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>> Home > Tags > prop

prop
prop
A return to the hobby! by Colin H. Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 45 minutes ago
I also tend to use Sla batteries a model this size should easily be able to take a 12v 7ah battery, some of my models I have to use 2 batteries, 1for ballast or in parallel to give longer running time. The 660 motor should be fine, what size prop are you going to use. Cheers Colin.

The wheelhouse navigation light. by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 hours ago
This is a small item but very visible on the wheelhouse and since the standard for this item has been set I have to follow suit. So first of all get some 3mm blue LEDs ordered and then it’s on with preparing the white metal body. I used by hand as suggested a series of drills increasing in diameter until 3.1 dia was reached but only 2/3 down the length from the front the smaller hole (1.5mm) was bored right through for the wires to exit. Arrival of the LEDs, first check the LED using my power supply, just over 3 volts seems to illuminate to the correct level. Next was to remove the shoulder on its plastic casing so the whole body does not exceed 3mm over its length and lightly abrade the outside to give a diffused light. Next cut the LED legs to 2mm from the plastic casing noting which is positive, next prepare the wires. I used Futaba servo wire cable 22awg which is very flexible and with the white signal wire stripped off leaving a red and black wire. These were tinned and cropped to 2mm and then quickly soldered to the appropriate terminal. Next check the LED still works! first hurdle over, I now needed to check the that when the LED goes into the body it doesn’t short out so checking the diameter over the widest part which is over the soldered terminals this was 0.1 below 3mm. I decided that shrink sleeve was too thick so I mixed some epoxy resin and coated all around the terminals, this proved to be satisfactory in both non-conductivity and dimensionally. Now the final test, using some aliphatic wood glue I slid the LED into the body whilst it was illuminated as it was a tight push fit, bingo it’s still lit – leave to set. I used aliphatic glue, as it would be easier to remove should I ever have to change the LED. The body still needs painting white but this will be done with all the other fittings at a later stage.

Brixham trawler IBEX by samnewbie Seaman   Posted: 12 hours ago
Edward, Yes - thinking out problems is half the fun😊 My first build was a Vic Smeed Starlet - just completed. Pretty straight forward but I over engineered it to try out some ideas - thinking the ideas through was great fun. So although I will not start the Cariad until January I'm trying to explore problems now. The angle of the rudder shaft is one that I think I have a solution to. Take it right through the deck then put a handle onto it, hinged at the shaft so that it does not rise and fall as it is turned. Then a Bowden cable from each side of the cockpit to power the steering. I will enjoy building a mock up and trying it out! As to the rudder, I am thinking of a detachable extension - downwards. I'm also thinking about placing the prop to one side - perhaps more authentic but also well clear of the rudder. One thing that I'm still thinking through is the access hatch. I see some builders move the dingy to the centre and create a hatch here but I like the clean decking on the original, with the dingy to the side. A hatch to the side would work for everything but the top screw for the detachable keel. Some more time dreaming up a solution. Thanks Sam

HMVS CERBERUS by Colin H. Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
Nice model, lovely detail. Where did you get the prop, keep up the good work. Cheers Colin.

PS Waverley by petercbrown Lieutenant   Posted: 3 days ago
I hope you get properly compensated. What a nightmare😱!!

36" Thames River Police Launch by Robbob by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
After the successful build of the ‘Vintage Model Works’ RAF Crash Rescue Tender I was asked by Mike Cummings of VMW if I would undertake to build a prototype of their new model with the aim of checking the construction method and the assembly instructions for accuracy before the kit is put into production. The model is a ‘Thames River Police Launch’ and is based on the original design by Phil Smith for the Veron company, this was a very popular model kit in the late 50’s and 60’s and sold for the princely sum of 43 shillings and tuppence, approximately £2.15 in today’s money but an equivalent cost of £48.50 in 1960. This design has been updated to accommodate electric propulsion and radio control by Colin Smith, the son of the original designer and it has been re-scaled to be 36” in length where the original was 24” which gives much more scope for detailing and provides more ‘hiding room’ for the drive, control systems and all the associated wiring. The kit produced by VMW uses the same construction techniques as the original and the materials are a combination of balsa and plywood both of which a laser and CNC cut for precision. The ply and balsa materials supplied are of very high quality as one would expect from VMW and all the stripwood for the chines, rubbing strakes and deck detailing is included, even the dowel required for the mast is in the box, very comprehensive! The kit also includes white metal fittings such as the fairleads and stanchions, and the searchlight and horns. The glazing for the windows comes in the kit too. The instruction sheet supplied is in need of revision as it is largely taken directly from the original as written by Phil Smith and some of the terminology needs updating, for instance the ply bottom and side skins are referred to as ‘strakes’ but I understand that a re-write of the instructions is in hand along with an updated plan showing the best positioning for the motor, prop-shaft, battery, ESC, receiver, rudder and servo. During construction I have added a few additional pieces of ply or balsa as reinforcement or supports and substituted some balsa parts for ply where I thought a stronger material would be better. I also added some hatches to give access to the wiring at the bow and the rudder & servo at the stern but largely I have not gone ‘off plan’ to any extent. The pictures show the model in it’s present state (Nov 2018) and is ready for painting and finishing.

HMS M.33 by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
Apropos Info Steve, I guess you can pop along to the Portsmouth Historic Dockyard for a gander and measure up on the original! 😊 Happy crawling about 😁 Cheers, Doug https://www.wikiwand.com/en/HMS_M33 https://www.wikiwand.com/en/M29-class_monitor

BRAVE BORDERER - BRUSHLESS SUMMARY by jbkiwi Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 6 days ago
The only thing you might have to watch out for is back feed from the pump out the aux tube (when moving) if you don't set up the y joints (must be y not T ) to create a venturi effect from the pump side. Doesn't matter standing still but at speed a T junction might reduce the flow as the flows will be fighting each other slightly. The beauty of the twin system is that if you are running a lot at high speed you could turn the pump off to save power. The best place to position water intakes is I have found is directly behind the prop (I usually just squash the brass tube slightly, fair it, cut it off at 45 deg and set it to just sit in the prop wash). At lower speeds especially, the prop will help to push water into the tubes rather than just relying on speed alone. Never had a problem with pickups interfering with rudder effectiveness as long as you fair the pickups nicely

BRAVE BORDERER - BRUSHLESS SUMMARY by jbkiwi Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 6 days ago
I used this pump from E Bay which pumps well, and with the rubber mounts is quiet. 6-12v (I use a 2 cell LiPo which seems perfect) and am cooling 2 2000kv 28mm in-runners. Have tried a few different pumps and these have been the best so far. You have to be careful that you don't over pressurize your plumbing system, as if the hoses come off while running you can fill your boat up in no time. It's safest to adjust your pump voltage or piping to a 'neutral' pressure rather than risk hosing down your electrics. I used twin pick-ups behind the props and separate feeds, one for the pump and one direct in case the pump stopped or blocked.

Ashes the scratch built Motor Torpedo Boat by Sakibian Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 7 days ago
I found this hull at thingiverse last year. I printed the hull from a local shop and rest was handmade. Firstly I bought a 2426 4200kv brushless 2-3s which was too powerful and too heavy for the boat size. The length is 38cm. And the 30Amp esc was also too big for it's size. After that I tried small 180 brushed motor with 20A brushed esc w/brake. It was perfect (still it's heavy😂). The bridge and deck is made by 1.75mm pvc,torpedos are made of wooden pencil. Small battery space takes a 2s 500mah lipo. 30mm 3blade propeller. YouTube video link is here: https://youtu.be/KZdmZ8_Z0IE

Aldi excellent service by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
I fixed the broken one easily. A wire broke where it entered the little pcb.Lifted the board to unsolder the stub of wire left in place and poked it out with a cocktail stick. The wire still had enough exposed wire to pop through the hole and a quick dab with the soldering iron and it wa fixed. Getting the case closed properly was a pig but fixed now. Replacement arrived today too. Woo Hoo.👍🤓 P.S. what does this represent😤?

Search light by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
A small tip and word to the wise Michael, When I take shots for posting I first load 'em to the PC and view in full size before going any further. If there's anything wrong I can reshoot before carrying on, either with the assembly or the post. Doesn't always work out that way, depends on how carried away I am with the job in hand 😁 'The word' 😉If you can try to get the photos in proper relation to the horizontal and vertical. You're making some of us seasick! 🤐😱😲 Nevertheless, very nice work, Hat Off Sir 👍 The comment from Robbob (King of the Crash Tenders) is praise indeed. I once spent an entire afternoon reading his astounding build blog and picking up tips. I just got 'hooked' 😊 Cheers, Doug 😎

BRAVE BORDERER - BRUSHLESS SUMMARY by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
The pump was installed to give positive water flow even when stationary. Felt this would ensure cooling under most conditions. The plumbing is quite torturous and suspected there might be a significant head drop in the circuit. With the wisdom of hindsight, probably overkill; the water scoop between propellers may prove adequate.

Must get the skins on before I pull all of my hair out!! by MouldBuilder Captain   Posted: 10 days ago
The rudder tubes are set in place as are the prop shafts.😱 I have had a quick look and it appears that the shafts are very slightly closer to the keel than the rudders.🤓

Must get the skins on before I pull all of my hair out!! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
OK, props outward turning. I assume you've already fitted the rudders, correct me if I'm wrong. Cos if not you have some wiggle room how you fit the rudders (in or outboard of the shafts) which affects the rudder efficiency and can reduce the braking / dig-in effect a little. Let me know and I'll check my notes which way the offset should be. Can't hold everything in me bonce! As Einstein said- "The brain is for thinking, not for storing facts, but to know where to find the facts"! All the best, Doug 😎