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>> Home > Tags > port

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The Hull Markings by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 hours ago
The paint on the hull has sufficiently hardened and needs a couple of coats of clear lacquer to protect it but before that happens I need to apply the hull markings. The waterslide decal set that was supplied with my kit was probably at least 5 years old when I bought the kit on eBay and they had deteriorated so badly that when I put the large ‘FIRE’ lettering panel in some warm water it fragmented and clearly was not usable. I called Mike Cummings at vintage Model works and explained my dilemma and he very generously agreed to supply me with a replacement set, and in addition a set of the recently available printed vinyl letters and markings that they now produce. I decided to use the vinyl set as a quick test piece with the waterslide set revealed that the white ink is not solid and therefore not completely opaque. Furthermore I could not eliminate the ‘silvering’ effect that happens on waterslide decals despite using various lotions and potions such as Humbrol Decalfix and Microsol/Microset solutions. A test piece with the vinyl lettering sheet was far more successful and when over-lacquered on the test piece the results were very acceptable. Starting with the large FIRE lettering I cut a paper template the same size as the complete word and fixed this with low tack masking tape on the hull, this paper was then outlined in more masking tape to form a window and the vertical spacing of the letters transferred to this to keep the correct spacing. Vertical strips of tape were then used as positioning guides for the letters which were individually cut and placed so that I could eliminate all but the solid white letters and give them a hard edge. Feeling very pleased with myself I removed the masking tape guides and realised to my horror that I had set the baseline of the letters far too close to the waterline and the vertical proportions were completely wrong ….disaster 😱 Feeling ashamed that I could make such a basic error I abandoned the lettering and called Mike at VMW and described my foolish error, no problem he said, I’ll send you another vinyl sheet and also some additional drawing that were missing from my kit that would help with detail finishing. My second attempt with the new vinyl sheet employed the same process but I was careful to measure, mark and check the positions (several times!) before starting. The roundel and numerals positions at the bow and the stern were carefully measured and marked using the supplied drawings and masking tape ‘guides’ used to fix their positions before application. Lastly the roman numerals that span the waterline at the bow and stern were marked, cut and individually applied. I also took the opportunity to fix in place a couple of modified 6mm portholes to replicate the aft cockpit drain outlets, in the photo is the ‘94’ waterslide decal which I later removed and replaced with vinyl when I could not eliminate the ‘silvering’ problem. A big Thank You to Mike Cummings at Vintage Model works for replacing the lettering sheets TWICE! and for the extra drawings, I call that exceptional after sales service !. Cheers Mike 👍👍 .

Feathering set up by Trillium Lieutenant   Posted: 2 days ago
A beam was needed to support the pivot for the feathering mechanism. It was made to straddle the gap between the two sponson supports. There’s even less information available about this than there was for the feathering mechanism. My second attempt was the best solution and comprised the following parts. - Two 3/8” lengths of ¼” brass angle; with a clearance hole drilled in the top flange near one end, to suit the small sheet metal screws I had on hand - A length of 1/8” x ¼” rectangular brass tube to span the gap between the sponsons. - Approx 2” length of ¼” x 0.030” thick brass strip - A ½” length of ½” wide by 0.030”thick brass strip - A 7mm length of 3/16” brass tube as a bushing for the pivot. The rectangular tube was cut to length to fit across the sponson supports and inside the paddle boxes. The two pieces of ¼” angle were soldered at right angles under the ends of the 1/8” x ¼” tube. The paddle wheel and the beam were placed in position. The paddle wheel was set up while stationary to position the paddles so that one was on bottom dead centre and vertical. The axial position of the pivot point centre was marked on the beam, and the distance below the edge of the beam measured. The top edge of the ½” square strip was intended to be flush with the top of the beam, and a 3/16” hole was drilled through the former at the pivot point centre. This was soldered to the ¼” wide brass strip, and then the 3/16” tube soldered into the hole. The drill press was used to set it at right angles to the strip for soldering. The strip was joggled, to ensure the rotating paddles cleared the support beam, and with the 3/16” tube on the side nearest the hull. The brass strip was clamped to the support beam, with the complete assembly in place, and the pivot position adjusted to give the optimum motion of the mechanism. The brass strip was soldered to the support beam, and then removed and painted.

Edward . M. Cotter by GARTH Lieutenant   Posted: 3 days ago
[Score: 8/10] 39" Edward . M. Cotter Capable of 3mph and a runtime of 60mins Single Propellor (4 Blade 70mm) Direct Drive to a Johnson (4 Blade) Powered by NiMH (7.2v) 4Amp/h Batteries - Comments: The real fire boat is stationed in Buffalo New York . This fire boat visits Port Colborne on Lake Erie every year for Canal Days & because the model boat club I'm in sets up a display at the museum in town I decided to build a scratch build of this boat I used the prints of the Sequin Midwest tug for the hull & Internet photos for details. I used the tops of Lepages glue bottle to simulate the Monitor on the decks I'm real proud of them.

Wheel assembled by Trillium Lieutenant   Posted: 8 days ago
The paddles were cut from 0.050” styrene, the attachment points for the support arms drilled, and the support arms fitted and glued in with epoxy. The paddles and the side wheel assembly were painted black, with small pieces of masking tape over the pivot holes in the paddle support arms, where the pivot tubes were glued to them, and painted over later. When it came to assembling the parts, the sequence was as follows: - Fastened one end of the links to the inside face of the master rod (looks like a banjo); using #2-56 UNC bolts with the bolt heads on the outside face, a 4.5mm length of 1/8” brass tube as a bushing, and two #4 washers, and a #2-56 nyloc nut. - Inserted a #4-40 UNC bolt and washer in the centre of the master rod from the inside, secured it with a 5/32” brass tube bushing, lock washer and nut - Fastened the outer end of the links to the paddle arms, with the links on the outside of the paddle arms, with the bolt heads on the inside face, otherwise same as inner end of the links. The next step is to make the support for the pivot of the feathering mechanism.

Model Riva Sportsboat by JohnM Apprentice   Posted: 16 days ago
4ft model Riva Aquarama sports boat for sale, as featured in 'Model Boat' Sept. 2011. Mahogany build. Immaculate. Radio controlled. Twin electric motors. All batteries, controls etc. Hardly used due to bereavement. Based in Coventry UK. £300.

ship hull blanks or bodys by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 days ago
Hi Welcome to the site. I see from your profile that you are resident in the USA. There are suppliers in the UK and Europe but transport costs may make them costly. Robbe used to do a kit of a similar vessel but at about twice the size. Many hulls are made of fibreglass so would they suit your purpose? You may like to look on http://modelsbydesign.co.uk/mo del_boats.aspx. Dave

ship hull blanks or bodys by 1Ghost Apprentice   Posted: 16 days ago
Hello : I am looking for a place to obtain plastic boat hulls . They do not have to be scale or of a specific boat . I am looking for some that are in the basic shape of a Damen research vessel ,or other type with a high bow line and then dropping to a flatter deck. About 24" long and 8"+ wide . Detail is not real important . I wish I could be more precise but as its for a test project ....sssssssh black OPPs / Skunk Works . Sorry for my odd post but as I'm going to use this for non rc project I'm not well versed in it . thanks !

Orange Mystery by saga32 Petty Officer   Posted: 18 days ago
Vane sailing, must be fairly old? Do you know any more of it's history? I've got the sail winch working again on mine and it's been in the water a few times. Needs more attention to sail rigging. At present there's either no wind or too strong wind. I sail at a pond at Pickie Fun Park in Bangor Co.Down Used to visit Portsmouth while my son was in the RN

solent lifeboat stanchions by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 18 days ago
Hi Cliff I believe it would have been 3:32 or possibly 7:64. The important point is to make sure you do not weaken the brass tube but also be sufficient to allow the chain to pass through. I suggest you buy some chain then use the smallest drill that allows the chain to pass through. I suggest you look at www.eileensemporium.com/ as they supply brass tube at reasonable prices and different thicknesses. I bought my chain from SHG http://www.shgmodels.com/. Download the catalogue and look at page 25. Good luck with the build Dave

solent lifeboat stanchions by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 18 days ago
Hi Cliff I used 1/8" diameter brass tube from B&Q. Made a jig and drilled each post with two holes to accept some brass chain I bought bt the metre from SHG supplies at one of the E. Port shows. Mine has sixteen either side and are 90mm from top to deck. I made a small shaped brass piece to cover the open top of the tube. I have seen others using flat strip of a similar size. If you use the lifeboat tag on your post you will find lots of posts, keep selecting "see more" and you will find pics of solent models. I am attaching pics of my model and hope this helps. If you are after a true scale version I suggest you look on the Mayhem site or the Lifeboats 24 site. If you or any other viewer find my answer helpful please feel free to tick the "like this post" box. Dave

Web Site Funding by allenrod Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 19 days ago
ATENTION. ATENTION...... All hands on deck.... all ranks including officers.... Now hear this, January web site funding met and slightly exceeded target.. not time to be complacent though, lets see if we can meet a target of 28 donations for Feb. Note membership rising fast nearly 30 new members joined in January, please support the site by donating, I appreciate not everyone has available funds but "those who can should" Thanks shipmates.... At ease Allen R

Tags. by Haverlock Admiral   Posted: 25 days ago
the important thing about Westbourne models is to stop mentioning them ! 😜

Rediscovering my old hobby. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
Rewind…. When I first started my build blog I described my visit to the London Model Engineer exhibition in January 2016 and that my enthusiasm for model making was re-kindled. It was as a result of seeing a crash tender model on the Blackheath MPBC stand and getting into conversation with the owner of the boat. He went on to inform me that kits were still being made for them and he gave me the names of a couple of companies to look at. His valuable information led to some further research on the subject and finding various sites including this one which I immediately registered with, and I subsequently bought a Vintage Model Works 46" RAF crash tender kit and embarked on my rediscovered hobby. Fast forward…. I attended the same exhibition this January and was delighted to see the same chap on his club stand and I took the opportunity to remind him of our previous meeting and discussion and to thank him for his advice and recommendations. He looked at some of the photographs of my boat that I had on my camera and he was very complimentary on my building efforts. That chap is Phil Abbott, otherwise known to his friends as Steamboat Phil, and I would like to give him the credit for re-igniting my model making interest. Thanks Phil, I hope you are following and enjoying my build blog. Robbob

To resin cover or not my ulises steam tug by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
Hi Mate, welcome to the forum, First of all there is no such thing as newby question, only what you dont know or are uncertain. I would always resin cover the hull, added strength etc, less chance of dings. But, glass cloth or borrow the wifes tights!!! all good for the hull, Resin I have used polyester resin in the past but i now use epoxy layup resin, comes with different time hardeners, or the resin from delux, cant remember the name is water based, (very little smell) I would also pore resin inside the hull as a sealant (between bulkheads and roll the hull around to spread the resin over your planking, also great as you mention its a steam tug so oil etc wont affect the hull. Finish is down to detail sanding and filling, if its smooth to start with it will be far easier to get a smooth finish. Hope this has given you some guidance, shout again if you need more. PS. If your looking for a club, have a look at Etherow MBC we are in Romiley, just out of Stockport Regards Mark

White metal deck fittings. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 29 days ago
In between coats of black paint there’s time to prepare more of the white metal deck fittings. They all require a bit of a clean up to remove casting lines and flash, and this is easy to do with an assortment of small files, blades and a small suede shoe brush with brass wire ‘bristles’. After a quick clean up with panel wipe I fixed them all to a piece of card with small strips of double sided foam tape to stop them getting blown around by the pressure of the spay can and gave them a couple of light coats of etch primer. To assemble the anchor I used some 2mm brass rod with some brass ends made from some larger diameter brass rod, drilled and filed to a pleasing profile, a bit of plasticard was added to neaten the pivot point and the assembly was also given a coat of etch primer. The cooling water outlet tube and flange and the dummy exhaust ports (adapted portholes) were primed also. They’ll get a coat of black gloss before they are fixed to the stern. I’ll tackle the fire monitors next…