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>> Home > Tags > prop tube

prop tube
brass tube
brass prop
prop
prop shaft
propeller
propshaft
propshaft alignment
propshop
racing prop
prop tube
Being Sociable. by GaryLCoupland Petty Officer   Posted: 11 days ago
Hi Rick and good to hear from you, I also have a soft spot for Clyde Puffers a great little working boat, you have definitely chosen the most difficult boat to fit a stem plant into, as the boiler and chimney are right on the back end, with the prop shaft running underneath them. A 1930s Tug or Drifter would be less of a headache, and easier to remove the complete steam plant if necessary, let me know how you get on. Thanks for the info on Keith Appleton he has a lot of stuff on youtube. Regards.

Boat shaft connectors (which stuffs to use and which is good) by DodgyGeezer Lieutenant   Posted: 17 days ago
I'm not sure what you mean by 'earthquakes' - do you mean there was lots of vibration? The prop-shaft and the motor shaft should be aligned as precisely as you can manage. Though a universal joint will accept some misalignment, you should aim to get things so precise that there is no need for a joint! That tube looks rather thin. I use tube which is 10-12mm in OD, with about 3-4 mm thick walls. You are correct that I 'make the shafts larger' by putting little knurled knobs made from aluminium bar on them. If you do not have a lathe, you can buy similar couplings like this: https://www.cornwallmodelboats.co.uk/acatalog/Robbe-Flexible...

Sanding done by steve-d Lieutenant   Posted: 20 days ago
Most of the sanding is now done and the not so easy task of getting the propshaft and tube out (M3 so not really man enough). Bought loads of bits including the grab rails I've fitted. Bollards, cleats, capstan, anchor, chain, instruments,nav lights etc all boxed up ready to fit after paint. Also the crew has arrived from China. But, I have failed to find a VHF 'White Stick' style antenna anywhere....anyone seen one in any of the catalogues? Steve

BRAVE BORDERER - BRUSHLESS SUMMARY by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
The only thing you might have to watch out for is back feed from the pump out the aux tube (when moving) if you don't set up the y joints (must be y not T ) to create a venturi effect from the pump side. Doesn't matter standing still but at speed a T junction might reduce the flow as the flows will be fighting each other slightly. The beauty of the twin system is that if you are running a lot at high speed you could turn the pump off to save power. The best place to position water intakes is I have found is directly behind the prop (I usually just squash the brass tube slightly, fair it, cut it off at 45 deg and set it to just sit in the prop wash). At lower speeds especially, the prop will help to push water into the tubes rather than just relying on speed alone. Never had a problem with pickups interfering with rudder effectiveness as long as you fair the pickups nicely

Ashes the scratch built Motor Torpedo Boat by Sakibian Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
I found this hull at thingiverse last year. I printed the hull from a local shop and rest was handmade. Firstly I bought a 2426 4200kv brushless 2-3s which was too powerful and too heavy for the boat size. The length is 38cm. And the 30Amp esc was also too big for it's size. After that I tried small 180 brushed motor with 20A brushed esc w/brake. It was perfect (still it's heavy😂). The bridge and deck is made by 1.75mm pvc,torpedos are made of wooden pencil. Small battery space takes a 2s 500mah lipo. 30mm 3blade propeller. YouTube video link is here: https://youtu.be/KZdmZ8_Z0IE

kipper by keithtindley Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
aero-naut mowe 2 kit. my first rc model boat with a few extras.The kit was ok to build but the prop coupling was a length of silcone tube ? it spun off at the first test run.This was the start of me fitting universal couplings to my boats.The company were being mean using a cheap piece of tube.It runs very quiet and smooth but needed a lot of front end ballast .i made this to try and drag my grandson away from his ipad,phone and the game of fortnite .I tried to get him to help build and run it but to no avail.I now am enjoying a second childhood building boat kits !

Carry case. by DodgyGeezer Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
"It's not very heavy and it won't get wet!" Unless you never put it down on wet grass, and drain and then towel your boats after use before putting them back, it will. Be sure to get all the water out of the prop-tube.... " I can't be arsed with fancy carpentry. " No carpentry involved. The material is like cardboard, and you just cut it out with a Stanley knife and fold it. Takes between 10 and 30 mins to make a box from scratch... " And what IS Correx? " Sometimes known as 'twin-flute', it's the stuff estates agent's boards are made of, amongst a myriad of other uses. A twin-walled polypropylene rather like a kind of cardboard made of plastic. Very tough, feather-light and impact-resistant. Self-coloured (many colours available) and completely waterproof. Needs no framing - the sides are strong enough on their own... See the link for full description, place to get it and plans...

Rudders and Propellers by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
BTW; I copied your above massive text block into a document file and split it up into paragraphs so I could see where you're at! My conclusion: so far so good BUT! You made the one classic mistake of many model boat / ship builders 🤔 You continued the prop shaft tube right back to the propeller and hence you had to make oversize struts to support them. This is fundamental wrong and creates unnecessary work.😉 On real ships, including the Schnellboote, the so called 'stuffing tube' is JUST THAT, it 'stuffs' the shaft through the hull and includes stuffing glands to prevent the ingress of sea water. Outside the hull ONLY the rotating shaft itself continues on through the bearing in the support strut and to the prop. See attached pics of my HMS Belfast as an example. There was actually no reason for you to make oversize strut bearings, simply bushes to match your prop SHAFT not the tube would have been correct. Inside the real ship there is also NO TUBE, only bearings at suitable intervals. They look like gigantic versions of the big ends in your car. Imagine on really big ships, carriers, container ships, bulk tankers etc, with shaft diameters of 1metre or so how big the 'tube' would be, how much weight that would add and how difficult it would be to service and maintain! I've often noticed in posts here that folk confuse shaft and tube, often referring to the whole assembly as 'the shaft'. For convenience we modellers use prop tubes, who wants to fiddle about making a row of internal shaft bearings no one will ever see and will most likely never be really concentric? The downside is that continuing this 'convenience' outside the hull is wrong, adds weight and detracts from the scale appearance of the model. 😭 OK, it's 3am here now so - orf me 'obby 'orse and up (in my case down!) the wooden stairs to Bedfordshire, G'night all, cheers, Doug😎 Re shaft length: What fits fits, what don't don't! Such a question is like asking 'How long is a piece of string?'! If all three motors abreast won't fit you have to decide if the central motor should / will fit fore or aft of the outer motors. Then measure / adjust the shaft length accordingly. Before you start fitting the centre motor check what length shafts are commercially available and adjust your motor fit to suit. Otherwise make your own shafts and tubes to fit as required, as I've started doing cos I got fed up with 'standard sizes' wot don' wanna fit my ship. 🤔 G'night All, cheers, Doug 😎

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
The weather has quickly turned colder, giving an excuse to get back to this model. Stripped out much of the interior and the prop. shafts to replace the nylon propellers with brass. These items all needed removing for painting, so decided to paint the hull before reassembly and then moving onto the superstructure. Fortunately, examining similar naval vessels and several U Tube videos, confirmed the hull as light grey, the deck a darker one of the 50 shades of grey and the lower hull below the waterline black. Used thin Tamiya masking tape to define clean colour separations, followed by regular tape, masked the hull into colour sections and sprayed using “rattle” cans. After the colours applied a light overall Matt coat to subdue any shine. The results are satisfactory. Will now reassemble and move onto building the superstructure and the other fittings. Prior to the season closing decided to experiment with my new Flysky Tx/Rx package, shortly to be fitted to this model. This Tx has a servo limiting function, which was hoping could also be used to restrict ESC output. Would like to make the full speed motor response correspond to full Tx control position. Currently can over power the model; which lifts the stern, causing it to come off the plane and then dig the bow in. Was thinking that if full throttle could be set at around 90% forward control movement and 40% sternwards the model would retain adequate performance, but without being overpowered or very sensitive to control lever movement. As the Brave was not available, tried the idea on my Daman Stan 4207 model. This is brushed motor powered and a good performer. Obviously the settings for the Brave will be different, but at least could try to see if the idea would work – it did! This Tx function is easy to use and adjustments can be made whilst the model is on the water. Once the ideal settings are achieved they can be programmed and then retained in the Tx. Will try this on the Brave when back on the water next Spring.

Boat hull by 2435mick Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
I have for sale this group hull for a coastguard type boat, I bought it with the intention of restoring it etc but it will never happen, it's just the hull with prop tubes, no superstructure, £20 collection from Nelson Lancashire or could possibly post at cost

Rudders and Propellers by teejay Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi all for the second blog report on the schnellboot I am going to go over the rudder a propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat, these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts. which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel) and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum powder mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The fourth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I must ask for some help could anyone advise me on the length of propeller shafts, I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft, but port and starboard will have to be longer. and I also need advice on selecting the motors, I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.

20th Scale ELCO 80ft PT boat part 9 by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
I would check out the water cooled back plates for the out- runners as they will possibly run real hot if at all loaded up without cooling, unless you have fans like aircraft propellers (even then and in open air they still get hot!) I would look at this seriously to avoid cooking your motors. Hobby King usually has various cooling parts, or EBay, Aliexpress, Banggood etc. Bit late now I suppose, but water cooled in-runners (around 2000kv 28mm diam) are a better idea for boats. You can buy in-runners and water jackets to fit them as I did but they need flushing after use with CRC or similar to avoid rust, (I'll be copper tube wrapping the next lot, then there are no worries)

S.H.G Black tornado by thatsinkinfeelin18 Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
hi got this off internet not eBay!!!! going to over the winter add meteor 40 engine propshaft n' tube were already fitted as was water scoop n' outlet ,rudder , trim tabs,a 2channel Acoms r/c receiver and and 2 servos no trans. but it did all work ( all in a gooy margerine tub possibly the best part of 40 yrs worth of GOO!!!! Hull /deck look to be in good condition! will keep u informed on "resto" over the winter months regards

Darby One Design hydro... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi all, here's progress on the Darby One Design. Got these pics just before it started peeing down, so no Chris-Craft pics. Fitted a brushless outrunner I found in a box. Might work, might not... Home made prop shaft/tube, home made off-set rudder. Planked balsa top cover to keep weight down. 1/6th scale 26"long, 10" beam. Thick grey cellulose primer to act as a light filler for scratches, etc. Martin

propshafts lubrications by Maurice Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Guys, I just would like to enquire what s the easiest way to lubricate (fill) propshafts for a tug scale 1:40 ,meaning 10mm tube and 4mm rod. thanks for your help 😊 Maurice