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>> Home > Tags > propshaft

propshaft
prop shaft
propshaft alignment
shaft diameter
propshop
propshaft
Elizabeth by muddy Admiral   Posted: 5 days ago
Started on the bottom skins, these were removed and obechie planked instead. Checking the furniture, motors propshafts and props.

David Metcalfs Waveney - "The Scout" by Flack Admiral   Posted: 9 days ago
For sale is my 1/12th scale model of the Waveney Lifeboat - "The Scout" Kit produced by David Metcalf. Built to a good standard with an array of working features: Working radar controlled through a voltage reducer Navigation lights, mast lights, front and rear searchlights, flashing blue light and well lights all controlled by an Action Electronics P62 quad switcher. The flashing effect of the blue light is controlled by an Action ElectronicsP73 multi flasher. Powered by two Turnigy 3542/5 1250kv brushless outrunners controlled by two Fusion Hawk 60amp electronic speeed controllers. Fitted with Raboesch propshafts and 3 bladed brass left and right handed propellors. Batteries and radios are not included in the sale. The model is available for pick up only with cash on collection from Stafford ST16 which is approximately 1/2 mile from Junction 14 of the M6 motorway. Price £700 ovno

S 100 Schnellboot RC build by kmbcsecretary Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Coming along nicely , I have done the conversation of this kit myself some years ago when it first came out . I had to make the propshafts myself as the conversion kit wasn't available then but I found that it handled better using only one prop rather than the intended 3 props plus the lack of space inside the hull for the rest of the electrics. Ron

47" Fireboat power question by ronrees Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Shaun, This design of hull forces the craft higher and higher the faster it goes. When it is high on the plane and almost hanging on the last few inches of propshaft it can fall off the plane either way, usually to the right (Starboard) side because of engine torque. The full size boats were fitted with 2 or 3 engines to help counteract this. The British Powerboat Company, who originally designed the hull that Vospers copied back in the 1930s/40s also noticed this which led to double skinning the hull with 1 inch thick mahogany for extra strength against pounding and falling on the waves. Lowering the drive angle of the propellor shafts and adding more weight from the C of G back to near the stern. We build this 3 screwed designed hull with one mainshaft usually so do not have the benefit of shaft rotation to stabilise the boat at speed. It was in the 1960's that Fairey engineers had the same problems (Swordsman,Huntsman etc) They came up with large transom mounted powered Trim Tabs. Their boats had similar problems and only one shaft in the main. I suggest you try fitting 2 x 2 inch wide by 1 inch deep trim tabs at the very bottom of your transom midway between the keel and the chine as well as move your battery packs forward a bit initially. Try some fast tests with this, you only need 2 to 4 degrees of down on the tabs initially. Add removeable weights near the CG as needed, a bit at a time but don't stop the bow lifting up onto the plane. Have fun, best of luck. Ron Rees

I want my workshop back! by aanside Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
I already mentioned in another thread ("Any Clues") that three boats have been dumped in my workshop to see if I can find a buyer for any of them. 1) Caldercraft "Joffre" Tug, already built but in grave need of TLC with the propshaft tight and the rudder shaft too tight to move. The vessel is filthy dirty. 2) Billings "Le Pourquoi-pas", hull assembled with decks, remainder of kit & fittings look to be complete 3) Billings "Smit Nederland" Nr 528 - unstarted kit but does not have detail fittings I can post any of these boats and would appreciate a sensible offer for any of them - I do need the space to get on with my own work. Please PM me for any further information Regards Barry

Help Needed new Builder Billings St Canute by Richard7 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
Hello, thank you for your reply, l will endeavour to post a couple of pictures. There is no diagram in the instructions regarding positioning the motor which is typical of Billing Boats, all it does show is a picture of the propshaft. I will scan that picture tomorrow and attach the PDF. I took the advise on the Billing Boats UK regarding the motor size M500 (Mtroniks). Cheers Richard

1960S Taycol electric motor by CB90 Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
Could try general suppression capacitors arrangement, I have also seen the can or frame of a motor connected to earth via a wire soldered to the brass propshaft. You could shield the motor by enclosing it in a metal box, be careful not to short circuit anything, similar to Faraday cage .

Command Boat 90 by CB90 Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
Scratch built at 12th scale from pictures and profiles of the internet. The boat was originally built in Sweden a class of fast military assault craft originally developed for the Swedish Navy by Dockstavarvet Speed: 40 knots (74 km/h) Draught: 0.8 m (2 ft 7 in) Length: 15.9 m (52 ft) Overall; 14.9 (48') Complement: 3 (two officers and one engineer); Up to 21 amphibious troops with full equipment Armament: 3 × Browning M2HB machine guns; 1 × Mk 19 grenade launcher; 4 naval mines or 6 depth charges . The Model I was attracted to this boat due to its great performance and maneuverability, this was mainly due to the use of twin water jets as the main propulsion, this is a trade off with efficiency. So my start point was to collect as much information as possible about the boat this involved collecting pictures and profiles of the craft from various sources. http://www.dockstavarvet.se/products/combat-and-patrol-boats... Eventually I found some plans of sort :- http://laurell.today/boats/combat/plans.html My Dad was a boat builder in the days of wooden yachts, and had showed me how to make plans and frames from a line drawing. I went about this first by creating a prototype about 24 in long out of light ply. I then created full size plans of the model to be made. Pictures of small prototype finally painted plain green. The Main model Used my computer to print out the frames onto paper, cut them out and used them as templates for the ply ribs. The construction was simple chine style, with 1.5 mm ply. I tried to build jet drives but failed to produce a effective unit. So reverted to propshafts which worked out well with better control and the boat can spin on it own axis by putting one engine in reverse the other in forward and adjusting the twin rudders. That it for now, hope it was of some interest

Devil in the detail! by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Doug, Looking at my rudders comparing them to some pics I’ve found online, my rudders are too big and therefore I will reduce them in size, no biggie, 10 minutes work should see that done. Back to the struts. I would have made them from brass, however as my propshafts are in brass tubes for the whole length, I feel that the plastic versions I’ve made should be ok for aesthetics as the brass tubes seem rigid enough, hopefully no chance of any whip? I’m planning on running this on 2S lipo to give a scale speed, all depends what the watt meters says when I test the motors with props in water. Having the option to go to 3S if needed. I don’t plan on having a great deal of rudder throw and will programme in some expo to soften the rudders throw. Of course, if needed, I am more than happy to make adjustments and incorporate recommendations as given by the lovely people on this forum. It’s still a learning curve for me as I bring 45 years of aircraft experience over to the boat world! If anyone requires any aircraft advice, I’m your man!

Devil in the detail! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
I'm with you there Skydive 👍What Boatshed means is the part of the rudder in front of the stock. Thinks: are you building an Offshore Power Boat or a scale Lifeboat? If the former then follow Boatshed's recommendation. If the latter and the rudder is 'scale' then leave it alone. Any braking effect, which usually is only significant in a fast racing boat model or other fast planing types, can be diminished by reducing the rudder servo throw at the TX. One should also consider how the original behaved, maybe they did 'dig in' maybe not. There has to be a reason why such rudders were developed, and surely not just to annoy modellers 😁 One more minor point that struck me - Ouch 😭 Your prop struts! "not that it provides a huge amount of support but adds to the scale appearance." Even in a model they can be important. To help reduce potential whipping of the propshaft, especially if the model is overpowered. Actually in the originals they were vital, especially in larger vessels. The purpose of these struts, in larger vessels 'A' frames, is to provide support to the end of the shaft which carries the prop weighing several tons and, more important, to carry the bearing for the outer end of the shaft! Actually in the originals the shaft tube, or 'Stuffing Box' would not extend significantly beyond the hull. Thus the strut or A frame was vital for the shaft end bearing, fitted immediately in front of the prop for maximum stability. Attached pics of my HMS Belfast (sorry don't 'ave nutt'n smaller with this feature🤔) show the arrangement. Have witnessed such construction in various shipyards around the world. Last one in UK was the first T45, quite an experience! 😲 In the end she's your boat, if it feels good do it! 😉 I would leave the rudder alone if it is 'as fitted'. 👍 I make my struts and A frames from brass sheet and tube. Cheers Doug 😎 PS Stick with the brass Donnie! 👍

Vintage Aerokit Crash Tender by CB90 Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
Brought this vintage Aero Kits RAF Crash Tender for £50 from Newcastle area, it is the 34in version. To my surprise at home I found that it had a Bullet 30 motor installed these motors were the top drawer motor of early fast electrics in the early 1980's and its the only one I've ever seen, it can run on 24v and pull around 15A giving 300w not bad for a brushed motor. due to the power of this motor I have modified the hull under the water line with turn fins and trim tabs to reduce torque roll and improve turning stability, the underside is incorrect already as it only has one propshaft, where the original had two and I believe that both props turned in the same direction. The Pictures here show some of the work in progress I have remounted the motor and added a speed controller rated at 24v I have remade the stern compartment and rudder gear under it. I have blocked windows and foamed the front half of the boat. made missing parts and repaired delaminating ply. Note old ply is not as good as modern, the glue is not as water resistant. Have painted the hull and have just ordered the decals from Cornwall model Boats :-https://www.cornwallmodelboats.co.uk/cgi-bin/sh000001.pl?WD=... The 34in is 1/16 scale Fitting can be brought but many are cast white metal and can add weight to the boat, I have made two water cannons and plan to buy plastic fittings from this site. This has turned out to be a task that is difficult to assess how much effort and money to spend on a hull that has been built by someone else (say no more). Have just finished the steps for the stern compartment. Painted and now for the test run. the Bullet 30 motor ran well between 14 and 18v,

PT 109 by CB90 Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 7/10] 40"/3000g PT 109 Capable of 9mph and a runtime of 30mins Twin Propellors (3 Blade 35mm) Direct Drive to a Graupner 600s (3 Blade) Powered by NiCad (7.2v) 4Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through 2x Aquapower (30Amps) ESC - Comments: PT 109 The famous ww2 PT boat skippered by JF Kennedy (later to be President of the USA) This has be one of my have to have model boats and it was by luck that I found one for sale on a model boat club's web site in 2013, £100.00 later and a journey from Cumbria to Yorkshire and back, I had myself a ProBoat PT 109 This was a ready made RTR model when new and is 40in (1m) long, the boat needed some small repairs but after a test run I found that the running gear was noisy and on investigation discovered that both propshaft were bent and had no bearings from new, the couplings were just direct connections. So with great care I replaced both prop-shafts, propellers, coupling for two double Huco's (universal) and the single ESC by two new Aqua speed controllers and both motors with Graupner speed 600's Note I also foamed the front compartments to make it unsinkable in theroy.

PT 109 by CB90 Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
PT 109 was one of the hundreds of motor torpedo boats (PT) of the PT 103 class completed between 1942 and 1945 by Elco Naval Division of Electric Boat Company at Bayonne, New Jersey. The Elco boats were the largest in size of the three types of PT boats built for U.S. use during World War II. Wooden-hulled, 80 feet long with a 20-foot, 8-inch beam, the Elco PT boats had three 12-cylinder Packard gasoline engines generating a total of 4,500 horsepower for a designed speed of 41 knots. With accommodations for 3 officers and 14 men, the crew varied from 12 to 14. Its full-load displacement was 56 tons. Early Elco boats had two 20mm guns, four .50-caliber machine guns, and two or four 21-inch torpedo tubes. Some of them carried depth charges or mine racks. Later boats mounted one 40mm gun and four torpedo launching racks. Many boats received ad-hoc refits at advanced bases, mounting such light guns as Army Air Forces 37mm aircraft guns and even Japanese 23mm guns. Some PTs later received rocket launchers. This Proboat PT 109 model was brought in 2013 for £100 these boats are rare now, This one had a few faults with the propshafts they were bent and noisy both were replaced, with quality 4mm shafts, motors twin 600s were also replaced by Graupner versions along with mounts and couplings, basically all the running gear, also two ESCs by Aquapower were added and a 2.4G RC system.

WWII Italian MAS 562 by CB90 Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
MAS 562 (Motoscafo Armato Silurante: Torpedo Armed Motorboat) While Browsing the internet I came across a free plan dated 1969 if a Italian Motor torpedo boat I found the craft interesting as it had a stepped hull, and this looked like a challenge, so more research and historical digging. Built in 1941 by Baglietto, Varazze: built of wood (mahogany). Baglietto, Varazze: built MAS 561 through to MAS 570 MAS Baglietto class 500, 4th series" Displacement 27.8 tons Displacement max 28 tons Length 18.7m Width 4.7m Draught 1.5m Propeller shafts 2 Machinery Isotta Fraschini petrol engines and Alfa Romeo or Cararo cruising petrol engines Power, h.p. 2000 or 2300 / 140 or 100 Max speed 43 to 46 knots Fuel tank 1.5 tons Endurance 350 nautical miles at 42 knots Armament 1 x - 13.2/76 or 1 x - 20/65 Breda 1940, 2 x 450mm Torpedoes , 6 - 10 x Depth charges Crew complement 13 persons MAS 562, was captured by Germans 9/9/1943, transferred to RSI, was painted in disorientation camouflage, was captured by American PT' boats on June 30, 1944 and PT 306 towed the prize into Bastia. It was painted in disorientation camoflarge It is one of the few to have survived the war and passed to the Italian Guardia di Finanza in the 1950's. In 1940 there were 48 MAS 500-class units. The plan shows the gun on a box platform not the case on the real boat. Making this boat so small has been a bit of a challenge. Running gear 2x Graupner 600 8.4v about 70watts each at rated voltage. 2x shafts 2x opposite turning propellers (2 or 3 bladed) 3 blades on real boat. 35-40 mm 2x ESC 1 or 2 Batteries The Model after studying plans and photographs I could see a few things that I could add to the plans. A cambered deck A revised transom shape (not square) Two propshaft and two electric motors with air cooling. A reduction in the number of frames /ribs as the boat I was going to make was only 29in (83cm) long. the three main problems with the hull where :- the new frame positions and the thickness of the stringers the wood I used was too thick 12mm x 6mm for a small boat Correct gun and position. The Hull is now skinned I will upload some photos soon.

Propshaft and oiler fitting by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Hi Colin. The propshaft, oiler and support are available from this UK supplier. hxttp://www.modelboatbits.com/MAXIDRIVE-P-FRAME-4MM-1 Good luck with the build. Robbob.