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>> Home > Tags > prop tube

prop tube
brass tube
brass prop
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prop shaft
propeller
propshaft
propshaft alignment
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prop tube
Shroud for Model Air Boat by DodgyGeezer Commander   Posted: 2 days ago
Copper will solder well (though it will take some heat!). But unless you use a very light and flimsy gauge it will be very heavy. Brass will solder well - don't know the size of prop you want - may be a bit expensive. You can bend thin sheet round a former to make any diameter shroud. Aluminium tube should do, if you can get an off-cut the size you want. Don't play around with aluminium soldering, which is a specialist job - but small pop rivets will work perfectly... We don't know the size you are interested in, so it's hard to advise on materials. But if your boats are static models, card or thin plastic sheet will be fine. A slice from a plastic squash bottle may fit the bill?

Rudder location, blocking, fabrication by Joe727 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
Looking at the proper rudder location, I added some 1/4 triangular hardwood blocking to both sides of the centerboard. Needed blocking to drill through. Was able to pickup the work board and all fit under my drill press to keep the hole plumb. Rudder post will be a 1/4 brass rod with brass tube as a bushing. See photo, brass tube in hull. Next, I built a rudder substructure assembly which will be covered later with a wood or styrene full size rudder to fit the era. Took some very thin brass and formed it around the post, some brass plate and soldered as seen in photos. Brass heats up and solders well using my soldering station.

Moorcock by GeoffA Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 25 days ago
I bought the Moorcock from a fellow boater and decided to rebuild her as the Moorcock. The hull was stripped bare and the prop-shaft tube removed and completely remade with a new prop. The hull was then repainted and the life boat and davits added The superstructure was cleaned up and remade with a Robbe spring loaded grappling iron added to the rear deck.She is powered by a 24v scooted motor salvaged from a garbage bin and has 4 x 12v 7amh SLA's to provide power. She is a good strong vesel to sail and is often used as a recovery tug.

Holy SMOKE !! Video, Tin Can Madness by Joe727 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Doug, That's a very impressive list of ships! I was just thinking yesterday about how to build a smoker without a fan, your chimney effect caught my attention. My experimental builds so far push the smoke out quickly, I would prefer it puffing out. Deleting the fan and adding the proper length of stack could work, I will try. Your electronics are impressive, nice skills you have. I'm still working with vacuum tubes, valves. Regards, Joe

Smoke generator by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Have just made a prototype of a fan forced smoker which seems to be working well (despite breaking the heater coil by moving it while hot, - had it apart, broke wire, screw and washer repair, not quite as hot) I bought a couple of Heng Long smokers (for R/C tanks or cars) to play with, for $10 NZ each(or 5.3 Euros to you Northerners give or take a yen) from Bangood and just bought another from Ebay. There seem to be 2 different models, as one has a long coil with a lamp wick draped over it, which is sitting in the oil reservoir, the other has a small coil inside a piece of heat resistant woven tubing (as you might find insulating toaster/heater wiring etc) which acts as a wick and that also sits in cotton wool in the reservoir, (this seems to be the better of the two) Tip - don't fill the tank right up, only enough to soak the cotton, element should be just out of the oil. The wick loads the element. The better model seems to have a black top to the tank (also maybe either brown or black tank) and the other has a brown top and dirty brown tank. As with most of this stuff you won't know till you get it what it's going to be. What I did was remove the tank and cut off the pump tube just in front of the screw lugs (see black line in photo) then fitted the tank, and a 40x40x10 5v ESC fan (voltage controlled by a UBEC set to 5v on the jumpers) into a plastic electronics utility box from Jaycar (our local electronics and hobby store). I made up a double JST lead for the 2s 1800Mah Lipo and fired it up (using baby oil). It's pretty much silent and smokes well once it gets warmed up, ( starts smoking in about 5 seconds) You could control it (on/off volume) by either a remote on/off switch or perhaps a small cheap 10A brushed ESC. I would leave the fan running and control the element to avoid burning the element. The original pump tank inlet hole seems ok as is (approx 1.5mm) but you could enlarge it very slightly to get a better flow if you could find a better oil. At the electronics store they have proper smoke machine oil for $20 NZ per litre so I may have a look at that. The reason I went for the fan idea was that I found in std pump form, if I immersed a tube from the tank in water, it sucked water back into the tank. I was hoping it would pump smoke out of my HSL exhausts at water level alongside the cooling water but it would need a very light non return valve to do this. The fan seems to pump the smoke through 2mm ID silicone tube ok, so tubing of similar ID to the OD of the tank outlets should work well. These pumps in original form work pretty well for the price, and are cheap enough to keep a few for spare elements, the only thing is they are a bit noisy but in an 'engine sounding' way, (might add to the effect on a tug or work-boat though) What you have left after this mod is a very handy little geared motor with an eccentric output wheel which could be used for winches, radar and whirly bits of any description (see pic of motor leftover and original) To avoid burnout, these should be run on no more than a 2s (around 7.5v-(suggest 8v max with fan running) The other tank is going to work a lot better than this one but I'm not making a tug, just want a bit of exhaust smoke on start-up etc to go with the 2 sound units. Very cheap to make (around $25 NZ with pump, box, fan and UBEC all through Ebay, Aliexpress and Bangood (and local electronics store) If you wanted to run an ESC to control the smoke and you have no channels left to control it proportionally, you can always try using a second receiver bound to your TX, (if your TX will allow it,) power it and a brushed ESC (wired to the element) as normal and use the throttle channel to plug in your smoke control. This should work if you want more smoke as you accelerate or if you are using only 1 stick on a 2 stick TX you could use your 'elevator' stick pushed up (or a toggle switch if available) to start/stop the smoke (through the brushed ESC setup) . This setup weighs 100g (10g more than std) The quest for lots of smoke continues Will try to upload vid later and update progress.

Propshaft Lubrication by steve-d Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Been reading some old threads with plenty of reference to lubrication but only one mention of what to lubricate with (mix of engine oil and graphite powder). I have just fitted a replacement propshaft (M4) to my Huntsman 31 and fitted it with an oiler tube. So question is what to oil/grease it with? Steve

Plumbing the water-cooling for the ESC by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
The HobbyKing ESC I’m using has the facility for water cooling and as it will be in an enclosed location without any free ventilation it seems sensible to utilise this feature. To keep the water circuit as short as possible I will put the pickup just behind the propeller and the exhaust on the stern but as the boat has a bulkhead just in front of the stern skin I need to make an access hole through it to allow me to secure the nut on the stern skin. I made a hole through the bulkhead large enough to get a socket on the nut and reinforced the hole with a ply plate, similarly I reinforced the inside of the stern skin where the outlet passes through it. When I was happy that the arrangement worked and I could attach the hoses and securing clips easily I glued and pinned the stern skin to the hull. The water pickup is a standard one that is readily available but it’s supplied with overly large and ugly fixing nuts, the inside one is of no consequence but I thought that the outer one needed smartening up so I put it on a threaded rod and locked it in place with another nut and put that into the chuck of a drill and used a file to re-shape the nut to a pleasing taper….who needs a lathe......😜 I had to reduce the height of the inner keel former as the pickup tube is not long enough to get a good fixing with the internal nut, as the inner keel is balsa I fitted a ply reinforcing plate to spread the load. The last ‘photo shows the location of the ESC, main battery fuse and receiver. The hoses will be secured to the ESC with spring clips throughout. I found that the silicone tube I use tends to kink rather easily if the radius of a bend is too small and I found it necessary to form a tight spring coil around the piece that loops the water back through the ESC to prevent this happening.

Brushless motor(s) by canabus Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Charlie I have tested my 37" Perkasa with a brushless 3639-1100kv motor from Hobbyking, a 60A ESC, 3S 5800MAH Lipo battery and 37mm 3 blade CNC prop. It's dam fast !!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fddqnbnlrQ Canabus

Day Two Springer by Joe727 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Springer build log for website Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe Day 2 Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. If you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe

Rescue Vessel - Springer Tug by Joe727 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe

Being Sociable. by GaryLC Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Rick and good to hear from you, I also have a soft spot for Clyde Puffers a great little working boat, you have definitely chosen the most difficult boat to fit a stem plant into, as the boiler and chimney are right on the back end, with the prop shaft running underneath them. A 1930s Tug or Drifter would be less of a headache, and easier to remove the complete steam plant if necessary, let me know how you get on. Thanks for the info on Keith Appleton he has a lot of stuff on youtube. Regards.

Boat shaft connectors (which stuffs to use and which is good) by DodgyGeezer Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
I'm not sure what you mean by 'earthquakes' - do you mean there was lots of vibration? The prop-shaft and the motor shaft should be aligned as precisely as you can manage. Though a universal joint will accept some misalignment, you should aim to get things so precise that there is no need for a joint! That tube looks rather thin. I use tube which is 10-12mm in OD, with about 3-4 mm thick walls. You are correct that I 'make the shafts larger' by putting little knurled knobs made from aluminium bar on them. If you do not have a lathe, you can buy similar couplings like this: https://www.cornwallmodelboats.co.uk/acatalog/Robbe-Flexible...

Sanding done by steve-d Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
Most of the sanding is now done and the not so easy task of getting the propshaft and tube out (M3 so not really man enough). Bought loads of bits including the grab rails I've fitted. Bollards, cleats, capstan, anchor, chain, instruments,nav lights etc all boxed up ready to fit after paint. Also the crew has arrived from China. But, I have failed to find a VHF 'White Stick' style antenna anywhere....anyone seen one in any of the catalogues? Steve

BRAVE BORDERER - BRUSHLESS SUMMARY by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 4 months ago
The only thing you might have to watch out for is back feed from the pump out the aux tube (when moving) if you don't set up the y joints (must be y not T ) to create a venturi effect from the pump side. Doesn't matter standing still but at speed a T junction might reduce the flow as the flows will be fighting each other slightly. The beauty of the twin system is that if you are running a lot at high speed you could turn the pump off to save power. The best place to position water intakes is I have found is directly behind the prop (I usually just squash the brass tube slightly, fair it, cut it off at 45 deg and set it to just sit in the prop wash). At lower speeds especially, the prop will help to push water into the tubes rather than just relying on speed alone. Never had a problem with pickups interfering with rudder effectiveness as long as you fair the pickups nicely

Ashes the scratch built Motor Torpedo Boat by Sakibian Lieutenant   Posted: 4 months ago
I found this hull at thingiverse last year. I printed the hull from a local shop and rest was handmade. Firstly I bought a 2426 4200kv brushless 2-3s which was too powerful and too heavy for the boat size. The length is 38cm. And the 30Amp esc was also too big for it's size. After that I tried small 180 brushed motor with 20A brushed esc w/brake. It was perfect (still it's heavy😂). The bridge and deck is made by 1.75mm pvc,torpedos are made of wooden pencil. Small battery space takes a 2s 500mah lipo. 30mm 3blade propeller. YouTube video link is here: https://youtu.be/KZdmZ8_Z0IE