest are for ESC and Rudder. You have tried putting the connectors in the two furthest sockets from the battery socket. It could be only two are actually live as regards signal controls. As the lights come on the plugs are in the correct way. Doug I did find some Utube help on the set but it was all in German or could have been 'Dinglish'. I do hope you will be able to help with the translation. Happy days dave

Building a deck by Jerry Todd Lieutenant   Posted: 4 days ago
I began laying the deck on April 5th. It had snowed as recently as the week before, but it finally warmed up enough to use glue. The strips were cut to 6-5/8" length, about 20' in 1:36 scale. I used a black marker on two opposite sides to represent the pitch in the seams. The deck was laid in a 5-plank pattern to mix up the butt-joints as much as I could. My research on her decking found she's had various styles and plank widths over her life. The earliest photo showing her deck that I could find, showed it straight planked with 7 or 8" wide boards based on the number of planks between her waterway and the main hatch coaming. Her waterway logs seem to be placed ON the decking, as there's no margin planks or joggling - even today. The planking was set with gel CA. Gorilla sells it in a nice bottle with a metal pin in the cap to keep the spout open. It would up taking 3 of these bottles to complete the deck. The planks are cut at a 45 on the ends along the fore and aft access hatches, to try and hide this seam as much as possible. Once the deck was down, I scraped it. The glue is more resistant than the basswood is, so sanding would have scalloped the wood between seams. Scraping makes everything level. Some lite sanding, more to polish than remove anything, was done last. I had planned to stain the deck a very light grayish tint, but an active naval vessel gets holy-stoned regularly and wouldn't be gray as the ships that sit at a dock today are. In all it took 455 pieces to complete the deck and there wasn't any scrap longer than 1 inch left over. In all I have 3/4" deck beams, 1/4" plywood, a layer of 4oz cloth and resin, and a 3/16" basswood deck - I don't recall why I designed it so heavy, but it certainly doesn't hurt the model at all, and I think the 3/16" square strip will prove to have been easier to set than the 1/16" x 1/4" planks Pride and Macedonian will get. The deck go a coat of water-based satin poly, and I stared working on hatch coamings, cap log, and waterways. The cabin skylight and two hatched forward of it, including the capstan, and all combined into one hatch where the battery is accessed, and which hides the aft ballast rod and main power switch. The cap logs Are 1/2" wide x 1/4" tall basswood that was tren'led, glued, and copper nailed, onto the deck, flush with the outside of the hull covering this seam completely. The the angled wood waterways were installed around the inside of the cap log, and the deck got a coat of oil-based satin poly. This actually leeched in and made the marker seams bleed a little. In hind sight, I think I'll go with paint over marker for seams in the future. The coamings got painted black. I'm not sure why the Navy painted deck fittings black. It was even common to paint to top surfaces of tops black. I wonder how many injuries and losses this cost the navy that white paint would have prevented. Anyway... Constellation didn't have "solid" bulwarks, but rather she had hammock irons bolted to her cap log. These were removed when Baltimore tried to pass her off as a frigate and tossed in the bilge. When the ship was restored as a sloop of war, they found all but one. These irons are designed to have wooden rails at their tops, inboard and out, and have holes so several lines can be run through them. The Navy in it's wisdom though, decided to wainscot them to appear as solid bulwarks, despite the additional splinter hazard that would be in battle. I wasn't making all those metal stanchions just to hide them under wood and tarps, so I made wood blocks sheathed in sheet bass, scribed to look like vertical wainscotting. It was the end of April by now, and the Baltimore Port Expo was in two weeks. I wanted to have hammocks in the bulwarks, as she appears in the portrait, but there was no time to figure this out, so I layered on some balsa and shaped it so it looked like tarps were laid over the hammocks. When I figure out how I'll represent the stowed hammocks, I can pull the balsa off easily enough. The bulwarks on, I made some fittings for the spencer masts; installed the eye bolts at the base of the masts; made some bollards (or whatever name they gave those posts), made and installed the catheads, which are laminated 1/16" basswood. I then started setting up a jury rig and her controls so she could sail at the Port Expo. I set her t'gallants and all three heads'ls this time around. By the night before the Expo, she was ready to go.

Triton by Krampus Lieutenant   Posted: 5 days ago
With my boats getting routinely stranded in the middle of nowhere, I felt compelled to commission a rescue vessel and "Triton" was born. "Triton" is a Springer-type tug push boat. With a hull and superstructure consisting of an “Indiana” style command cabin, it was built using a pretty basic birch plywood American kit designed for swimming pool water polo. Kit altered to resemble a fictitious Salvamento Marítimo (Spanish Coast Guard) unit following Salvamento Marítimo’s actual boat markings. Equipment and deck layout inspired on actual Springer tug push boats supporting larger vessels and barges found in US and European ports and rivers. Model built during September – October 2015. Approx. 1/18 scale. Real life boat could be a 30-footer (9.14m) vessel. Equipped with 9v LED navigation lights and sound system. Powered by an HPI Racing 1145 Gt 550 Motor, NiMH 7.4v battery, a 3-bladed 44mm propeller, and a 6-12V 320A RC Ship & Boat R/C Hobby Brushed Motor Speed Controller.